BBC Television programmes  permalink

Wild Arabia

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 51 - 65 of 65
  • Message 51

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Vizzer aka U_numbers (U2011621) on Tuesday, 5th March 2013

    I'm also getting fed up of timelapse sequences now, they are becoming a cliche. Especially when they are so obviously doctored in post-production like this week's. 
    Couldn't agree less.

    This was one program where the time-lapse sequence actually had relevance. Unlike the sand dunes film in the Africa series (which was a bit of a yawn) in this program the contrast of green Dhofar and dry Dhofar was truly shocking. Donegal became Mauretania in a few short weeks. A stark image.

    P.S. All images are 'doctored' in post-production - by definition.

    Report message1

  • Message 52

    , in reply to message 51.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Tuesday, 5th March 2013

    I'm also getting fed up of timelapse sequences now, they are becoming a cliche. Especially when they are so obviously doctored in post-production like this week's. 
    Couldn't agree less.

    This was one program where the time-lapse sequence actually had relevance. Unlike the sand dunes film in the Africa series (which was a bit of a yawn) in this program the contrast of green Dhofar and dry Dhofar was truly shocking. Donegal became Mauretania in a few short weeks. A stark image.

    P.S. All images are 'doctored' in post-production - by definition. 
    I agree Vizzer, personally I will never tire of time-lapse sequences and, as you say, these were absolute crackers, with the cameras moving as well as the subject matter.



    Did someone critisise the narration up thread too smiley - yikes I thought it was superb (sorry Sir David) but it was better than "Africa" IMHO

    Report message2

  • Message 53

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Wednesday, 6th March 2013

    I loved the technique they devised of following the two conservationists as a way of introducing the footage of the big carnivores, which the BBC would have had a hard time getting themselves. 

    That was slightly misleading I think - most of the wild cat footage was clearly filmed with professional camera gear but mixed up with the poorer quality Bushnell trail cam material in the edit. An odd decision.

    Agree with some of the other comments above. I too was disappointed to hear another reference to "special filming techniques" which immediately took me out of the scene and wondering about how it was filmed. Totally unnecessary. 

    Not at all. It's documentary not fantasy.

    I'm also getting fed up of timelapse sequences now, they are becoming a cliche. Especially when they are so obviously doctored in post-production like this week's. 

    This was not the usual pointless cliche - it served a clear purpose which could not have been achieved in any other way. It was revelatory in this context. I'm not sure the extent to which it was "doctored" but it didn't bother me especially.

    Report message3

  • Message 54

    , in reply to message 53.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Wednesday, 6th March 2013

    I think it likely that the majority of us simply watch and enjoy without getting distracted by technical matters.

    Report message4

  • Message 55

    , in reply to message 54.

    Posted by cjp1979 (U9972316) on Wednesday, 6th March 2013

    I think so too, but in my case the distraction was prompted by the narrator! Leave the "this is how we filmed this animal" bits for the website or the behind the scenes bolt-on part at the end. (The only reason the BBC have started dropping these references in is because of the storm in a teacup over the polar bear den sequence in Frozen Planet.)

    The visual impact of time lapses is gradually being eroded as they turn up in more and more programmes (and I'm not just talking about wildlife shows). There was a certain inevitability about Wild Arabia's greening desert, clouds whooshing past and stars circling in the night sky.

    Anyway these are minor quibbles - watch and enjoy I most certainly did. The most thrilling parts of the show were the night time sequence with the hyena surprising the wolf pack and the acrobatics of the Verreaux's eagles. Brilliant stuff!

    Report message5

  • Message 56

    , in reply to message 55.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    The end scenes of last night's episode looked as if they were someone's image of Hell! OK, Dubai has virtually squandered all of it's oil and now it's working its way through water. How incredibly short sighed. According to last night's episode the Arabian countries use more energy and water per capita that any other country in the world and both of these are finite sources. I wonder if they have thought ahead about what is going to happen to all those air conditioned buildings once the energy has run out? I don't hold out much hope for them If their thinking is advanced as this:

    forums.themavesite.c...

    I know that's difficult to believe but it was confirmed here:

    abcnews.go.com/Inter....

    Report message6

  • Message 57

    , in reply to message 56.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    Another compelling episode from a quite different angle.

    It was fairly even-handed with the pros and cons of "enlightened" development I thought. I have to assume the cities themselves are wildlife dead zones since we didn't catch a glimpse of any urban fugitives?

    The water is produced from desalination plants in that part of the world I thought, so doesn't compete with the wildlife for that resource quite so much perhaps. Heavily energy dependent obviously.

    Great underwater footage - especially the dugongs.

    Report message7

  • Message 58

    , in reply to message 53.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    One of the series producers explains how the leopard footage from the previous episode was captured for anyone who's interested:

    www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...

    A bit more sophisticated than a Bushnell! smiley - smiley

    Report message8

  • Message 59

    , in reply to message 57.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    Amazing end to this series last night.
    Loved the night scenes of Dubai, very Blade Runner like.

    Dugongs wrestling looked crazy...as was the Robot Whipping Camel Racing.smiley - yikes

    Stunning Falconry too.smiley - cool

    Report message9

  • Message 60

    , in reply to message 57.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    Another compelling episode from a quite different angle.

    It was fairly even-handed with the pros and cons of "enlightened" development I thought. I have to assume the cities themselves are wildlife dead zones since we didn't catch a glimpse of any urban fugitives?

    The water is produced from desalination plants in that part of the world I thought, so doesn't compete with the wildlife for that resource quite so much perhaps. Heavily energy dependent obviously.

    Great underwater footage - especially the dugongs. 
    All the water shown last night for irrigation came from underground, a finite resource.

    Report message10

  • Message 61

    , in reply to message 60.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    Once again, great photography - but, for me, too much human and not enough wildlife.

    My favourite of the three episodes was the middle one with hardly any humans, apart from the two biologists and the goatherding villagers.

    As a series about both people and wildlife I found 'Wild China' - which was dismissed by a couple of earlier posters - greatly superior. In that the film makers were at pains to investigate the influence that the local human population (especially their age-old traditions) and the animals around them had on each other. In 'Wild Arabia' the humans and other creatures were pretty much in separate compartments.

    Ref whale shark migration - the programme said nobody knows where they go after leaving the gulf, but I don't think that's true. Although there are a lot of details still to fill in, there's a pattern emerging of long distance migration between the Gulf, Indian ocean and western Australia:

    whale-shark.webs.com...

    Report message11

  • Message 62

    , in reply to message 61.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    Damn missed it again, is it repeated?

    Report message12

  • Message 63

    , in reply to message 62.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    Damn missed it again, is it repeated? 
    Doesn't seem so. iplayer or nothing!

    Report message13

  • Message 64

    , in reply to message 60.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    All the water shown last night for irrigation came from underground, a finite resource. 

    Well in the short term anyway! Underground aquifers must be out of reach of most wildlife also.

    Report message14

  • Message 65

    , in reply to message 60.

    Posted by Dermod (U14282701) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    "All the water shown last night for irrigation came from underground, a finite resource."

    That is a very imprecise statement! Please be careful before declaring underground water to be a 'finite resource', this is quite untrue for many aquifers near the surface. Of course water wells generally have a limited capacity to deliver in the short term but not many will dry up completely.

    Report message15

Back to top

About this Board

The Points of View team invite you to discuss BBC Television programmes.

Add basic Smileys or extra Smileys to your posts.

Questions? Check the BBC FAQ for answers first!

Go to: BBC News Have your say to discuss topics in the news

Make a complaint? Go to the BBC complaints website.

BBC News: Off-topic for this board, so contact them directly with your feedback: Contact BBC News

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.


Mon-Sat: 0900-2300
Sun: 1000-2300

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

Recent Discussions

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.