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The Railway -Keeping Britain on Track

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    This was on BBC 2 last night similar to the Tube programme shown last year a warts and all programme about Kings Cross station this time

    The cleaner who despite never virtually travelled on a train and hated her job to the station manager who retired after so many years-who seemed to love his- this was just another of those nice,undemanding insights to what goes on behind the scenes

    Five to go-worth a watch IMHO. smiley - smiley

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by PetPig (U9766236) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    It was a really heart-warming programme. What lovely 'salt of the earth' people the rail workers were, full of resilience and humour in spite of technical glitches and some ill-tempered travellers.

    A great pity these front-line people have to bear the brunt of commuters' frustrations, while those responsible cower in their comfortable offices.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Calendula (U2331338) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    They don't always 'cower in their offices'.

    My local train company has 'meet the managers' sessions at the London termini it uses where commuters can address issues straight to more senior staff. A couple of things I have raised at these sessions have been put right pretty quickly, or reasonable explanantions given.

    I think it's a great idea, and something all the TOCs should do more of.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    A great pity these front-line people have to bear the brunt of commuters' frustrations, while those responsible cower in their comfortable offices.  

    Maybe, but the frustrated commuters should know better than to be beastly to the front-line staff. These programmes show how bad-mannered and brutish the public can be.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by heterodox (U14291406) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    'What lovely 'salt of the earth' people the rail workers were, full of resilience and humour...'


    There was a time when railwaymen (those working on the footplate, guards, signalmen and others) were the elite of the working-class and, as such, did not need condescensions like this. What I saw last night, by contrast, was a group of workers who were only prepared to work for the low pay on offer because they doubted their fitness for anything better. Chronic overweight and a preparedness to be totally demoralised were the main attributes they brought to the job.
    Supervisory grades, those that we saw, were steeped in the nonsense that is modern-day 'management-speak ' and we need look no further than to them to find reasons why the railway service is so poor and so ridiculously expensive.

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  • Message 6

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    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by billy_bumble (U14467942) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    'What lovely 'salt of the earth' people the rail workers were, full of resilience and humour...'


    There was a time when railwaymen (those working on the footplate, guards, signalmen and others) were the elite of the working-class and, as such, did not need condescensions like this. What I saw last night, by contrast, was a group of workers who were only prepared to work for the low pay on offer because they doubted their fitness for anything better. Chronic overweight and a preparedness to be totally demoralised were the main attributes they brought to the job.
    Supervisory grades, those that we saw, were steeped in the nonsense that is modern-day 'management-speak ' and we need look no further than to them to find reasons why the railway service is so poor and so ridiculously expensive. 


    Absolutely 100% spot on

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by SJD (U5974316) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Did I hear right? Was one Customer Service person informed by phone that a train was delayed because it hit a pheasant?

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by noviomagus (U9545153) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Did I hear right? Was one Customer Service person informed by phone that a train was delayed because it hit a pheasant?  Indeed she was and mercifully did not try and sing 'The Pheasant Pluckers Song'

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by pc1973 (U13716600) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Quite enjoyed it.

    I did laugh and have sympathy at the same time for the guy who was left speechless when he was told the price of his ticket.

    I found that manager annoying with his powerpoint/business speak rubbish.

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by noviomagus (U9545153) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    I found that manager annoying with his powerpoint/business speak rubbish.

    Indeed, I reckon most of us do ! smiley - smiley

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Grandadpop (U3054464) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    "Your attention please...
    "The train now standing at Platform 9 is the 11.45 to Holborn, Elephant & Castle, Brixton and Clapham.. We apologise for the 75 minute delay and passengers are advised the driver has almost finished his break. One more cup of coffee and he will be back on duty. Thank you..."

    One would think with fines totalling some £10,000 for such delays, another driver would be on standby to take over?

    However bright and shiny the new station looks, it won't improve efficiency if they haven't got the staff!

    'G-G' smiley - erm

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013


    One would think with fines totalling some £10,000 for such delays, another driver would be on standby to take over?  


    Ticket prices would go up even more, if they paid extra drivers to sit around reading the paper just in case of emergencies.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by colonelblimp (U1705702) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013


    One would think with fines totalling some £10,000 for such delays, another driver would be on standby to take over?  


    Ticket prices would go up even more, if they paid extra drivers to sit around reading the paper just in case of emergencies.  
    It depends how they choose to invest their money, doesn't it? I couldn't care less what King's Cross looks like: it's just a train shed where, if the TOCs are running their services as advertised, customers will be spending the minimum amount of time. As we saw, the reality behind the shiny facade was still tired old rolling stock, delays, cancellations and overcrowding. I'ld rather see TOCs spending their money to address these issues and to deliver, to an acceptable standard, the service that I'm paying an inflated price for than see them spending it on repackaging the same shoddy product. And that includes resourcing their operations adequately. I've been delayed a number of times recently, and not so recently, because a service was "awaiting train crew". The TOC wouldn't accept it if I paid them £5 less than the applicable fare. Why should I accept it when they repeatedly deliver me to my destination 25 or 30 minutes late, on a 60 minute journey, because they won't employ enough people to deliver the service they advertise?

    I loved the bloke standing on the platform telling customers that they were entitled to a full refund. In 40 years of rail travel, it's never happened to me once, so I suspect he was there for the benefit of the cameras. My experience as a commuter was that TOCs (particularly WAGN and GNER, in my case) reacted to failure to deliver on their part by rounding on their customers and conjuring up claims of mass fare-dodging that weren't substantiated by the available facts. I recall in the aftermath of Potters Bar being confronted on Huntingdon station by two WAGN employees who neither knew nor cared when (or if) the next train would arrive but were only interested in demanding to see people's tickets, as proof that they'd paid for the service WAGN was conspicuously failing to deliver.

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Did I hear right? Was one Customer Service person informed by phone that a train was delayed because it hit a pheasant?  They also said one Train ran out of Fuel.....smiley - yikes

    Thought this was very good, stars for me: Laxman, who was retiring and Alexis, from customers services.

    But they weren't all a Happy Bunch....that one in the rest room talking, was miserable but funny with it.

    And that singing one, got on my nerves.

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Guv-nor __ Demanding chocolate with menaces (U7476305) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Certainly a good programme.

    As to the singing as a complaint at least it was not BGM.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Guv-nor __ Demanding chocolate with menaces (U7476305) on Thursday, 14th February 2013

    Anybody needing it the first episode gets a repeat tonight.

    Thu 14 Feb 2013
    23:20
    BBC Two
    except Wales

    Fri 15 Feb 2013
    00:00
    BBC Two
    Wales only

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by heterodox (U14291406) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I thought that this programme (broadcast 19th.Feb)was very interesting and the smart in appearance and manner train-driver whose contributions ran throughout was impressive and much more what I expected.
    Sympathy was due to security staff in their attempts to prevent metal-theft but I thought that they were far too lenient in their dealings with drunks. Drunks on stations and on trains threaten the safety and interfere with the comfort of ordinary passengers and they should not be tolerated. Not dealing very firmly with an obvious drunk who attempted to go up on the down escalator and another who urinated on the floor in full view of other station-users sent, I thought, the wrong message.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by the cycling gardener (U2350416) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I found that manager annoying with his powerpoint/business speak rubbish.

    Indeed, I reckon most of us do ! smiley - smiley 
    I couldn't help thinking of David Brent in The Office - all that back slapping happy chappy stuff and looks to camera.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by jannemieke (U9267858) on Wednesday, 20th February 2013

    I thought that this programme (broadcast 19th.Feb)was very interesting and the smart in appearance and manner train-driver whose contributions ran throughout was impressive and much more what I expected.
    Sympathy was due to security staff in their attempts to prevent metal-theft but I thought that they were far too lenient in their dealings with drunks. Drunks on stations and on trains threaten the safety and interfere with the comfort of ordinary passengers and they should not be tolerated. Not dealing very firmly with an obvious drunk who attempted to go up on the down escalator and another who urinated on the floor in full view of other station-users sent, I thought, the wrong message. 


    Why send the police to an unmanned railway station on the ale trail, because some drunks have to be supervised. Here in Flanders you have to behave and if you don't and something happens, bad luck. The responsibility is up to the train user.

    Otherwise interesting program, interesting workers. smiley - ok

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by the cycling gardener (U2350416) on Thursday, 21st February 2013

    Drunks aren't allowed to board aircraft. Isn't it time we had the same rule for trains and station platforms? They are a danger to themselves and other members of the public and extremely unpleasant/alarming/dangerous to be confined with in often unmanned carriages on the rail network - scary on their own but very intimidating and worse in rowdy groups.

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  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by StudioTwo (U1523477) on Thursday, 21st February 2013

    Drunks aren't allowed to board aircraft. Isn't it time we had the same rule for trains and station platforms? They are a danger to themselves and other members of the public and extremely unpleasant/alarming/dangerous to be confined with in often unmanned carriages on the rail network - scary on their own but very intimidating and worse in rowdy groups.  I agree about drunks. Isn't it illegal for pubs to serve these people?

    It's interesting that the "West Yorkshire Ale Trail" was depicted in a poor light, as this used to be a great day out - and indeed was promoted by the rail companies (a leaflet was produced detailing all the stops / pubs). It was aimed at real ale drinkers and ramblers. Sadly, the "lager louts" in fancy dress have ruined this for all concerned.

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  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Stebie (U15642137) on Saturday, 9th March 2013

    This is an interesting series about the railways, how they work and the people that operate it. What spoils it for me however is that each of the episodes so far appears to have had bunches of drunks as its central theme. It's a certain kind of documentary film making that thinks this is interesting and relevant for us to watch. No it's not interesting. It's just annoying. Why are the programme makers so intent to push this aspect? We've had the drunks in Leeds station, the beer crawl in Yorkshire, the Liverpool supporters at Euston. Tons of footage of the cameras following bunches of paralytic badly behaved people. It's not funny or interesting, just banal and gives the impression that the whole country is just about drunks and controlling them.


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  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by billy_bumble (U14467942) on Sunday, 10th March 2013

    Isn't it these days?

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  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Sunday, 10th March 2013

    I thought that this programme (broadcast 19th.Feb)was very interesting and the smart in appearance and manner train-driver whose contributions ran throughout was impressive and much more what I expected.
    Sympathy was due to security staff in their attempts to prevent metal-theft but I thought that they were far too lenient in their dealings with drunks. Drunks on stations and on trains threaten the safety and interfere with the comfort of ordinary passengers and they should not be tolerated. Not dealing very firmly with an obvious drunk who attempted to go up on the down escalator and another who urinated on the floor in full view of other station-users sent, I thought, the wrong message. 


    Why send the police to an unmanned railway station on the ale trail, because some drunks have to be supervised. Here in Flanders you have to behave and if you don't and something happens, bad luck. The responsibility is up to the train user.

    Otherwise interesting program, interesting workers. smiley - ok 
    as you say drunks on or near trains are a menace to everyone, but if they were firmly treated ,ie thrown in a room to sober up , and then had to pay extra to get home, there would be some rights lawyer to say thier freedom to do as they pleased had been violated, never mind the sober peoples right not to be inconvenienced by them.Judges have got to start finding in favour of the law abiding majority and not theese louts. I will still watch next weeks show , it has one item were inconsiderate dog walkers who have baged up fido's mess then throw it on to the railway line, not put it in a bin as civilised people do . ie the point about metal theft, some times they get a self inflicted death penalty,when they cut the live overhead conductor wire.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by PetPig (U9766236) on Monday, 11th March 2013

    This is an interesting series about the railways, how they work and the people that operate it. What spoils it for me however is that each of the episodes so far appears to have had bunches of drunks as its central theme. It's a certain kind of documentary film making that thinks this is interesting and relevant for us to watch. No it's not interesting. It's just annoying. Why are the programme makers so intent to push this aspect? We've had the drunks in Leeds station, the beer crawl in Yorkshire, the Liverpool supporters at Euston. Tons of footage of the cameras following bunches of paralytic badly behaved people. It's not funny or interesting, just banal and gives the impression that the whole country is just about drunks and controlling them.


     
    I don't agree Steve. The programme, whether or not you are willing to admit it, holds a mirror up to modern society. Similarly interesting in a sociological way was the number of passengers who could not even give a basic 'thank you' to that nice young guy on the information desk.

    It may be shocking to those of us who don't work on various 'front lines', such as the Police,Health Service, schools, etc., but I think the programme is a fair reflection of our 'Me First' society.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by noviomagus (U9545153) on Monday, 11th March 2013

    This is an interesting series about the railways, how they work and the people that operate it. What spoils it for me however is that each of the episodes so far appears to have had bunches of drunks as its central theme. It's a certain kind of documentary film making that thinks this is interesting and relevant for us to watch. No it's not interesting. It's just annoying. Why are the programme makers so intent to push this aspect? We've had the drunks in Leeds station, the beer crawl in Yorkshire, the Liverpool supporters at Euston. Tons of footage of the cameras following bunches of paralytic badly behaved people. It's not funny or interesting, just banal and gives the impression that the whole country is just about drunks and controlling them.


     
    I don't agree Steve. The programme, whether or not you are willing to admit it, holds a mirror up to modern society. Similarly interesting in a sociological way was the number of passengers who could not even give a basic 'thank you' to that nice young guy on the information desk.

    It may be shocking to those of us who don't work on various 'front lines', such as the Police,Health Service, schools, etc., but I think the programme is a fair reflection of our 'Me First' society. 
    Good comment Pet Pig.

    What would Tremendous Knowledge Dave be like on the Information Desk ? Someone not saying 'Thank you' ...aside to camera 'Fair enough'............

    smiley - smiley

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Guv-nor __ Demanding chocolate with menaces (U7476305) on Tuesday, 12th March 2013

    Episode 5 tonight, with I suspect more drunks.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by jannemieke (U9267858) on Tuesday, 12th March 2013

    Guv-nor, really? smiley - winkeye

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by stirling (U13732738) on Tuesday, 12th March 2013

    Episode 5 tonight, with I suspect more drunks. 

    It's only been on 5 mins and already two cans of lager consficated. smiley - laugh

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Green Soap (U899978) on Tuesday, 12th March 2013

    The material could be an interesting subject, but it's badly edited, and very disjointed.

    There doesn't seem to be a theme running throughout the programmes, other than last weeks advertorial with Beardie Trains.

    Shame.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    Last night was very much the sweeping up of the shots in the series.

    if it had just concentrate the Welsh valley and the Liverpool railways . and not have the East Coast main line (we had seen that in ep 1) and the keeping the fly tipping etc -which lies better with one on Infrastructure ..

    It would have made a very interesting "contrast and compare" on those two "commuter lines" and they both had a major event to handle lots of (drunken?) passengers.....

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by billy_bumble (U14467942) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    Interesting wasn't it how relatively well behaved the Rugby crowd was ?

    Just saying

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    Though I am sure it was done with the best of intentions, it seemed remarkably naive of the railway company to allow the human ashes to be buried by the track.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Martyn (U14949330) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    Though I am sure it was done with the best of intentions, it seemed remarkably naive of the railway company to allow the human ashes to be buried by the track.  Why? The person who's ashes they were was a former railwayman and it's well known that many railwaymen have their ashes either buried or scattered close to a railway. Foresight is a wonderful thing, but it wouldn't have even been considered that 18 years after the ashes were buried, the son would want them retrieving so that they could be buried with his seriously ill mother.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    so that they could be buried with his seriously ill mother. 
    I'm hoping that he was going to wait...

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    Scattered ashes among stone ballast is one thing, but to bury a receptacle very close to the track, with an adjacent commemorative plaque, is another.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    The material could be an interesting subject, but it's badly edited, and very disjointed.

    There doesn't seem to be a theme running throughout the programmes, other than last weeks advertorial with Beardie Trains.

    Shame. 
    you may not like Richard Branson, but he usually hires people who can get the job done, also Virgin Trains is 49% owned by Stagecoach.
    as to the other major player in the Railways ,First group, there was plenty of shots of thier Great Western Trains , but as they were expresses going through the level crossing, you may have missed them. in some parts of the far west country First Group were known as worst group

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Wednesday, 13th March 2013

    The material could be an interesting subject, but it's badly edited, and very disjointed.

    There doesn't seem to be a theme running throughout the programmes, other than last weeks advertorial with Beardie Trains.

    Shame. 
    "There doesn't seem to be a theme running throughout the programmes"

    Title says it all......does it need a theme....But the sub title to last nights was 'Railway on my Doorstep'.


    It's a Great Series.


    But the Old Lady on that Rail Crossing last night.smiley - yikes

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by the cycling gardener (U2350416) on Thursday, 14th March 2013

    6000 people applied for 9 apprenticeships. One of the lucky nine was a young lady who failed to move the lever to manually change the points, made a mess of her announcement, chewed gum while training and seemed to treat the scheme as a bit of a laugh. What on earth were the other 5991 applicants like if this is what they failed against? The young Slovakian man was much more professional.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Friday, 15th March 2013

    6000 people applied for 9 apprenticeships. One of the lucky nine was a young lady who failed to move the lever to manually change the points, made a mess of her announcement, chewed gum while training and seemed to treat the scheme as a bit of a laugh. What on earth were the other 5991 applicants like if this is what they failed against? The young Slovakian man was much more professional.  Hi Cg , where you fully proficient when you first started you job, or did you make mistakes .as for Changeing ponts I am sure theres a techneque to it . I know even 2ft guage points need a good shove.
    when I first started to learn to drive a 30ft coach I found it quite a chalenge as I had only driven a Mini, I made mistakes but got better and eventually got my psv licence

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by the cycling gardener (U2350416) on Friday, 15th March 2013

    Hi OG. I was fully proficient when I first started my job. I went through a rigorous selection procedure to get it. In the 1980's when I first started out you paid for mistakes with unemployment - at least in my job. I realise the young woman was on a training scheme which is the place to make mistakes and learn from them and I would have forgiven the mistakes had she adopted a more professional attitude. I expect her to cruise in the job and do just enough to get by. I hope I'm wrong.

    By the way, I was given the opportunity to change points in a signal box that was to be decommissioned on the main line north from Kings Cross many years ago. It was really exciting and an absolute thrill!

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Tuesday, 19th March 2013

    "Rails eroded by damp", that's a new one on me, I thought that was the trains' job.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Tuesday, 19th March 2013

    Spot the Uisteach smiley - yikes.

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by The Polemicist (U14349342) on Tuesday, 19th March 2013

    What actually is it with the BBC and its apparent obsession with trains and the British railway system?

    First we had Micheal Portillo and two of his Great British Railway Journeys series, which is then quickly followed by Dan Snow's History of the Railways.

    I also find it rather incredible how the BBC somehow managed to stretch this entire documentary series out to a full six episodes. Talk about a lot of padding material.

    Although, admittedly, there did exist some rather interesting bits, there was also quite a considerable lot of repetitive film footage of the same old thing that, in my opinion, should have really been cut out during the final edit.

    I mean how many times did we actually want to see drunk, rude and rowdy passengers behaving badly and insulting railway staff?

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by noviomagus (U9545153) on Wednesday, 20th March 2013

    What actually is it with the BBC and its apparent obsession with trains and the British railway system?

    First we had Micheal Portillo and two of his Great British Railway Journeys series, which is then quickly followed by Dan Snow's History of the Railways.

    I also find it rather incredible how the BBC somehow managed to stretch this entire documentary series out to a full six episodes. Talk about a lot of padding material.

    Although, admittedly, there did exist some rather interesting bits, there was also quite a considerable lot of repetitive film footage of the same old thing that, in my opinion, should have really been cut out during the final edit.

    I mean how many times did we actually want to see drunk, rude and rowdy passengers behaving badly and insulting railway staff? 
    Did anyone mention 'Bradshaw' ?

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by joeville (U1065277) on Wednesday, 20th March 2013


    What actually is it with the BBC and its apparent obsession with trains  

    Trains are the future, they go fast now and you can enjoy a read and a drink on your way to your destination without the hassle of driving or flying.


    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by LadyAlice (U2796582) on Wednesday, 20th March 2013


    I watched the whole of this series and found it very interesting. I shall be far more sympathetic when there are delays in future knowing how many thoroughly nice and hardworking people there are trying to put things right in dreadful conditions (though train delayed by pheasant is a bit harder to understand...)

    So many of the staff had to put up with such appalling behaviour by members of the travelling public it was a wonder they managed to retain a sense of humour. I thought yesterday's female train driver was a delight (I loved the wife who got on, and the husband who was so horrified at the idea of a woman driving his train that he stayed behind and caught the next one!) And the men who have to repair and clean a train involved in a suicide deserve a medal.

    The chap whose job it is to maintain the track between the infrequent Highland trains, wandering the line, removing bits of dead deer and content with his task and the amazing scenery - lovely stuff.


    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Wednesday, 20th March 2013


    I watched the whole of this series and found it very interesting. I shall be far more sympathetic when there are delays in future knowing how many thoroughly nice and hardworking people there are trying to put things right in dreadful conditions (though train delayed by pheasant is a bit harder to understand...)

    So many of the staff had to put up with such appalling behaviour by members of the travelling public it was a wonder they managed to retain a sense of humour. I thought yesterday's female train driver was a delight (I loved the wife who got on, and the husband who was so horrified at the idea of a woman driving his train that he stayed behind and caught the next one!) And the men who have to repair and clean a train involved in a suicide deserve a medal.

    The chap whose job it is to maintain the track between the infrequent Highland trains, wandering the line, removing bits of dead deer and content with his task and the amazing scenery - lovely stuff.


     
    "The chap whose job it is to maintain the track between the infrequent Highland trains, wandering the line, removing bits of dead deer and content with his task and the amazing scenery - lovely stuff."

    Ian had a great 'Office'.....but that first dead Animal he moved; I thought a Rat was going to jump out.


    Really enjoyed this series, show the Day to Day work of the Railways.

    More please...smiley - cool

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Thursday, 21st March 2013


    I watched the whole of this series and found it very interesting. I shall be far more sympathetic when there are delays in future knowing how many thoroughly nice and hardworking people there are trying to put things right in dreadful conditions (though train delayed by pheasant is a bit harder to understand...)

    So many of the staff had to put up with such appalling behaviour by members of the travelling public it was a wonder they managed to retain a sense of humour. I thought yesterday's female train driver was a delight (I loved the wife who got on, and the husband who was so horrified at the idea of a woman driving his train that he stayed behind and caught the next one!) And the men who have to repair and clean a train involved in a suicide deserve a medal.

    The chap whose job it is to maintain the track between the infrequent Highland trains, wandering the line, removing bits of dead deer and content with his task and the amazing scenery - lovely stuff.


     
    What about the Lady/woman/ female( take your pick) when comenting on her first suicde when she was driving, she was glad she was older when it happened because ,I believe she said if she had been a newly qualified driver it would have finished her as driver,because all you can do is apply the brakes and close your eyes, but you still hear the bump. glad I was only a bus driver we could have tried to swerve out of the way or an emergecy stop at 30mph or less with a 11 ton bus is different to an emergency stop with a 400 ton train at 95/125 mph

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