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Wild Arabia

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 65
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    Starts tonight 9.00 (England & Scotland; 9.30 NI; tomorrow 8.30 Wales):

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Dramatic scenery and creatures living in a hostile environment - should fill the gap left by 'Africa'.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    I tempted.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    ..............or even, I'm tempted.smiley - biggrin

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    By the programme - or just in general?

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    Been looking forward to this since a saw the first trailer for it.smiley - cool

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    Well the first episode was rather enchanting. Some creatures I hadn't seen before filmed exquisitely. The irrigation footage was also spellbinding.

    I guess we'll have to get used to the euphemisms "special filming tunnels" and "special filming techniques to recreate the drama of their lives" to mean staged under controlled conditions but it doesn't detract from the wonderful production skills involved. Did they also use "special filming Bedouin" I wonder?

    It was an odd choice to devote the 'Diaries' segment solely to the human scenes and a bit too slick in approach to feel truly behind-the-scenes. One day they will have to give the studio boffins their moment in the spotlight. A Foley artist at work would be a step too far obviously!

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by ashleyhr (U14203741) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    I've enjoyed this week's Miranda (diving) and Mike (otters) wildlife films on the One Show. (Also, if I'm allowed to mention them in passing, this week's Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Antarctica and Ray Mears in the Scillies films have been compelling.)

    But the first 50 minutes of Wild Arabia were a real treat. Some great reptiles, and I always love seeing bee-eaters on TV.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    I've enjoyed this week's Miranda (diving) and Mike (otters) wildlife films on the One Show. (Also, if I'm allowed to mention them in passing, this week's Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Antarctica and Ray Mears in the Scillies films have been compelling.)

    But the first 50 minutes of Wild Arabia were a real treat. Some great reptiles, and I always love seeing bee-eaters on TV. 

    I'm following Ray Mears but not The One Show - I take it Miranda is Krestovnikoff not Hart (who I love, but not in a wildlife diving context!).

    My reaction to Wild Arabia isn't totally positive I'm afraid.

    There was a line in (I think) Lawrence of Arabia - "You British have a love of desolate places", and the first programme of this series appears to be based on that premise.

    For me it fell a bit short. The wildlife was too sparse, the camels and Bedouin were interesting but not really fulfilling the "Wild" promise.

    Worst of all, I watched in HD and the D was definitely not H. It looked to me like a poor upscaling effort from archive film (or else I need new glasses - someone please tell me if they had a different experience). I should have known from the trailer, which seemed blurred.

    I can't comment on the 'making of' 10 minutes at the end - I never watch it, and wish it wasn't there.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Wonderful programme and as always, beautifully photographed. Stunning in HD.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    A great way to pass an hour. Knowledgeable and unobtrusive commentary, no personality camera hog and beautiful pictures and animals. Loved the fighting rodents but the footage of the ousted old Oryx limping off alone was sad.
    Once went on a short trek in the Sahaha guided by Bedouin, was told my camel was called Ibraham, quickly became known to me as You Bastard, they have few redeeming qualities.
    Looking forward to next week.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by MCrawford (U14684488) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    I thoroughly enjoy the last 10 minutes as well as the whole programme. I imagine that is tagged on so that the programme itself is 50 minutes which makes it marketable to the US and other countries that insist on commercial breaks.

    Other BBC programmes (The Planners and Food and Drink for example) are starting to imitate Channel 4 with their natural breaks which can be filled with ads. Personally, I find it very irritating as the producers seem to treat us like idiots with the attention span on gnats as if we cannot remember what we were watching five minutes before.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by SpartaJBcus (U15618262) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Following on from the intensely censored Wild China, once again a fine wildlife documentary is spoiled by the inclusion of 'Nanuk of the North' style phony human narratives.

    Very Orientalist and patronising. I look forward to Al Jazeera's "Wild London" featuring roaming bands of Pearly Kings and Queens and luvable Cockanees all dancing with theirbraces in their hands chanting their sacred cry of "Ave-a-Banana!"

    Just point the flippin camera at the flippin Amminuls!

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Grrrrr smiley - steam
    I have to wait until tonight, then I'll have to record it because it overlaps Spiral.

    Last night on BBC2 Wales we had a two hour rugby programme, followed by a two and a quarter hour rugby programme, followed by a half hour mainly rugby programme.

    Aren't we lucky.
    smiley - doh

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Following on from the intensely censored Wild China, once again a fine wildlife documentary is spoiled by the inclusion of 'Nanuk of the North' style phony human narratives. 
    I didn't find anything wrong or phony about the narrative.

    I'd hardly say "following on" from Wild China - it's a year since that excellent series was last repeated and 5 years since it was made. Also why do you say it was intensely censored? - I don't believe that was the case, it was made by the Beeb's natural history unit and a Chinese production company working in collaboration.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    I've enjoyed this week's Miranda (diving) and Mike (otters) wildlife films on the One Show. (Also, if I'm allowed to mention them in passing, this week's Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Antarctica and Ray Mears in the Scillies films have been compelling.)

    But the first 50 minutes of Wild Arabia were a real treat. Some great reptiles, and I always love seeing bee-eaters on TV. 

    I'm following Ray Mears but not The One Show - I take it Miranda is Krestovnikoff not Hart (who I love, but not in a wildlife diving context!).

    My reaction to Wild Arabia isn't totally positive I'm afraid.

    There was a line in (I think) Lawrence of Arabia - "You British have a love of desolate places", and the first programme of this series appears to be based on that premise.

    For me it fell a bit short. The wildlife was too sparse, the camels and Bedouin were interesting but not really fulfilling the "Wild" promise.

    Worst of all, I watched in HD and the D was definitely not H. It looked to me like a poor upscaling effort from archive film (or else I need new glasses - someone please tell me if they had a different experience). I should have known from the trailer, which seemed blurred.

    I can't comment on the 'making of' 10 minutes at the end - I never watch it, and wish it wasn't there. 
    "For me it fell a bit short. The wildlife was too sparse, the camels and Bedouin were interesting but not really fulfilling the "Wild" promise."

    The Tag line for this series, does have People in it....
    "Extraordinary wildlife, landscapes and people - Arabia is a land of magic and surprise."


    But I have to agree....the HD wasn't very HD.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013


    But I have to agree....the HD wasn't very HD.
     


    I and other saw that it was in HD - and looked very realistic .... except the obvious slo mo sequences.
    There was no archive material that I noted - and all the cameras we saw were most definitely HD.

    I viewed at about 1.5H from the screen and could not see any of the defocusing and other things that creep in during the work flow
    ( usually at final grading!) ...
    .... but perhaps the Time lapse was gathered at TV resolution not DSLR....

    But it was a very good programme with the story telling enhanced by the image framing and quality.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    quickly became known to me as You Bastard 
    Was it a mathematician?

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Knowledgeable and unobtrusive commentary, no personality camera hog  

    Oh yes, I forgot to mention the excellent commentary. Very well done.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    quickly became known to me as You Bastard 
    Was it a mathematician? 
    Possibly, you could count on it being either stubborn, obnoxious or once or twice downright dangerous. Have stuck to horses ever since. smiley - smiley

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dotbrass (U15627209) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    I would like to congratulate BBC2 for Wild Arabia. It is a most beautiful and sensitive production. Many times the glorious shots are allowed to speak for themselves, no need for any commentory. I remain enchanted, thank you

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Bouillaguet (U14312340) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    I concur with the last poster.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    By the programme - or just in general?  smiley - laugh

    Quite a lot, now you come to mention it Geometry.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    I loved watching the Bedouin watching themselves at the end, but I would have liked more animals.

    The water shots were stunning.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by ashleyhr (U14203741) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Message 13

    There's thread for that:
    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...
    BBC Wales are clearly blinkered Rugby Fanatics (a good result in Rome today though).

    I got a bit bored with the camel racing item tacked on at the end of Wild Arabia. But I think it was really more about how the programme makers built up a good rapport with the locals (and perhaps about how neither any militant religion or xenophobia got in the way).

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by shytalker (U15033137) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Knowledgeable and unobtrusive commentary, no personality camera hog  

    Oh yes, I forgot to mention the excellent commentary. Very well done. 
    As you say the commentary was quite unobtrusive(unlike the manic drummer) but one big gripe-the horned viper,or any other snake come to that,is not poisonous.It is venomous,so many people get this wrong but I would have expected it to be correct in a wildlife documentary

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Saturday, 23rd February 2013

    Knowledgeable and unobtrusive commentary, no personality camera hog  

    Oh yes, I forgot to mention the excellent commentary. Very well done. 
    As you say the commentary was quite unobtrusive(unlike the manic drummer) but one big gripe-the horned viper,or any other snake come to that,is not poisonous.It is venomous,so many people get this wrong but I would have expected it to be correct in a wildlife documentary 

    Please explain - what's the difference between venomous and poisonous?

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    If it bites you and you die*, it's venomous.
    If you bite it and you die*, it's poisonous.

    * In the most extreme cases.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    I didn't know the horned viper was a real animal, having only seen it before as a hieroglyph on Only Connect smiley - smiley

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    If it bites you and you die*, it's venomous.
    If you bite it and you die*, it's poisonous.

    * In the most extreme cases. 

    Ah, thanks.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    Presumably they released the desert fox and gerbil creature in the studio at different times?

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    I loved watching the Bedouin watching themselves at the end, but I would have liked more animals.

    The water shots were stunning. 
    Presumably there is a paucity of wild animals in an environment like that. Only the very specialised creatures like the Oryx and the camel survive. For me the fascination lay in being shown what could actually survive out there and how they did it.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    Presumably they released the desert fox and gerbil creature in the studio at different times? 
    That was a jerboa, not a gerbil.

    Yes, I agree they weren't filmed together.

    The sequence was prefixed with the statement, "using special filming techniques, we can re-create the drama of their lives".

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Sunday, 24th February 2013

    Yes - I'm going to have to find some excuse to use that marvellous phrase myself. They also use it at the start of such shows as 'The Only Way Is Essex' and 'Made In Chelsea' don't they?

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Tonight (regional variation) we can look forward to an Arabian leopard, chameleons and honey-badgers rare whales, green sea turtles and foxes, striped hyenas and Arabian wolves.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    I would like to congratulate BBC2 for Wild Arabia. It is a most beautiful and sensitive production. Many times the glorious shots are allowed to speak for themselves, no need for any commentory. I remain enchanted, thank you

     
    Yes a good programme, great pictures and a good commentary smiley - smiley

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Tonight (regional variation) we can look forward to an Arabian leopard, chameleons and honey-badgers rare whales, green sea turtles and foxes, striped hyenas and Arabian wolves.

     

    Looks like a good one tonight.

    I didn't even know there were such things as Arabian Leopards and Arabian Wolves.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Another spellbinding episode. Great locations and more wild creatures I'd not seen before. The crew clearly knew their subject.

    Interesting to see the cameramen using long lens DSLRs. The Bushnell tracker cams certainly aren't capable of producing the quality footage some scenes implied. And you can't leave them running for "a full year" in video mode with a standard battery pack!

    Honey badgers should get their own series.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Oh, and most effective use of timelapse I've seen for ages.

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Bouillaguet (U14312340) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Stunning photography, good commentary and minimal music = great series.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Stunning photography, good commentary and minimal music = great series.  Another excellent programme smiley - smiley

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Another great programme well worth watching.
    One thing that irritates me about wild life programmes now. How they know the precise numbers, or indeed any numbers, of endangered species remaining. Last night we had the Arabian Sperm whales - "only 100 left", then the "very rare, elusive and seldom seen" Arabian leopard - "only 100-200 left". As this animal is so rare, elusive and seldom seen I wonder how they counted them.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Last night we had the Arabian Sperm whales - "only 100 left" 
    It was worse than that. He said "less [sic] than 100 left".

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Oh dear, maybe only 98 left then!

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Another great programme well worth watching.
    One thing that irritates me about wild life programmes now. How they know the precise numbers, or indeed any numbers, of endangered species remaining. Last night we had the Arabian Sperm whales - "only 100 left", then the "very rare, elusive and seldom seen" Arabian leopard - "only 100-200 left". As this animal is so rare, elusive and seldom seen I wonder how they counted them. 
    Interesting question when they were surprised there were 12 wolves in the pack, and they aren't rare

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Oh, and most effective use of timelapse I've seen for ages.  So Green....smiley - cool


    Thought last nights, was even better then last weeks.

    But those Rats, with the teeth....smiley - yikes....
    and the Scorpion in the Camera Bag...smiley - monster

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    But those Rats, with the teeth....... 
    Best eaten with a jar of Hyrax Tonight from the local supermarket.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    Oh, and most effective use of timelapse I've seen for ages.  So Green....smiley - cool


    Thought last nights, was even better then last weeks.

    But those Rats, with the teeth....smiley - yikes....
    and the Scorpion in the Camera Bag...smiley - monster 

    I also thought it was better than last week's.

    Very interesting animals, and super photography.

    Once again though I was disappointed with some of the HD quality (only some of it). I watched via satellite but had a back-up recording of Freeview HD - checked that and it seemed to be a bit better - is this possible?

    The timelapse was great, but leaves of trees in the foreground seemed to be fluttering normally in the breeze as the landscape aged weeks within seconds, which makes me a little suspicious that the sequence wasn't achieved via timelapse photography alone.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by signonymous (U14407751) on Saturday, 2nd March 2013

    The timelapse was great, but leaves of trees in the foreground seemed to be fluttering normally in the breeze as the landscape aged weeks within seconds, which makes me a little suspicious that the sequence wasn't achieved via timelapse photography alone. 

    Hmm, interesting. There wasn't a single jitter which is also unusual for DSLR timelapse sequences over such a long period.

    In fact the sand dune timelapse sequence in 'Africa' also featured clouds scudding slowly by as the weeks flashed past beneath them. A multiple layered composition presumably?

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by cjp1979 (U9972316) on Tuesday, 5th March 2013

    Episode 1 - fine
    Episode 2 - great

    The Dhofar Mountains episode was an excellent programme. I loved the technique they devised of following the two conservationists as a way of introducing the footage of the big carnivores, which the BBC would have had a hard time getting themselves.

    Agree with some of the other comments above. I too was disappointed to hear another reference to "special filming techniques" which immediately took me out of the scene and wondering about how it was filmed. Totally unnecessary.

    I'm also getting fed up of timelapse sequences now, they are becoming a cliche. Especially when they are so obviously doctored in post-production like this week's.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by cjp1979 (U9972316) on Tuesday, 5th March 2013

    Following on from the intensely censored Wild China, once again a fine wildlife documentary is spoiled by the inclusion of 'Nanuk of the North' style phony human narratives.

    Very Orientalist and patronising. I look forward to Al Jazeera's "Wild London" featuring roaming bands of Pearly Kings and Queens and luvable Cockanees all dancing with theirbraces in their hands chanting their sacred cry of "Ave-a-Banana!"

    Just point the flippin camera at the flippin Amminuls!
     
    This made me laugh!

    I do agree with your comment on Wild China which was a propaganda vehicle for the Communist Party as much as a wildlife series. But I guess the BBC would have had their hands tied and argue that it was better to make the series than not go there.

    Report message50

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