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Goodbye Television Centre

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 112
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Friday, 22nd March 2013

    Is no-one watching this? Yes it’s group of celebrities commenting on various types of output from TVC over the years illustrated by clips, but it’s rather less ‘showbizzy’ than I expected and rather more cutting. Robustly chaired by Michael Grade, the speakers – Danny Baker, David Attenborough, etc – have been surprisingly candid about the wrongness of the decision to close. “This is where television is made”; “Where is the home for what used to be made here now?”

    A sad day.

    Good night, W12 8QT.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Sam (U15466226) on Friday, 22nd March 2013

    I watched it Chris. Very interesting and thought-provoking.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Watched and enjoyed the 8 comedians talking, but lost interest after that when the 'presenters' came on.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Sue_Aitch (U3336990) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    The postcode for TVC is W12 7RJ and has been for ages.

    There are lots of BBC PO Boxes at the Shepherds Bush Delivery Office that need cancelling an 'all.

    I do not believe the decsion to sell TVC was wrong, particularly when it was admitted no Drama output had been made from any of the Studios after 1994.

    if Penelope Keith, who observied the areas that had moved to Salford, and Brian Blessed would care to pop over to BBC Roath Lock's state of the art Drama facilities, they might not be so mournful of all that has passed.

    It's not even as though TVC is being scheduled for demolition. Studios 1-3 will be back and people will be able to visit those Wood Lane premises again after the refurb,

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by U15636942 (U15636942) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Watched and enjoyed the 8 comedians talking, but lost interest after that when the 'presenters' came on.

     

    I was the other way round: the presenters were of more interest to me.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Reservoir Hamster (U14288323) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    The exchange between David Attenborough and Bob Harris was a golden moment in itself.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by pyanaman (U2905997) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Watched and enjoyed the 8 comedians talking, but lost interest after that when the 'presenters' came on.

     

    I was the other way round: the presenters were of more interest to me. 
    It is my imagination or was Bruce trying to out talk all the others making it just about HIM?

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    What an absolutely abysmal television programme this actually turned out to be, with the exception of the video footage of Victoria Coren delving into Television Centre's past history.

    It was nothing more than a really dull and incredibly poor television celebfest with the likes of geriatric comedic guests, Ronnie Corbet, Terry Wogan, Bruce Forsyth and Noel Edmunds all reminiscing with host presenter, Michael Grade, about the past.

    After enduring a maximum of twenty minutes I simply couldn't bear no more and consequently switched channels. In by doing so I regrettably missed David Attenborough's input, and contribution, which might have been actually worth watching, especially if he was critical about the decision close down Television Centre and move most of the recording studios to Broadcasting House.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by average40 (U14458923) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    I'd like to have seen this. Not on i-player and no plans to be shown again. Every other programme on BBC4 is shown about 23 times but not this. smiley - steam

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Sue_Aitch (U3336990) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It wasn't live, so edited. What you saw may have only part of what was recorded on the night.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    @sardonic (living up to his/her name) – surprisingly, given your handle, you seem to have missed the acidic comments from many of the guests bemoaning the closure, even – in the case of Danny Baker – railing against it and criticising the prevailing orthodoxy that 'regional’ = good. Or indeed Grade rather amusingly living up to his own reputation as tough, cynical and unclouded by misty-eyed nostalgia.

    @Sue aitch – ok, just repeating the point Grade and others made – that for years that was the viewer-entry postcode for Swap Shop, Blue Peter etc and is associated with TVC. As for It's not even as though TVC is being scheduled for demolition  well… Studio 1, the main ring and parts of the 1980s/90s wings will be kept but much of the ring and all of the outer buildings will go.




    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Not on i-player 
    It's down as 'coming soon' -- it's unusually slow for it not to be up already, but it should be there soon.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by banjax (U14499510) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    The postcode for TVC is W12 7RJ and has been for ages.

    There are lots of BBC PO Boxes at the Shepherds Bush Delivery Office that need cancelling an 'all.

    I do not believe the decsion to sell TVC was wrong, particularly when it was admitted no Drama output had been made from any of the Studios after 1994.

    if Penelope Keith, who observied the areas that had moved to Salford, and Brian Blessed would care to pop over to BBC Roath Lock's state of the art Drama facilities, they might not be so mournful of all that has passed.

    It's not even as though TVC is being scheduled for demolition. Studios 1-3 will be back and people will be able to visit those Wood Lane premises again after the refurb,

     
    At the risk of being pedantic when I worked at TVC the postcode that was given at the end of a broadcast for viewers to contact the programme was W12 8QT. The postcode on BBC headed notepaper had the postcode W12 7RJ. It may have been to allow mail from the general public to be processed by a particular department at the much missed TVC.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Not pedantic, banjax; that's what I assumed, thanks. It's quite common for multiple postcodes to end up at the same building for just the reason you cite. Postcodes don't just identify a geographical location - they are often used to support workflow. We do it at my work.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I think the BBC are making a huge mistake.

    It was the iconic epicentre of 'Auntie Beeb' ..where stars, producers, directors, writers etc.. of all ilks came together in green rooms and the BBC canteenand sparked off ideas and inspirations together creating iconic things like Monty Python, Only Fools And Horses etc....that won't happen now that the BBC has been fragmented round the
    country into different 'departments'

    Now it will become just another faceless media monster with no heart and no soul

    When me and my friend as 17 year olds in 1979 came to London for the day from Blackpool we only came to see the BBC and it was so exciting seeing that famous building

    There must be so many ghosts in those corridors and studios....Eric Morecambe, Ernie Wise, Ronnie Barker, Eric Sykes, Tony Hancock, Jack Warner, Roy Castle, Richard Briers to name but a few

    You never miss what you have got till it's gone and when it's gone it's too late

    I have shed a tear watching Michael Grades programme on BBC4 tonight

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Lurkalot (U15611853) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    I wonder what will happen to jimmy saville's dressing room? Ofcourse according to bbc, initially they didn't know anything happened there! smiley - doh

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by ARENA (U3567614) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    I will miss the old place...............
    used to spend hours in the canteen whilst Mrs A was filming....

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It'll always be W12 8QT to me.smiley - sadface

    Sad, interesting and by the end, it turned into a sort of Newsnight/Question Time.......Danny Baker was so right in everything he said, about it closing down, all the people talking seemed to have the same view as Danny, that it was a Bad decision.

    TVC was the Heart & Soul of the BBC.....where is it now.smiley - sadface


    Liked Brain Blessed's contribution too.smiley - winkeye

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Tony (U14390182) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    I wonder what will happen to jimmy saville's dressing room? Ofcourse according to bbc, initially they didn't know anything happened there! smiley - doh  I blame slimy Saville as this seems to be a similar reaction as happened with Fred West's (mass murderer etc.) house if so; I think we should be toldsmiley - smiley

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Alsdouble (U524298) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    BBC TVC is one of the most famous places in the civilised world. And has done so much for so many in the world. To close it and dispose of it is unthinkable.

    Bad move. VERY!

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Radioactiveoldduffer (U4768882) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    With the exception of Sir David no one thought the closure of the TVC was the right thing to do just as many pointed out that you wouldn't even think about closing down a national institution like the Royal Opera House. There's lot of talk about new technology being the prime mover but there's no rational reason why you couldn't revamp the TVC instead of expensive building work at BBC Centre.
    Salford has proved a mistake and the expenses involved in the move have proved a disaster yet the BBC it seems cannot furnish any facts and figures to justify the decisions made and more importantly why. Selling the building, it is hoped, will save £20m a year, enough to pay for 30 hours of high-quality drama.
    Note the word hoped and the savings which with billions of revenue is paltry.
    Here's a list of the BBC property portfolio ( many will be rented no doubt) but there still are running costs involved however small.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    I just cannot see a logical reason for leaving White City.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Sue_Aitch (U3336990) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It'll always be W12 8QT to me.smiley - sadface

    Sad, interesting and by the end, it turned into a sort of Newsnight/Question Time.......Danny Baker was so right in everything he said, about it closing down, all the people talking seemed to have the same view as Danny, that it was a Bad decision.

    TVC was the Heart & Soul of the BBC.....where is it now.smiley - sadface


    Liked Brain Blessed's contribution too.smiley - winkeye 
    Danny was always going to be supported in his Points of View by that self-selecting audience.

    The same Heart and Soul argument was around a whole back about Bush House, but lo and behold the survivnig staff of World Service make great programmes at New Broadcasting House now.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    According to this article from the Independent newspaper the former chairman of the BBC, 2004 to 2006, Michael Grade, is all in favour of witnessing the apparently dilapidated White City, BBC Television Centre, actually close down.

    www.independent.co.u...

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Tony (U14390182) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    BBC TVC is one of the most famous places in the civilised world. And has done so much for so many in the world. To close it and dispose of it is unthinkable.

    Bad move. VERY! 
    Just a small observation, the building did NOTHING the People who did & do work there what is important and their talents/abilities are not altered.. In actual fact,
    having spent many, many hours there I think it was an ill thought designs.
    The canteens were good though.
    PS: if you want History BBC house in Langham Place & the now defunct Aldwyce building have much more.smiley - smiley

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Bouillaguet (U14312340) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    BBC TVC is one of the most famous places in the civilised world. And has done so much for so many in the world. To close it and dispose of it is unthinkable.

    Bad move. VERY! 
    Just a small observation, the building did NOTHING the People who did & do work there what is important and their talents/abilities are not altered.. In actual fact,
    having spent many, many hours there I think it was an ill thought designs.
    The canteens were good though.
    PS: if you want History BBC house in Langham Place & the now defunct Aldwyce building have much more.smiley - smiley 
    What a load of fuss abut a place that's not even that old. I was much sadder when the White City Stadium was demolished to make way for the monstrosity that became TVC - I always thought it an ugly building and won't be sorry to see it go.

    As said, it's the people and not the building that either make or break a programme.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    BBC TVC is one of the most famous places in the civilised world. And has done so much for so many in the world. To close it and dispose of it is unthinkable.

    Bad move. VERY! 
    Just a small observation, the building did NOTHING the People who did & do work there what is important and their talents/abilities are not altered.. In actual fact,
    having spent many, many hours there I think it was an ill thought designs.
    The canteens were good though.
    PS: if you want History BBC house in Langham Place & the now defunct Aldwyce building have much more.smiley - smiley 
    What a load of fuss abut a place that's not even that old. I was much sadder when the White City Stadium was demolished to make way for the monstrosity that became TVC - I always thought it an ugly building and won't be sorry to see it go.

    As said, it's the people and not the building that either make or break a programme. 

    The TV Centre isn't actually on the stadium land, the stadium wasn't demolished till 1984 and it has been replaced with housing, offices and a large car park

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    @Tony – surely you don’t think the surroundings where people work play no part at all in their mood and productivity?

    @Bouillaguet – White City stadium wasn’t demolished to make way for TVC; the original TVC had a smaller ‘tail’ to the famous question mark plan and was close to but didn’t meet the stadium, which lasted until 1985. You might be confusing TVC with the ugly 1980s BBC White City complex.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Bouillaguet (U14312340) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    @Tony – surely you don’t think the surroundings where people work play no part at all in their mood and productivity?

    @Bouillaguet – White City stadium wasn’t demolished to make way for TVC; the original TVC had a smaller ‘tail’ to the famous question mark plan and was close to but didn’t meet the stadium, which lasted until 1985. You might be confusing TVC with the ugly 1980s BBC White City complex.
     
    I stand corrected, still didn't like the TVC building though and can't see what all the fuss is about!

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Sue_Aitch (U3336990) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    A bit off topic, but the 1908 London Olympics held at White City were the only Olympic Games where we topped the medal table. www.bbc.co.uk/histor...

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It's not the Television Centre building that needs demolishing, but some of the old "has been" comedians / presenters that need to actually go and finally retire.

    Goodbye Television Centre was really nothing more than a hastily put together cut and paste job of a light entertainment television programme.

    Anything will the likes of boring old Michael Grade, Ronnie Corbet, Bruce Forsyth, Terry Wogan, David Jason and Penelope Keith going down memory lane and reiminiscing about the so-called "golden years", is nothing more than a total turn off as far as I am concerned.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It's not the Television Centre building that needs demolishing, but some of the old "has been" comedians / presenters that need to actually go and finally retire.

    Goodbye Television Centre was really nothing more than a hastily put together cut and paste job of a light entertainment television programme.

    Anything will the likes of boring old Michael Grade, Ronnie Corbet, Bruce Forsyth, Terry Wogan, David Jason and Penelope Keith going down memory lane and reiminiscing about the so-called "golden years", is nothing more than a total turn off as far as I am concerned.  
    I thought the opposite and wasn't interested in Philip Schofield, Chris Hollins, Fiona Bruce etc.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    No probs smiley - ok Each to his own, of course, and as an architecture writer I’m obviously biased but it’s a wonderfully clever design – as well as the expansion potential planned-in from the start, the ring of studios gives the shortest possible distance between support functions and stages whilst also allowing vehicle access via a perimeter road – and the Contemporary styling is superb: exposed brick, multi-coloured mosaic both inside and out, coloured window panels, a cantilevered staircase that rises for many floors without touching the stairwell sides, ‘Festival lettering’, a vast mosaic wall by the prolific John Piper, using glass, ceramic and porcelain from Italy, Sweden and India…. It’s great.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by LadyAlice (U2796582) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013


    I worked there in the 1960s and '70s - it was an amazing place to be, exciting and vibrant. I actually visited the building as an ordinary Jo(sephine) Public on a tour a few weeks ago, along with a number of Norwegian teenagers and a couple of old buffers like me who probably worked there too and were also wandering around to say goodbye.

    I watched last night's programme with great enjoyment, nostalgia and a deal of regret.

    Hope Salford works...


    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013


    I agree wholeheartedly

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It's not the Television Centre building that needs demolishing, but some of the old "has been" comedians / presenters that need to actually go and finally retire.

    Goodbye Television Centre was really nothing more than a hastily put together cut and paste job of a light entertainment television programme.

    Anything will the likes of boring old Michael Grade, Ronnie Corbet, Bruce Forsyth, Terry Wogan, David Jason and Penelope Keith going down memory lane and reiminiscing about the so-called "golden years", is nothing more than a total turn off as far as I am concerned.  
    I thought the opposite and wasn't interested in Philip Schofield, Chris Hollins, Fiona Bruce etc. 

    I meant to say I agree to this post !!

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by FleetingEileenM (U14106338) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    I think the BBC are making a huge mistake.

    It was the iconic epicentre of 'Auntie Beeb' ..where stars, producers, directors, writers etc.. of all ilks came together in green rooms and the BBC canteenand sparked off ideas and inspirations together creating iconic things like Monty Python, Only Fools And Horses etc....that won't happen now that the BBC has been fragmented round the
    country into different 'departments'

    Now it will become just another faceless media monster with no heart and no soul.

    There must be so many ghosts in those corridors and studios....Eric Morecambe, Ernie Wise, Ronnie Barker, Eric Sykes, Tony Hancock, Jack Warner, Roy Castle, Richard Briers to name but a few

    You never miss what you have got till it's gone and when it's gone it's too late

    I have shed a tear watching Michael Grade's programme on BBC4 tonight  


    Well said Nick. I never worked there but used to visit quite often in my BBC days when security was less tight in the days before the IRA became active on mainland Britain in the early 1970s. It was great to wander around quite freely, going into the observation rooms overlooking the various studios to see what was happening, spending time in the canteen, the club etc.

    The building is not just bricks and mortar. Having almost all the strands of a TV production happening on the same premises where many people involved in other very different programmes could meet on purpose or by chance could only have made it an inspirational place to work.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    To keep TV centre would be a real indulgence. You don't need to bring people to a building to make a TV progamme, you go to them. If you want opera or ballet for example you go to an opera house as modern equipment allows you to do that, you don't make it in a TV studio. If you want stand up comedy you go to the Apollo or a regional theatre and there are many other examples. Times change.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    To keep TV centre would be a real indulgence. You don't need to bring people to a building to make a TV progamme, you go to them. If you want opera or ballet for example you go to an opera house as modern equipment allows you to do that, you don't make it in a TV studio. If you want stand up comedy you go to the Apollo or a regional theatre and there are many other examples. Times change.  This was much more interesting than I expected. I expected a load of clips linked by talking heads saying how wonderful it all was. I was very surprised at how many of the guests were quite openly critical of the decision to close TV Centre.

    How nice it would have been to end the evening with a BBC Christmas tape, well past watershed, especially 1979, a bit more than a case of Aunite's Bloomers!

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by megamain (U12800305) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Watched and enjoyed the 8 comedians talking, but lost interest after that when the 'presenters' came on.

     

    I was the other way round: the presenters were of more interest to me. 
    It is my imagination or was Bruce trying to out talk all the others making it just about HIM? 
    Dammit, I was about to watch this on iPlayer then you mentioned the 'B' word... smiley - sadface

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    Watched and enjoyed the 8 comedians talking, but lost interest after that when the 'presenters' came on.

     

    I was the other way round: the presenters were of more interest to me. 
    It is my imagination or was Bruce trying to out talk all the others making it just about HIM? 
    Dammit, I was about to watch this on iPlayer then you mentioned the 'B' word... smiley - sadface 
    If by the B word, you're talking about Bruce Forsyth, he's on for a very few minutes of a two hour programme, so if you want to see it, don't be put off by a tiny part of it.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Tony (U14390182) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    @Tony – surely you don’t think the surroundings where people work play no part at all in their mood and productivity?

    @Bouillaguet – White City stadium wasn’t demolished to make way for TVC; the original TVC had a smaller ‘tail’ to the famous question mark plan and was close to but didn’t meet the stadium, which lasted until 1985. You might be confusing TVC with the ugly 1980s BBC White City complex.
     
    Well Chris I really hope not too much especially now everyone is expected to
    work in gun/drug capital of the UKsmiley - smiley

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Vizzer aka U_numbers (U2011621) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It was the iconic epicentre of 'Auntie Beeb' ..where stars, producers, directors, writers etc.. of all ilks came together in green rooms and the BBC canteenand sparked off ideas and inspirations together creating iconic things things like Monty Python, Only Fools And Horses etc 
    Yes. Who could forget the time in 1997 when Chief Commissioning Editor of BBC Television Tony Hayers was having lunch with Chat Show Host Alan Partridge when Revamper of Current Affairs Peter Linehan dropped by. Some of Alan's suggestions for new programs were just sublime:

    i) 'Swallow' - a detective series based in Norwich

    ii) 'Alan Attack' - like 'The Cook Report' but with a more slapstick approach

    iii) 'Arm Wrestling with Chas & Dave'

    iv) 'Knowing M.E., Knowing You' - Alan Partridge talks to M.E. sufferers about the condition, intersperse it with their favourite pop songs, make it light-hearted, give them a platform, you've got to keep the energy up

    v) 'Inner-city Sumo' - take fat people from the inner cities, put them in big nappies and then get them to throw each other out of a circle drawn with chalk on the ground. Very cheap to make. Do it in a pub car park

    vi) 'Cooking in Prison'

    vii) 'A Partridge Amongst the Pigeons' - it's just a title, opening sequence, Alan in Trafalgar Square, feeding the pigeons, going "Oh God!"

    viii) 'Youth Hostelling with Chris Eubank'

    ix) 'Monkey Tennis'

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It was the iconic epicentre of 'Auntie Beeb' ..where stars, producers, directors, writers etc.. of all ilks came together in green rooms and the BBC canteenand sparked off ideas and inspirations together creating iconic things like Monty Python, Only Fools And Horses etc....that won't happen now that the BBC has been fragmented round the country into different 'departments'  That's a lovely romantic notion but I suspect totally wrong. Monty Python came out of Oxbridge and John Sullivan who wrote Only Fools and Horses was a working class lad. They were poles apart.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Radioactiveoldduffer (U4768882) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    To keep TV centre would be a real indulgence. You don't need to bring people to a building to make a TV progamme, you go to them. If you want opera or ballet for example you go to an opera house as modern equipment allows you to do that, you don't make it in a TV studio. If you want stand up comedy you go to the Apollo or a regional theatre and there are many other examples. Times change.  To keep TV centre would be a real indulgence?

    £180 million (probably much more) to move staff from TVC and equip Salford. Building costs of at least £1 billion pounds for Broadcasting House to relocate news staff etc from TVC and radio staff from Bush House (not owned by the BBC).

    Add to this that staff on studio and post production will move back to TVC after refurbishment and it seems a very expensive merry go round.

    This is what the BBC in their own words will save:

    The proceeds from the sale, together with the reduction in running costs from operating Television Centre, will contribute towards the BBC's target of achieving annual savings in property expenditure of £47m a year by 2016/17. That's property savings not what's within the buildings.

    The figures don't stack up. What would you call just two (of the many) pieces of art costing over £2.5 million in the new Broadcasting centre if not indulgence?

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by FirstClassMaleUK (U15658867) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    I will miss the old place...............
    used to spend hours in the canteen whilst Mrs A was filming....

     
    Rather than quoting Nick Brighton, I'm quoting the above as both epitomise the sentiment.

    I have mixed feelings (Multicoloured) Swap Shop, Phillip Schofield before the grey hair and a host of others. I'm surprised that there was no mention of the Blue Peter Garden in the programme or in comments so far relating to it. The tribute programme gave very little over to the building itself. Call me the geek if you like but I'd have loved to know how many miles of cable, total cameras, the weight limit of studio one in tonnes OR in elephant poop.
    I enjoyed the post code and, of course 01 811 80 55 (hopefully that won't get me banned from here) but, due to my location, these were likely that small boy's only chance to interact....
    I live in North East Scotland, "popping along" was never an option for me. About to turn 40, I still have not visited T VC, despite visiting London (and three other continents of the world) several times. The fact is that, if you look at the shape of the building, it does rather reinforce the argument of London Centric attitudes and programming.

    As a building, I think that it should probably get a listed status, as another BBC programme recently pointed out that the system is not confined to very old buildings. The Lloyds Building being a case in point.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 23rd March 2013

    It was the iconic epicentre of 'Auntie Beeb' ..where stars, producers, directors, writers etc.. of all ilks came together in green rooms and the BBC canteenand sparked off ideas and inspirations together creating iconic things like Monty Python, Only Fools And Horses etc....that won't happen now that the BBC has been fragmented round the country into different 'departments'  That's a lovely romantic notion but I suspect totally wrong. Monty Python came out of Oxbridge and John Sullivan who wrote Only Fools and Horses was a working class lad. They were poles apart.
     
    Monty Python didn't come straight out of Oxbridge, not at all in the case of Terry Gilliam. The other five progressed through a variety of shows like The Frost Report, At Last The 1948 Show, Do Not Adjust Your Setand The Complete and Utter History of Britain.

    The beginnings of Python did show how much more prepared the BBC used to be to take risks. With very little in the way of ideas, they were given 13 shows!

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Andy (U2269368) on Sunday, 24th March 2013

    I enjoyed this, but I would have liked fewer back-slapping celebs and more stuff from the archives about the building itself. I'm old enough to remember when the BBC was still making a big thing of TVC and I'm sure there were lots of short films about it, often in the form of short inserts dropped into children's programmes.
    Moving on, well said Danny Baker. I must say he always puts a smile on my face.
    Finally, was the pic quality a bit sub par? They had filmised it (WHY?) and it looked a little rough and grainy to me.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by banjax (U14499510) on Sunday, 24th March 2013

    I noticed that too Andy. An unnecessary and inappropriate use of the filmic effect.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by GaryB007 (U3895241) on Sunday, 24th March 2013

    I wast just going to post about the filmic effect too. It seems ridiculous to use it on a programme that was celebrating TELEVISION. It always looks wrong when used on studio based programmes, but here it was sheer incompetence on the part of the producers.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Sunday, 24th March 2013

    It was the iconic epicentre of 'Auntie Beeb' ..where stars, producers, directors, writers etc.. of all ilks came together in green rooms and the BBC canteenand sparked off ideas and inspirations together creating iconic things things like Monty Python, Only Fools And Horses etc 
    Yes. Who could forget the time in 1997 when Chief Commissioning Editor of BBC Television Tony Hayers was having lunch with Chat Show Host Alan Partridge when Revamper of Current Affairs Peter Linehan dropped by. Some of Alan's suggestions for new programs were just sublime:

    i) 'Swallow' - a detective series based in Norwich

    ii) 'Alan Attack' - like 'The Cook Report' but with a more slapstick approach

    iii) 'Arm Wrestling with Chas & Dave'

    iv) 'Knowing M.E., Knowing You' - Alan Partridge talks to M.E. sufferers about the condition, intersperse it with their favourite pop songs, make it light-hearted, give them a platform, you've got to keep the energy up

    v) 'Inner-city Sumo' - take fat people from the inner cities, put them in big nappies and then get them to throw each other out of a circle drawn with chalk on the ground. Very cheap to make. Do it in a pub car park

    vi) 'Cooking in Prison'

    vii) 'A Partridge Amongst the Pigeons' - it's just a title, opening sequence, Alan in Trafalgar Square, feeding the pigeons, going "Oh God!"

    viii) 'Youth Hostelling with Chris Eubank'

    ix) 'Monkey Tennis' 
    I still think 'Swallow' should have been picked up by the other side!

    Report message50

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