BBC Television programmes  permalink

Red Nose Day

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 1 - 41 of 41
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Paulstiles (U15621110) on Monday, 18th February 2013

    Why is Red Nose Day advertised on the radio and tv with an American accent?

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    Because it's emulating the voice used on film promos from way back when... Perhaps you're too young to remember them...

    www.rednoseday.com/...

    Have a listen, do others remember this voice being used?

    Was it Rank film entertainment, or one of the others? Does anyone remember?

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Testcard (U1164920) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Don LaFontaine voiced many US action movie trailers in a style that has been parodied many times.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Excellent opportunity for you to explore other TV channels! Or can you only receive BBC1?

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Excellent opportunity for you to explore other TV channels! Or can you only receive BBC1? 

    I am rather surprised you are on these boards; given that you also must "receive" more than BBC1 this surely also procludes you from having an opinion.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Viligante (U14039144) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Why is Red Nose Day advertised on the radio and tv with an American accent? 
    Adding such a dramatic voice to the trailer is because it's just for a bit of fun, which hopefully will raise money. I like Red Nose Day smiley - smiley

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by santapup (U14659366) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Don't forget Boo Boo2's rules on this board-if you say anything pro BBC-you must work for them

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Viligante (U14039144) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    Oops, sorry thedogcody, I forgot about the 'rules' smiley - winkeye

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Being somebody that finds the whole concept of “telethons” tedious does not reflect my attitude to charity but simply the idea that idiotic low quality TV filled with self-promoting individuals appears nowadays to be the only way to motivate people to give. We have a conveyor belt of attention seekers regaled as selfless heroes when in reality the heroes, those to be put on pedestals, are those who do charitable work “at the coal face” day-in and day-out. And everyone is expected to join-in, laugh uncontrollably at utter rubbish and make contribution at the risk of being seen as a uncharitable.

    I do not need a drunk IT girl screeching or news-readers in ladies underwear to make me help those worse off than me. One off donations at the bequest of reality “stars” does not absolve my conscious. Surely my monthly standing orders mean more than donating a fiver because a has-been has found an opportunity to re-ignite their career in the name of “charity”.

    And its not just about money, its about actions, about a wish for permanent help. Of course any help is good help and that includes the occasional “telethon” but the more these are dragged out the more diluted the essence of its aim. That is why Live Aid is seen as a changing point in many people’s lives, the memories of the terrible images and haunting videos still upsetting and effective today.


    Don't forget Boo Boo2's rules on this board-if you say anything pro BBC-you must work for them  

    It really hurt you didn’t it…..

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by santapup (U14659366) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    .


    Don't forget Boo Boo2's rules on this board-if you say anything pro BBC-you must work for them  

    It really hurt you didn’t it…..
     


    No-just completely unwarranted and completely unnecessary.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Excellent opportunity for you to explore other TV channels! Or can you only receive BBC1? 

    I am rather surprised you are on these boards; given that you also must "receive" more than BBC1 this surely also procludes you from having an opinion. 
    Merely trying (and failing unfortunately) to head off the almost inevitable whinge that seems to follow the return of the one evening a year charity telethon produced by the BBC.
    It's not my cup of tea either, but I refuse to look upon it's presence as a personal affront - I just don't watch it.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    Yes, that's the person I was thinking of - thanks Testcard!

    He had an amazing voice! smiley - smiley

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    LaFontaine lent his very distinctive voice to thousands of movie trailers during his career, spanning every genre from every major film studio, including The Cannon Group, for which he voiced one of their logos. For a time, LaFontaine had a near-monopoly on movie trailer voiceovers.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Sorry. Although you're the first anti charideethon whinger this time round, you don't win a prize

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Sorry. Although you're the first anti charideethon whinger this time round, you don't win a prize 
    Hunting in packs nowadays? I'm running scared .... smiley - evilgrin

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    No-just completely unwarranted and completely unnecessary. 

    Your comment? My comment? Or both?

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Excellent opportunity for you to explore other TV channels! Or can you only receive BBC1? 

    I am rather surprised you are on these boards; given that you also must "receive" more than BBC1 this surely also procludes you from having an opinion. 
    Merely trying (and failing unfortunately) to head off the almost inevitable whinge that seems to follow the return of the one evening a year charity telethon produced by the BBC.
    It's not my cup of tea either, but I refuse to look upon it's presence as a personal affront - I just don't watch it. 
    Actually, Comic Relief is one evening every two years.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by santapup (U14659366) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    No-just completely unwarranted and completely unnecessary. 

    Your comment? My comment? Or both?
     
    Your comments about people working for the BBC-but you know that-so please stop the games- eh?- and all play nicely.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    Because it's emulating the voice used on film promos from way back when... Perhaps you're too young to remember them...

    www.rednoseday.com/...

    Have a listen, do others remember this voice being used?

    Was it Rank film entertainment, or one of the others? Does anyone remember?

     

    One of the others Peta....probably although I do vaguely recall....what was that you asked?

    I am being sponsored from my sofa.....to see how long I can stand it sitting down and putting my feet up.....Got my Red Nose! smiley - devil Looks like this without the ears and tail....

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    I do not need a drunk IT girl screeching or news-readers in ladies underwear to make me help those worse off than me. One off donations at the bequest of reality “stars” does not absolve my conscious. Surely my monthly standing orders mean more than donating a fiver because a has-been has found an opportunity to re-ignite their career in the name of “charity”.  

    You know BooBoo you have a point because I feel as you do, as I'm sure others do also - but you know this seems to be the 'thing' these days...a whole lot of shouting within a plethora of tastless hysteria....and SO noisy!

    But, Hey! Let it go. Attention has to be brought, and this seems to work. If there is another way to present, I would be interested to know what. smiley - smiley Any ideas anyone?

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Sorry. Although you're the first anti charideethon whinger this time round, you don't win a prize 
    Hunting in packs nowadays? I'm running scared .... smiley - evilgrin 
    NIce try, but I responded before I read all the others.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    It really hurt you didn’t it…..  Why do you want to hurt someone. Do we have a cyber bully in our midst.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by victoria (U3941046) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Why is Red Nose Day advertised on the radio and tv with an American accent? 
    Adding such a dramatic voice to the trailer is because it's just for a bit of fun, which hopefully will raise money. I like Red Nose Day smiley - smiley 
    why are so many things on tv spoken with an American accent ...? sometimes I feel as though we are another state of the USA ....

    i dont know which is worse the geordie accent or the American ...

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Why is Red Nose Day advertised on the radio and tv with an American accent? 
    Adding such a dramatic voice to the trailer is because it's just for a bit of fun, which hopefully will raise money. I like Red Nose Day smiley - smiley 
    why are so many things on tv spoken with an American accent ...? sometimes I feel as though we are another state of the USA ....

    i dont know which is worse the geordie accent or the American ...

     
    Sometimes when I'm in the kitchen I hear from the T.V next door away voices that sound like John Barrowman who seemed to speak with a mid-atlantic accent.

    And they seem to be increasing!...... smiley - yikes !!!

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Merely trying (and failing unfortunately) to head off the almost inevitable whinge that seems to follow the return of the one evening a year charity telethon produced by the BBC.  Actually, Comic Relief is one evening every two years.  Children In Need is every year, so that's two evenings of charity telethon this year. Two too many.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by stirling (U13732738) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    It really hurt you didn’t it….. 

    Why do you want to hurt someone. Do we have a cyber bully in our midst. 


    Looks like one of these threads that will degenerate into a slanging match that will eventually get closed by Peta.

    Meanwhile the "first time" OP disappears forever smiley - laugh

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Oh no Red Nose Day .... more tedium with charity as the excuse.  Excellent opportunity for you to explore other TV channels! Or can you only receive BBC1? 

    I am rather surprised you are on these boards; given that you also must "receive" more than BBC1 this surely also procludes you from having an opinion. 
    Merely trying (and failing unfortunately) to head off the almost inevitable whinge that seems to follow the return of the one evening a year charity telethon produced by the BBC.
    It's not my cup of tea either, but I refuse to look upon it's presence as a personal affront - I just don't watch it. 
    Actually, Comic Relief is one evening every two years. 
    Never mentioned Comic Relief. Specifically went with "telethon".

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Actually, Comic Relief is one evening every two years.  Hasn't it already started?
    I think I spotted some red noses on the telly earlier today. They were on a couple of children about to do a dance to celebrate their 'new way of working' - or something like that, I didn't hang around to find out exactly what was going on.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by tony ingram (U14880461) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    Merely trying (and failing unfortunately) to head off the almost inevitable whinge that seems to follow the return of the one evening a year charity telethon produced by the BBC.  Actually, Comic Relief is one evening every two years.  Children In Need is every year, so that's two evenings of charity telethon this year. Two too many.  I would agree with that. A total waste of an evening's viewing. There is nothing guaranteed to make me feel less like giving anything to charity than being repeatedly exhorted to by some patronising, self righteous pillock of a 'celebrity'.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    Merely trying (and failing unfortunately) to head off the almost inevitable whinge that seems to follow the return of the one evening a year charity telethon produced by the BBC.  Actually, Comic Relief is one evening every two years.  Children In Need is every year, so that's two evenings of charity telethon this year. Two too many.  I would agree with that. A total waste of an evening's viewing. There is nothing guaranteed to make me feel less like giving anything to charity than being repeatedly exhorted to by some patronising, self righteous pillock of a 'celebrity'.   See message 5

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by tony ingram (U14880461) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    Yes, but if you switch to one of the commercial channels you've then got some berk trying to emotionally blackmail you into giving three quid a month to distressed, homeless, abused baby puppies in Africa, or something roughly every 15 minutes...

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I have to add my voice to those who don't understand why the whingers are so bothered. What Friday night delights are you missing?

    I must stress that I don't consider Comic Relief or Children In Need anything but quality entertainment. In fact, in the history of Comic Relief, there has only been one sketch which I've found funny. However, as ways of raising funds for charity, both are very successful, and I am not about to be so churlish or selfish as to moan about the lack of entertainment, not least when there are are so many other things to do, and this is a point I always make when the anti-sporters crawl out of the woodwork.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by norwblue (U1596117) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    Being somebody that finds the whole concept of “telethons” tedious does not reflect my attitude to charity but simply the idea that idiotic low quality TV filled with self-promoting individuals appears nowadays to be the only way to motivate people to give. We have a conveyor belt of attention seekers regaled as selfless heroes when in reality the heroes, those to be put on pedestals, are those who do charitable work “at the coal face” day-in and day-out. And everyone is expected to join-in, laugh uncontrollably at utter rubbish and make contribution at the risk of being seen as a uncharitable.

    I do not need a drunk IT girl screeching or news-readers in ladies underwear to make me help those worse off than me. One off donations at the bequest of reality “stars” does not absolve my conscious. Surely my monthly standing orders mean more than donating a fiver because a has-been has found an opportunity to re-ignite their career in the name of “charity”.

    And its not just about money, its about actions, about a wish for permanent help. Of course any help is good help and that includes the occasional “telethon” but the more these are dragged out the more diluted the essence of its aim. That is why Live Aid is seen as a changing point in many people’s lives, the memories of the terrible images and haunting videos still upsetting and effective today.


    Don't forget Boo Boo2's rules on this board-if you say anything pro BBC-you must work for them  

    It really hurt you didn’t it…..
     
    Couldn't agree more. Same with the honours system - means so much more when a dedicated charity worker gets an MBE rather than some vaccuous celebrity.

    I must admit to coming close to tears and reaching for the cheque book during the first Children in Need. Now I don't watch it, being content with the monthly standing orders which give the charities concerned some stability of income.

    I can't help but admire the fund raising of the many around the country who put in so much effort, but if the programme production costs were also assigned to charity instead, would not this be a better society for all those in genuine need?

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I'm pretty sure that the sum raised will be far higher than the production costs!

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    Do they still have managing directors of various companies coming on with huge cheques for rather small amounts?

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by norwblue (U1596117) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I'm pretty sure that the sum raised will be far higher than the production costs!  Bit if both were to go to charity? Would not people still raise money without hours of television output ?

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    "Simply the idea that idiotic low quality television filled with, numerous egotistical, self-promoting celebrities appears to be the only way nowadays to actually motivate people to donate money to charity." 
    So, regrettably, this apparently inescapable annual begathon is about to rammed down our throats yet again. Well if it's not Comic Relief, then it's Children In Need or Sports Relief.

    Unsurprisingly, I often receive rather astonished or sometimes an even hostile reactions, from both friends and work colleagues, when I bluntly tell that I just simply absolutely loath, and detest, these three huge televised charity events.

    In these severe austere times of acute, economic hardship - where 7.8 % of the population is currently unemployed and hundreds of other people are facing an uncertain future about their longterm job security - why does the BBC think it is both right, or even appropriate, for multi-millionaire comedians / celebrities to shout and tell me to get off my backside and give my hard-earned cash to one of these specific three charities mentioned above?

    Furthermore, if all the incredibly wealthy celebrities actually participating in guilt-tripping the nation into giving money to Comic Relief actually dipped their hands in their own pocket instead, then a whole lot more cash would undoubtedly be generated for charity concerned itself.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    You could always sponsor me for my 'Comic Relief All-I-Can-Eat Slap-up Meal' at the Savoy Grill.

    Can I put you down for a tenner a course?
    smiley - smiley

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by tony ingram (U14880461) on Thursday, 21st February 2013


    In these severe austere times of acute, economic hardship - where 7.8 % of the population is currently unemployed and hundreds of other people are facing an uncertain future about their longterm job security - why does the BBC think it is both right, or even appropriate, for multi-millionaire comedians / celebrities to shout and tell me to get off my backside and give my hard-earned cash to one of these specific three charities mentioned above? 
    Couldn't agree more. This is how I feel, too. Pretty much everyone I know is struggling financially, the last thing anyone in that situation needs is to be browbeaten by people insisting they can afford to give to charity every time they turn on the TV, whether it's these telethons or the endless appeals in the ad breaks on the other channels. These days, I just switch off the minute they come on.

    Furthermore, if all the incredibly wealthy celebrities actually participating in guilt-tripping the nation into giving money to Comic Relief actually dipped their hands in their own pocket instead, then a whole lot more cash would undoubtedly be generated for charity concerned itself.
     
    Because they didn't become wealthy by giving money away.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by santapup (U14659366) on Thursday, 21st February 2013

    "Simply the idea that idiotic low quality television filled with, numerous egotistical, self-promoting celebrities appears to be the only way nowadays to actually motivate people to donate money to charity." 
    So, regrettably, this apparently inescapable annual begathon is about to rammed down our throats yet again. Well if it's not Comic Relief, then it's Children In Need or Sports Relief.

    Unsurprisingly, I often receive rather astonished or sometimes an even hostile reactions, from both friends and work colleagues, when I bluntly tell that I just simply absolutely loath, and detest, these three huge televised charity events.

    In these severe austere times of acute, economic hardship - where 7.8 % of the population is currently unemployed and hundreds of other people are facing an uncertain future about their longterm job security - why does the BBC think it is both right, or even appropriate, for multi-millionaire comedians / celebrities to shout and tell me to get off my backside and give my hard-earned cash to one of these specific three charities mentioned above?

    Furthermore, if all the incredibly wealthy celebrities actually participating in guilt-tripping the nation into giving money to Comic Relief actually dipped their hands in their own pocket instead, then a whole lot more cash would undoubtedly be generated for charity concerned itself.
     
    You make some good and valid points-yes as a nation we are "hard up" -but no-one is forced to give or made to feel guilty if they dont-do they?

    However in the same way as we don't know what you give- if any-you don't know what a celebrity may give in private either so a bit of a sweeping assumption there if I may say so

    And in addition if a celeb wants do a running marathon,swimming marathon ,cycling marathon or whatever and people pledge money on the back of that -why is that a bad thing

    Ok it is not for you-let it pass you by-but some people just need a little nudge to take part.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Thursday, 21st February 2013

    You make some good and valid points-yes as a nation we are "hard up" -but no-one is forced to give or made to feel guilty if they dont-do they?  
    I am afraid that people ARE made to feel guilty. It is as if by giving so publicly you are more benevolent that one who gives regularly without the fanfare. And we get people who crave attention, who like to be seen as zany and extroverted, inflicting themselves on others who are either obliged to awkwardly join-in or dig deep in their pockets to get away.

    However in the same way as we don't know what you give- if any-you don't know what a celebrity may give in private either so a bit of a sweeping assumption there if I may say so  

    I quite agree that many celebrities do give money in private or offer sponsorship to charities and that is of course fantastic. On the other hand there are many who see such high profile events as a means to promote themselves. There is unfortunately a nasty egotistical side to many so called “celebrities” , with cynical opportunism the order of the day. I can imagine the frenzied calls from agents trying to get their clients on the box under whatever guise.

    I remember a while back when there was some reality rubbish on which Jodie Marsh took somebody aside and whispered that she did a lot for charity work, gave away nearly £100k every year and hardly anyone knew this as it was secret. It was obvious that she was well aware that her microphone was on and camera rolling, and if we are naïve enough to believe she didn’t, she could have edited this out of the broadcasted programme. It was so obviously a cynical attempt to put her in a better light. All it serves to do was to shock me to think that somebody of such hidden talent earns enough to spare £100k (assuming it was true).

    And in addition if a celeb wants do a running marathon,swimming marathon ,cycling marathon or whatever and people pledge money on the back of that -why is that a bad thing  

    Two reasons why this might be a bad thing…. (1) charities rely on constant income to do their work. One-off donations such as those generated by telethons will, in the long term, reduce overall donations because people will feel they have played their part, absolving them of guilt, and (2) the message behind each charity is overshadowed by the gawping of so called “celebrities” doing stupid things. Let’s be honest what do people talk about the day after a telethon? Is it the idiotic prancing of someone famous or the work done by the charities?

    Furthermore there is also negativity by association – charities will select famous people to represent them to raise their profile, this a carefully done so that true role models are employed and therefore the likelihood of greater donations being received. What the telethons offer are many poor role models (subliminally) aligning themselves to specific charities. There is very little shame now in the world of celebrity, infamy indeed can be seen as a positive to a career. However there are many people who do still adhere to standards, I for one would not look to support a charity promoted to whatever level by (as per my previous message) an “It” girl who is often seen in the media in the ravages of drink and drugs. And it remains that screeching into a microphone is neither entertaining, heroic or warranting standing ovations (are the audiences the same as those on X-Factor?)

    In these severe austere times of acute, economic hardship - where 7.8 % of the population is currently unemployed and hundreds of other people are facing an uncertain future about their longterm job security - why does the BBC think it is both right, or even appropriate, for multi-millionaire comedians / celebrities to shout and tell me to get off my backside and give my hard-earned cash to one of these specific three charities mentioned above?  

    I agree with your sentiment but I guess we should remember that ultimately no-one is forced to give. If you can overcome the guilt trip inflicted by others then it’s your choice. Unfortunately in times of austerity many charities are under their greater pressure with more people needing their help. Because of this there are more sponsorship forms thrust under our noses, more juggers out on the street, it is inevitable that resentment will grow and charities damaged over the long-term. Sponsored marathon runs, parachute jumps, Prince’s Trust excursions, night-runs, cycle rides have all popped-up on my desk in the last 6 months – it all mounts up.

    Report message41

Back to top

About this Board

The Points of View team invite you to discuss BBC Television programmes.

Add basic Smileys or extra Smileys to your posts.

Questions? Check the BBC FAQ for answers first!

Go to: BBC News Have your say to discuss topics in the news

Make a complaint? Go to the BBC complaints website.

BBC News: Off-topic for this board, so contact them directly with your feedback: Contact BBC News

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.


Mon-Sat: 0900-2300
Sun: 1000-2300

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

Recent Discussions

Copyright © 2014 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.