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The Review Show

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Messages: 1 - 49 of 49
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Turner (U14992668) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    Now reduced from weekly to a measly monthly programme, and moved from BBC2 to BBC Four, making the already inadequate and laughably scarce presence of arts programme on the BBC even more ridiculous.

    Wow, way to go, BBC smiley - doh



    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    What!! Are they mad?? smiley - steam

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    I thought the programme was better when it was part of "Newsnight." This seemed to make the panel's comments worth watching as a bit of entertaining topical chatter.

    I think when it became a separate programme, its deficiencies became more obvious. The main weakness being that only one of the panel members usually has the specialist knowledge to give an informed opinion on a new film, play or art exhibition. The opinions of the rest of them aren't worth any more than our own would be . . . . unless, that is, such panelists are very interesting and entertaining speakers in their own right, as Tom Paulin used to be,

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Turner (U14992668) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    I agree that the programme hasn't been all it could be for a while, and that it probably needed a bit of a revamp, but that's exactly what it needed - a revamp.
    Reducing it to a monthly hour programme and shunting off to BBCFour certainly want improve things, and will deprive art lovers of this treasured weekly rendez-vous with ideas, happening, events in the world of arts.

    Bad move.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Turner (U14992668) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    Flippin' predictive text smiley - grr - "*won't* improve things"

    And flippin' 3 minutes wait smiley - grr smiley - grr smiley - grr

    smiley - laugh

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013


    Why will it deprive art lovers Turner?

    Won't people just watch it on BBC4?

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Turner (U14992668) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    But now it's going to be only once a month, instead of every Friday night, Peta.

    It's hard enough to cover all the vast panorama of events in literature, theatre, music, exhibitions etc in one hour per week; one hour per month is simply impossible, especially now that even the Culture Show and other arts show have been scaled down

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    It's gone from weekly to monthly. smiley - sadface

    What will be on after Friday's Newsnight instead?

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013


    Thanks - got it now!

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    It's gone from weekly to monthly. smiley - sadface

    What will be on after Friday's Newsnight instead? 


    "Another chance to see" something that was on earlier in the week?

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Flibbertigibbit (U6142957) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    Perhaps they'll extend fearless investigative programme Newsnight to the same length as Monday to Friday.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Flibbertigibbit (U6142957) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    Oops. I meant to say Monday to Thursday, bien sur.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Someone should give Kirsty Wark's season ticket to Suzy Klein, and Paul Morley's season ticket to Tom Paulin.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Someone should give Kirsty Wark's season ticket to Suzy Klein, and Paul Morley's season ticket to Tom Paulin.  I'd vote for Suzy Klein! Also the return of Tom Paulin who seemed to be sent into the wilderness by the BBC after he made an intemperate remark concerning Middle-East politics.

    One can sometimes ask oneself what is the point of Paul Morley, but I would prefer Mark Kermode to be ousted as I find his gabbling about cinema rather irritating. However, I realise I am in a minority over that as Kermode seems to be immensely popular.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Sarah Churchwell desperately needs a hairclip - she'll get RSI if she keeps swatting her hair out of her eye.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by beatxt (U14042175) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Given the scope for review coverage across film, music, tv, books, art and theatre - and ideally a move away from being primarily London, Manchester and Glasgow/Edinburgh-centric - this show could be on every night, let alone once a week. Going monthly is a ridiculous backward step.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I have come to the conclusion that the acting director general at the BBC, Tim Davie, and his entourage, must both loath and detest films, arts and culture in today's contemporary society. For programmes like The Review Show, and Film 2013, seem to be the first victims of the BBC's new austerity measures, or stringent budget cuts.

    Combined this with the BBC's overall policy, and desire, of perpetually dumbing-down everything so as to compete in the "ratings war commercial world", I now fear that it is just really a matter of time before any arts or culture programmes on BBC television will no longer exist.

    www.guardian.co.uk/m...

    www.telegraph.co.uk/...

    www.independent.co.u...

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I can see why they would decide to move it, a programme for, ahem, how shall we put this, let us say not the most brutal of viewers, those who like to listen to a few different people talk interestingly about various art topics, to BBC4. After all, BBC1 is lowest common denominator, and BBC2 is the same these days, and BBC4 is actually the channel for Review viewers.
    But to also stop it being weekly at the same time? Where is the logic in that?

    If it were on BBC2 monthly and moved it to BBC4 and make it weekly, that is consistent with the stratification that is becoming the norm.

    The fact is that there is a significant audience for people who like talk, and who remember fondly the short lived After Dark. If Review is to be monthly, I would like to see others interleaved with it, say on science, medecine, internationalism, religion, music, and so on. The only rule I 'd like is that nobody on it is very often on anything else.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Bandy Kneesborough (U2259308) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Hm, might I suggest that the few viewers who like to "listen to a few people talk interestingly about various art topics" might like to try listening to Radio 4's various daily or weekly offerings.

    Or would such an idea on a messageboard devoted to TV not be acceptable?

    (Just landed from the defunct Archers boards, so just feeling me way...)

    Bandy

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    The Archers has got a lot to answer for - pushing Front Row to an inconvenient 19:15 timeslot.
    Presumably budging The Archers is unthinkable - so the repeat of the Woman's Hour Drama should go to 19:15-19:30, with Front Row at 19:30.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    The fact is that there is a significant audience for people who like talk, and who remember fondly the short lived After Dark.   I can still remember staying up for Udi Eichler's 'Voices'.

    What's Michael Ignatieff doing these days? smiley - winkeye

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Turner (U14992668) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Given the scope for review coverage across film, music, tv, books, art and theatre - and ideally a move away from being primarily London, Manchester and Glasgow/Edinburgh-centric - this show could be on every night, let alone once a week. Going monthly is a ridiculous backward step. 

    Absolutely. The Review Show is a 'topical' show about current events in the world of the arts; given the scope of the programme's remit, the weekly slot was barely adequate already, which makes the demotion to one hour a month even more hard to comprehend.
    It's hard not to see this as nothing but a (not very successful) ploy to get around axing the programme altogether, and avoid the inevitable criticism.

    The Review Show has always been the BBC's flagship arts and culture programme; I hear that BBC Four controller Richard Klein has said that "Arts, music and culture have always served as the backbone of BBC Four but this year we're increasing our commitment to topical arts". So how does the downgrading of this flagship programme fit into this statement? And what does it say about the current BBC's vision as a broadcaster - not to mention its wonderfully ironically named 'Putting Quality First' strategy?

    Oh well.

    Enjoy tonight's edition folks, it should be a corker - reviewed are the Tate Modern's Lichtenstein retrospective, 'Arbitrage', Jeremy Irons-starring documentary 'Trashed', James Lasdun's 'Give Me Everything You Have : On Being Stalked', and Sue Perkins new sitcom 'Heading Out'.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Much as I love listening to cultural commentators rabbiting on about things I haven't yet seen or experienced - and so have little to gauge their supposedly expert opinions against (I do - honest) - it is necessary that they be entertaining for this to work. Increasingly that has not been the case with this programme I think.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Much as I love listening to cultural commentators rabbiting on about things I haven't yet seen or experienced - and so have little to gauge their supposedly expert opinions against (I do - honest) - it is necessary that they be entertaining for this to work. Increasingly that has not been the case with this programme I think.  Supposedly expert? Given yourself away there. If you want what you call 'entertainment' watch the Graham Norton show where he tips people out of a chair. It's hilarious.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    If you want what you call 'entertainment' watch the Graham Norton show.  

    I agree - Graham Norton is hilarious! What's your point? Tom Paulin used to perform much the same comedy function as I recall, except less coherently.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Ekow Eshun - now there was a comedian! How I miss the good old days.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Ekow Eshun - now there was a comedian! How I miss the good old days.  Don't forget Kwame Kwei-Armah aka Ian Roberts! smiley - smiley

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Richard Klein, BBC4 controller: "...we have to rethink how we review topical arts; you could argue once a month or once a week, it doesn't make that much difference."

    Funny, that's what my wife always says...

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by beatxt (U14042175) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    I forgot to include radio in my list.

    I enjoy hearing critics I love - and hate - discussing items, most of which I'll never see but some of which I will try to see/read, or seek to find out more about, because of this exposure. And where there is a visual component relying on Radio 4, as someone above suggests, just doesn't cut it.

    That sounds like a pretty core function for a public service broadcaster.

    It's all got a bit Scottish clique-y since they moved it to Scotland though.
    The classic days of Paulin and Greer were good, but I also miss John Harris, Portillo and even - er - Gove (probably a better critic than a minister ?!)

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by goodhelenstar (U13943062) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    It's all got a bit Scottish clique-y since they moved it to Scotland though.  What an odd thing to say. Last night's panel were Alex Preston (who tried to shoehorn as many big words into his critiques as possible à la Will Self) and Heather McGregor, both English, and American Kerry Shale.
    The classic days of Paulin and Greer were good, but I also miss John Harris, Portillo and even - er - Gove (probably a better critic than a minister ?!)
     
    That I do agree with. Germaine Greer does appear occasionally but as far as I know Tom Paulin hasn't been on for years. Michael Gove was a witty and entertaining arts critic, though it may be damning by faint praise to say he was a better critic than he is a minister!

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    >>>weekly rendez-vous with ideas, happening, events in the world of arts>> ... in London.

    smiley - winkeye

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Reservoir Hamster (U14288323) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    The fact is that there is a significant audience for people who like talk, and who remember fondly the short lived After Dark. 
    Ah, After Dark, my favourite-ever TV programme. Oliver Reed and a few bottles of wine.

    I agree with Johnbee. I like talk. Real talk. Serious talk. And not just on radio. I want to see the pundits themselves on my TV screen. And I don't want it once a month, I want it once a week - at least.

    My own favourite Review critic is John Carey. You nearly always learn something interesting when you listen to his intelligent contributions. His book on John Donne is one of my most treasured books. And I also agree with other posters who have said good things about Tom Paulin and Michael Gove.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    It's all got a bit Scottish clique-y since they moved it to Scotland though.
    The classic days of Paulin and Greer were good, but I also miss John Harris, Portillo and even - er - Gove (probably a better critic than a minister ?!)  
    It's become a forty-fine minute chinwag. Bring back Saturday Review, with Sarah Dunant, Hermione Lee, Minette Marrin and that chap with the beard who used to play the trumpet.

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    I'm hoping they don't use the longer format to include more musical performances.
    I don't hang around for the ones they have at the end of the current shows.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    and that chap with the beard who used to play the trumpet.  Oops!

    I mean the trombone, and his name is Russell Davies.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Bring back Saturday Review, with Sarah Dunant, Hermione Lee, Minette Marrin and that chap with the beard who used to play the trumpet.  

    Ah Sarah Dunant! She's a Lady Novelist nowadays. I didn't much care for her as a TV performer. She was rather smug and, when interviewing novelists or film directors, always asked very long questions which allowed the interviewee little opportunity to say anything. She would start her questions with "Wouldn't you say that . . ." or "Do you agree with me that your new film . . . " smiley - biggrin

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Stop the reminiscing! I'm having Muriel Gray flashbacks smiley - yikes.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    She crazy woman!

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by singer (U15634681) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    I'm hoping they don't use the longer format to include more musical performances.
    I don't hang around for the ones they have at the end of the current shows. 
    The Review Show talks about film, books, art, theatre all of them very interesting and I enjoy their serious approach. But classical music - ooh dear me no! Last year Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau had the good manners to die on a Friday morning. Could the Review Show find 40, 30 oh, all right then, 29 seconds to mention this and play us out with his singing Strauss or Schubert - could it heck! May it never be forgiven!

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    They did have a clip of van Cliburn at the end of last night's show.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Going_once (U14931925) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    How about doing the opposite and getting risky on BBC4 and returning to Late Night Line-Up, live every night? They used to find lots of stuff to talk about, back when BBC2 was the serious channel.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    The producers of The Review Show should provide their guests with 'twiglets'; a wheat-based snack that's high in fibre.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    Going,
    Nice idea.
    But do we have a 'serious' audience ?

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    I cannot remember BBC Two's Late Night Line Up, as I am far too young, but I do recollect Channel 4's The Late Show.

    If one of the guests actually consumed far too much alcohol, then it could easily descend into uncontrolled car crash television.

    Just look at this example of Keith Allen below.

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    Yes, I can think of several people I'd like to hear on a late night review show, but Keith Allen isn't one of them.

    Anyone remember Stephen Fry nominating late night review shows for Room 101?

    When our tv critic is dead, and St Peter asks them what they did with their life, our tv critic is going to say:

    'Well, I looked at stuff that other people did and I said 'that doesn't really work'.

    And on about five different levels. (Only five? I counted at least seven! smiley - winkeye )

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by SquiddlyDiddly (U15632483) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    and yet here I am, behaving just like a tv critic. Oh the irony!smiley - winkeye

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by pinkcardi (U13786532) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    I enjoyed the show from Glasgow as each week I delighted in swerving camera moves, jerky close-ups, followed by rapid pull outs. You wouldn't believe that four static people could create so much excitement.
    Then the added pleasure of listening to Kirsty Wark talk over her guests as if her opinion was worth more than anyone else.
    Yes please to Suzy Klein or Martha Carney but the programme needs a re think in its present form, it needs putting out of its misery.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Hy Dranger (U14569978) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    I just listen to Front Row on Radio 4 these days. Going back to when the Review Show was Late Review on BBC2, it was always Mark Lawson's skilful herding of the reviewer cats that made it work, once he left it went downhill as no-one else could really make the format work. Unfortunately he isn't always the presenter on Front Row either these days but anyhow that's where the serious arts coverage is now IMHO.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Going_once (U14931925) on Sunday, 3rd March 2013

    Going,
    Nice idea.
    But do we have a 'serious' audience ? 
    We are still out here but we don't have much to chew on these days. I used to listen to Front Row but it's not the same as having meaty interviews and in-depth reviews but I agree it's the only viable candidate. The Review Show just gets on my wick and I don't think it being on for an hour once a month is going to make it any better.

    Report message49

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