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BBC NOT News 24

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 54
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by PCR (U15520741) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Is anyone else fed up of all the other programmes on the BBC News 24 channel, especially at the weekend??

    I am sure programmes such as Click, Ask The Author, Dateline London etc are all wonderfully made programmes, but when I put the news channel on, I want to watch the NEWS!!!!!

    All weekend it appears that the news is on only half the time, the rest of the time is taken up with all these different programmes. Why can't the BBC use a different channel to air them? Surely the Parliament channel is available at the weekend and I'm sure that everyone now has digital TV and can therefore access this channel.

    On the News 24 channel it should be just the news!!!!!

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) ** on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Click is technology news.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    I'm not. I like the other programs, They can be very informative. If they had News - as you define it - all the time, they would end up with a whole lot of repetition. When there is important news, they will tell us, and change the schedule - and occasionally when there is not so important news.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    Have a look at the schedule


    They're all news related..

    www.bbc.co.uk/bbcnew...

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by QE (U15612083) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    The schedule claims "Twenty-four hours a day, the latest national and international stories as they break" but, as PCR points out, that is not what we get.

    I like Click! but, when I switch over to News 24 it is for a quick update on the latest news. I don't expect 30 minutes of gadgets and 'cool' web sites.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Dateline London is a news programme.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    I believe that if there is a breaking story, it is indeed covered on the site, even if just as a ticker while they compile the story ready for the next session of presenter news.

    It might be best to contact BBC News directly if you have strong views and would like to share them with them.

    You can send us your views on BBC News, and the coverage of events by BBC News, in the following ways: By email newswatch@bbc.co.uk or via Twitter, telephone or by post

    All the contact information can be found here.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...


    Or you can make a complaint about BBC News coverage and presentation via the BBC complaints website.

    www.bbc.co.uk/compla...

    This way we can ensure that your feedback is read and received by the relevant department within the BBC


    The main BBC Newswatch page an be read here - Newswatch covers viewers' opinions on the coverage of events by BBC News, addressed by the editors and decision makers in charge

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...


    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    It's all news on the BBC News Channel, those Docs, are a more in depth look into the News.... .....I just wish it was in HD.smiley - cool

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Al (U1158256) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Is anyone else fed up of all the other programmes on the BBC News 24 channel, especially at the weekend??
     


    There's no such thing as "BBC News 24" channel. It's been "BBC News" channel since 2008.

    If there is any important, and often if there is an unimportant, news story the scheduled programme is dropped-sometimes even half way through the programme. So my concern has not been lack of news on the News channel but lack of the programme that I have tuned in to watch.

    Click now has a scheduled repeat on Monday mornings on BBC Two which hopefully will be less likely to be axed at the last minute.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by me_the_first (U1291324) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    (meanwhile, in a parallel universe...)


    "Whyohwhyohwhy does BBC News channel only broadcast endless, repeating news stories? Surely in any 24 hour period there must be enough time to show more in-depth news programmes or documentaries? For example, one about latest computer industry news (how about a name like Click?), or maybe London seen through the eyes of foreign correspondents..."

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Chelle (U3043549) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    they should have more special reports, you don't seem to get them on bbc news, but channel 4 news and a lot of the foreign news channels such as france24 and russia today do really indepth (usually hour-long) reports on fascinating news topics from around the world.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Is anyone else fed up of all the other programmes on the BBC News 24 channel, especially at the weekend

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Is anyone else fed up of all the other programmes on the BBC News 24 channel, especially at the weekend  Sorry posted by mistake but shouldn't it be fed up with.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by BonnysPlace (U14396592) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    (meanwhile, in a parallel universe...)


    "Whyohwhyohwhy does BBC News channel only broadcast endless, repeating news stories? Surely in any 24 hour period there must be enough time to show more in-depth news programmes or documentaries? For example, one about latest computer industry news (how about a name like Click?), or maybe London seen through the eyes of foreign correspondents..." 
    How about the fact that people get up at different times, and therefore need to see relevant news at different times?

    Sometimes I will rise at 6.a.m and watch (if I want to) repeats over and over on 'Breakfast'.

    I understand this is for the convenience of others, and change for a while until the last session. smiley - smiley

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    The worst offender is Steven Sackur on the 'let's be BBC tough' show Hard Talk. It should be called 'sit somebody in a chair and attack them from the right. That is not news, it is blatant opinion and consistently from one particular viewpoint. Stalinism gone mad, and I have to pay for it.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    It should be called 'sit somebody in a chair and attack them from the right 
    Do you mean the political right?

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) ** on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    I really wish this wasn't on everyday and often repeated, I would rather see the actual news.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Prophet Tenebrae (U5995226) ** on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    I'd say the greatest sin of BBC News is its slavish devotion to the 24 hour news cycle.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by norwblue (U1596117) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    (meanwhile, in a parallel universe...)


    "Whyohwhyohwhy does BBC News channel only broadcast endless, repeating news stories? Surely in any 24 hour period there must be enough time to show more in-depth news programmes or documentaries? For example, one about latest computer industry news (how about a name like Click?), or maybe London seen through the eyes of foreign correspondents..." 
    Surely there's an easy answer to cater for all opinions here. The headlines could be repeated every 15 mins, so everyone can quickly catch up on the main points whenever they happen to tune in but ensure that the intervening slots cover different subjects in depth, with no repeats within 2 hours. Bit like Radio 4 in the morning perhaps?

    As for Click and other more specialised news -why not use BBC 3 & 4 channels during the day time when these are normally off air?

    Breakfast is more of a chat show than a news programme, which could be shown on BBC 1 only, leaving the News channel for real news.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    The BBC 3& 4 bandwidths show children's programming during the day

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) ** on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    As for Click and other more specialised news -why not use BBC 3 & 4 channels during the day time when these are normally off air? 
    Yes CBBC and CBeebies use the "frequencies" during the day, don't be fooled by the static holding page.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by norwblue (U1596117) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    I believe that if there is a breaking story, it is indeed covered on the site, even if just as a ticker while they compile the story ready for the next session of presenter news.

    It might be best to contact BBC News directly if you have strong views and would like to share them with them.

    You can send us your views on BBC News, and the coverage of events by BBC News, in the following ways: By email newswatch@bbc.co.uk or via Twitter, telephone or by post

    All the contact information can be found here.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...


    Or you can make a complaint about BBC News coverage and presentation via the BBC complaints website.

    www.bbc.co.uk/compla...

    This way we can ensure that your feedback is read and received by the relevant department within the BBC


    The main BBC Newswatch page an be read here - Newswatch covers viewers' opinions on the coverage of events by BBC News, addressed by the editors and decision makers in charge

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...


     
    What seems to be missing from the Newswatch and other avenues on BBC news feedback is the opportunity to start threads and get feedback from other viewers. Yes, one can comment on the various news items displayed, but not on other issues. This is probably why there are so many attempts to raise news related threads on this board.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by norwblue (U1596117) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Well, that puts paid to that idea. Life was so much simpler in analogue days when a channel was simply a channel. Too much smoke and mirrors today.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    It should be called 'sit somebody in a chair and attack them from the right 
    Do you mean the political right? 
    Johnbee, you've not come back to say whether or not you meant the political right.

    If you do, perhaps you could explain how he managed to successfully challenge several right wing dictators by interviewing them, "from the right".

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    I'd say the greatest sin of BBC News is its slavish devotion to the 24 hour news cycle.  Surely these days people should be able to access news any time they like. If the BBC won't do it SKY will.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Tom Adustus (U9467814) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    Is anyone else fed up of all the other programmes on the BBC News 24 channel, especially at the weekend??

    I am sure programmes such as Click, Ask The Author, Dateline London etc are all wonderfully made programmes, but when I put the news channel on, I want to watch the NEWS!!!!!
    ...
     


    No. I like Dateline London and Click and try to catch them each weekend.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    No. I like Dateline London and Click and try to catch them each weekend. 
    Ditto both. But Meet the Author really has no place on a news channel - and it seems to be repeated endlessly, whereas if you miss Dateline London it's iPlayer or nothing.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by St Hopalong of the hairy chest (U14314874) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I caught Click for the first time the other day I found it really useful and thought "hey, this should be on at a better time"

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by BonnysPlace (U14396592) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I caught Click for the first time the other day I found it really useful and thought "hey, this should be on at a better time"   'Click' is an interesting slot. They do a shortened version on either Saturday or Sunday morning (can't remember which) and the presenter always says " The full version of 'Click' can be seen at......"
    smiley - smiley

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I always record the overnight transmission of Click (it's on at 0130 I think, though not sure which day without checking my PVR), as it's rarely, if ever, superseded by breaking news. Now it has a regular slot on BBC2, maybe it would be better to record that.

    I'd never rely on accidentally coming across a direct transmission!

    Much of it is very interesting, though the review of web sites is mostly boring to those who don't spend their entire waking hours on social media. smiley - smiley

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by PCR (U15520741) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    I agree with the idea to use BBC 3 or BBC 4 or the Parliament Channel to broadcast these programmes. I am not advocating getting rid of Click, Ask The Author, Dateline London etc., I am sure they are all excellently-made programmes, just move them to a channel that is free at the weekend and leave the News24 channel free to broadcast the news.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    I agree with the idea to use BBC 3 or BBC 4 or the Parliament Channel to broadcast these programmes. 
    But as had been said, the BBC3 and 4 bandwidth is used for CBBC and CBeebies in the daytime.
    And the programmes are nothing to do with Parliament so why would it be appropriate to broadcast them on the Parliament channel?

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by brora (U14803827) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    The trouble is BBC News channel just goes round and round repeating the same news and almost at times seems to be trying to make news just to fill the time up. At least Click is informative - I like it.

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Friday, 22nd February 2013

    But as had been said, the BBC3 and 4 bandwidth is used for CBBC and CBeebies in the daytime. 
    I am sure PCR is aware of that fact: there can't be many people who still aren't.

    However, I agree that these non-news programmes, like Meet the Author and the Film programme, would be better placed in slots on other channels (such as BBC4 and BBC3 respectively in the evening).

    And much as I enjoy most of Click, now that it has a permanent home on BBC2, perhaps it's time to remove it from the News channel altogether.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by me_the_first (U1291324) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    Probably not a subject that will ever get agreement, because we all have different habits. For me, having news headlines every half hour and no single hour completely "disrupted" in case I should wish for some background seems fair enough, on a weekend. The worst I have to wait is 30 mins. No single prog lasts more than a half hour slot and we know they will never replace the weather & news headlines on the half hour.

    From a purely statistical perspective, I checked next Saturday's lineup from 7am till midnight. News (inc Breakfast) covers 13 out of 17 hours. Click covers 2, and Dateline/Our World/Sports cover the other 2.

    These additional programmes cover background to news stories, and more in some cases. Rather like flicking though a magazine with the weekend papers. I think 13/17 (more than 75%) is plenty of rolling news (I accept Breakfast is a bit of a hybrid but is more focused on regular news).

    Click is shown 4 times on a Saturday. If it is the same programme repeated, then I could certainly concede that that's a bit excessive, but that's all, really.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by PrinceEugene (U13933926) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    I object to there being a BBC 24 Hour News Channel at all. Who actually needs to know the news as soon as it happens? Can't people wait till the evening and watch it at 6 or 10 or Newsnight? People who really want 24 News have got Sky. Of course, I am forgetting the BBC's golden rule: "If a service is provided by the private sector, the BBC must go into competition against that service using public money." (See also the BBC Asian Network.) Actually, I think the BBC has two 24 Hour News Services - there is BBC World as well. Why not show that and scrap the domestic version? It might broaden the horizons of the population.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    I caught Click for the first time the other day I found it really useful and thought "hey, this should be on at a better time"   'Click' is an interesting slot. They do a shortened version on either Saturday or Sunday morning (can't remember which) and the presenter always says " The full version of 'Click' can be seen at......"
    smiley - smiley 
    Spencer Kelly (for it is he) says that on Sunday mornings. The full show is on Saturdays and on line.

    What I don't get is why Spencer Kelly is sent to the most exotic locations, while Kate Russell never goes out at all, but always sits so seductively in that armchair. Hang on, maybe I can guess...

    I also like Newswatch, but I was sorry fidgety Raymond Snoddy was dropped. He is a fine journalist, and all round good egg. After all, he supports QPR.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    >>It might broaden the horizons of the population.


    It's not what viewers want. Which is why 'Breakfast' has an audience. And who would dare venture beyond our seas' horizons unless we have a familiar, celebrated face there to hold our hand and appear, comfortingly, in 75% of the shots ?

    smiley - smiley

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    It should be called 'sit somebody in a chair and attack them from the right 
    Do you mean the political right? 
    Johnbee, you've not come back to say whether or not you meant the political right.

    If you do, perhaps you could explain how he managed to successfully challenge several right wing dictators by interviewing them, "from the right". 
    Sorry you are going to have to explain which right wing dictators Sackur 'attacked'. I do not watch very many of that programmes efforts.
    I was supporting the OP, in that I definitely consider 'Hard Talk' as not a newws programme at all, but an opinion piece. I should add that because a person does not support a far right wing dictator, does not mean that he is politically in the centre

    It is perfectly OK for the Conservative supporting Daily Mail to put in articles voicing opinions consistently from one viewpoint. I suppose I had better say that also it is perfectly fine for the Lib Dem supporting Giuardian to regularly publish pieces by Jonathan Freedland from his viewpoint. But the BBC 24 hour news programme is supposed to be news, not propaganda. Opinion pieces are propaganda. The BBC try to get round this by claiming that they are giving a broad view and are news background programmes. Hard Talk should be on BBC1 or BBC2 along with Question Time and This week. It is not news.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    Sorry you are going to have to explain which right wing dictators Sackur 'attacked'. 
    I didn't say he attacked anyone, that was your term.

    He has, however shredded several corrupt African dictators, who I would certainly describe as right wing.

    Unlike you, I have watched many episodes of Hard Talk and I have never heard Stephen Sackur give what I consider to be a political opinion or deliver any "propaganda".

    Your posts clearly indicate that your perception comes from your own political prejudice.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by norwblue (U1596117) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I object to there being a BBC 24 Hour News Channel at all. Who actually needs to know the news as soon as it happens? Can't people wait till the evening and watch it at 6 or 10 or Newsnight? People who really want 24 News have got Sky. Of course, I am forgetting the BBC's golden rule: "If a service is provided by the private sector, the BBC must go into competition against that service using public money." (See also the BBC Asian Network.) Actually, I think the BBC has two 24 Hour News Services - there is BBC World as well. Why not show that and scrap the domestic version? It might broaden the horizons of the population.  Good idea. BBC World Service on digital or short wave radio is a welcome change from the repetitive home news programmes. Expect the TV equivalent would be similar.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    < He has, however shredded several corrupt African dictators, who I would certainly describe as right wing. >

    So Sackur attacks some black men in interviews with them and you think that shows he is middle of the road?

    You think that Sackur does not present Conservative values and opinions consistently, and yet you say it is me who is prejudiced?

    I have news for you. We are all prejudiced to support our own viewpoint. I am perfectly happy to have opinion pieces that accord with my own views, buit I also am certain that the BBC should not consistently broadcast from that viewpoint. People giving opinion pieces on BBC News should be Labour supporters, in about equal numbers with Conservatives, and rather fewer Liberal Democrats, with the occasional Green and anti-European. And that includes presenters and chairmen and chairwomen.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    So Sackur attacks some black men in interviews with them and you think that shows he is middle of the road? 
    Once again, the word 'attack' is yours, not mine.
    Not sure why you interpret African far right dictators as "some black men".
    Strange.
    You think that Sackur does not present Conservative values and opinions consistently 
    I don't think he presents any political agenda when he interviews.
    I have news for you. 
    Take it from me, you don't.
    People giving opinion pieces on BBC News should be Labour supporters, in about equal numbers with Conservatives, and rather fewer Liberal Democrats 
    I don't accept that he is presenting an opinion. He is doing his job as a journalist and challenging the views and actions of controversial people.

    Although such BBC journalists will obviously have personal political views, they should *never* allow these views to affect their interviews, and I don't accept that Stephen Sackur has ever done so.

    I'm done discussing this with you.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by PCR (U15520741) on Monday, 4th March 2013

    Yet another weekend of Click, Ask The Author, Reporters. All these programmes could be shown on the Parliament Channel. Please BBC, take notice!!! I was forced to resort to watching Sky News at one point.

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Monday, 4th March 2013

    No, BBC Parliament is specifically to deal with matters specifically related to parliament and politics Its remit is to make accessible to all the work of the parliamentary and legislative bodies of the United Kingdom and the European Parliament.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by me_the_first (U1291324) on Monday, 4th March 2013

    Yet another weekend of Click, Ask The Author, Reporters. All these programmes could be shown on the Parliament Channel. Please BBC, take notice!!! I was forced to resort to watching Sky News at one point.  If it was not already clear, PCR, I take the opposite view. As mentioned above, this output represents around 25% of the day, but the way you explain yourself, that's unacceptable. I still haven't understood why.

    Why is max 25 minutes too long to wait for an update? That's really the worst case scenario whether you are watching continually or dipped in and were "unlucky" enough to catch the start of one of the slots.

    Even if you couldn't wait, you can still get the latest on the red button, or online.

    I just can't begin to understand where 30 minutes without the rolling news coverage is that important. Unless there is a breaking news story that requires continual updates, in which case, those programmes can be, and are dropped.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Andy (U14048329) on Monday, 4th March 2013

    Yet another weekend of Click, Ask The Author, Reporters. All these programmes could be shown on the Parliament Channel. Please BBC, take notice!!! I was forced to resort to watching Sky News at one point.  The Parliament Channel? Why?

    And you say "yet another weekend" like these programmes fall out of the sky totally unscheduled.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by treetop91 (U8281451) on Monday, 4th March 2013

    When we have 24/7 access to news via the internet,phones and so many other opportunities this channel is a perfect example of the BBC wasting precious resources. It is totally unnecessary , duplicates so much available elsewhere and should be scrapped forthwith. Too many BBC anchormen seem to think it is their purpose to try and push viewers onto this channel suggesting even the BBC management realise it is surplus to requirements but are desperately trying to achieve an audience to avoid having to take a real decision to scrap it.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Bouillaguet (U14312340) on Monday, 4th March 2013

    Why are so many people in the U.K. obsessed by watching the news? Are you all expecting an invasion or something?

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) ** on Monday, 4th March 2013

    What smiley - yikes do you know something, smiley - run buy stuff.

    Report message50

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