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Great British Menu - New Series

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 145
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Bouillaguet (U14312340) on Monday, 28th January 2013

    There is a new series of GBM starting this evening, in honour of 25th anniversary of Red Nose Day. Rather scraping the bottom of the barrel IMO; I used to really enjoy it, but it's now getting a bit tedious.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by lesleylove (U4947890) on Tuesday, 29th January 2013

    Well I enjoyed it but am still baffled about how the judges judge! I though the first lad did well though his food did look a big messy. 2nd offering wasn't that exciting (under cooked bird!) and what was with the centrefuge? I won't tell you what my engineer husband was yelling at the TV!!! 3rd was nice but you could leave out the egg yolk swimming about in the broth for me! smiley - yikes Looking forward to the rest of the series as this is more light hearted than the usual one.....

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Tuesday, 29th January 2013

    This is rubbish.
    Dull dull, TV, and the idea of looking for humour in cooking is so silly it should be junked swiftly.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by angelictennisfan (U8898769) on Wednesday, 30th January 2013

    There is a new series of GBM starting this evening, in honour of 25th anniversary of Red Nose Day. Rather scraping the bottom of the barrel IMO; I used to really enjoy it, but it's now getting a bit tedious.  Have to agree - it's getting silly now. Real barrel scraping.

    I've decided to give it a miss this year.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by grannycool (U14401044) on Wednesday, 30th January 2013


    I've long been a fan of this programme, however after Monday's ridiculous dishes I also will be giving it a miss this year. The idea of 'humour' in a dish is just nonsense.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Wednesday, 30th January 2013

    I watched the first one and I just didn't connect with it. However, I am not sure if its the programme, over indulgence of self-important luvvie chefs or change in the economic climate. I much preferred the earlier series, which promoted British produce and cuisine, and didn't have the 3 chef knockout rounds. But, of course, being the success it was, someone had to come along and tinker with the format.

    Unfortunately, some celebrity chefs have not done themselves any favours and don't seem particularly likeable despite their talent, e.g. Marcus Waring, the twitter ranters at the amateur blogger.

    With everything that's going on in the word and the poverty Comic Relief is seeking to highlight, the programme feels petty and jarring.

    In general, I think there is a shift away from this kind of programme, just look at the success of GBBO and renaissance of straight-forward cooks like Mary Berry. I think it needs a rest and refocus.

    Also, who's paying for all this foodand the banquet? does it come out of the money raised for Comic Relief?

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Wednesday, 30th January 2013

    I wont watch any more, and certainly not the judging , when an arrogant and pompous Matthew Fort will be opining that that a given dish doesn't amuse him sufficiently.

    You just see.


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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by goodhelenstar (U13943062) on Wednesday, 30th January 2013

    Sorry to say I agree. This will go on for weeks and weeks, with soundbites from the chefs and squabbles between Oliver and Matthew. The series I enjoyed was the street party theme, in which Tom Kerridge won the main course heat. It's really been downhill all the way since then with ever sillier themes that the chefs struggle to fulfil because it's counter to what they normally do.

    A one-off for Comic Relief would have been fine (a bit like Christmas Strictly Come Dancing) and would have allowed the chefs, perhaps a different set of chefs each evening, to be really whacky and have a laugh. But this is painful.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by christopherdraws (U15347512) on Wednesday, 30th January 2013

    I've watched the last 10 mins of this programme for the past two nights - is it only me who finds Richard Corrigan's speech patterns highly irritating? It's like he's reading his lines off the far wall; the odd pauses and bizarre intonation make it sound like a French and Saunders spoof.

    The requests to the chefs to justify their dishes also seem pointless: "Does the asparagus work with this dish?" "Yes, it does". I'm also hoping one will say "No, I'm an imbecile".

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Thursday, 31st January 2013

    I've watched the last 10 mins of this programme for the past two nights - is it only me who finds Richard Corrigan's speech patterns highly irritating? It's like he's reading his lines off the far wall; the odd pauses and bizarre intonation make it sound like a French and Saunders spoof.

    The requests to the chefs to justify their dishes also seem pointless: "Does the asparagus work with this dish?" "Yes, it does". I'm also hoping one will say "No, I'm an imbecile". 
    Not just his speech patterns. I find his pompous self importance extremely off-putting.

    " Whares da humorr " ? smiley - doh

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by March Hare (U14471018) on Thursday, 31st January 2013

    The little chap is totally off brief (good grief, not even the end of week one and I am suckered in!).

    What does he think is funny in a nicely presented plate of food? Do him and his family all sit round chorteling at a plate of pasta or giggle at a nice salad? I doubt it!

    I admit this series is stretching the 'final event' link. But I will probablly watch it anyway (bit housebound at present).

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by March Hare (U14471018) on Thursday, 31st January 2013

    Bump smiley - smiley

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by madoldhaddock (U14285633) on Thursday, 31st January 2013

    What has happened to Great British Menu this series? Bad production and the worst editing I've seen! Talk about dull - no shots of food but lots of very ponderous set ups with supposedly bantering chefs.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by wineguzzler (U4817930) on Thursday, 31st January 2013

    I had the first three recorded to watch during a few hours to myself thisavo and was so disappointed in this series thus far, what a load of poncey tosh, took a total of about ten minutes to wizz though it all ! Why not just concentrate on the COOKING and the chance to see some good chefs at work without all the VT bits and endless chat ?

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Jo T (U15598751) on Thursday, 31st January 2013

    I have always admired Richard Corrigan as a chef but for the past two sessions as a judge he does not refer to the brief and he clearly has his favourties how could someone who completley ignored the brief who said that he has not included any humour within presentation be awarded the second place- the judges never agree with him and it is completly wrong - let the judges decide all three as the resident judgedoes not know what he is talking about

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 1st February 2013


    Any other views on this programme?

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by March Hare (U14471018) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    Any other views on this programme? 

    Yes.

    Can we flambe Richard Corrigan? smiley - whistle

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by melisma (U14196901) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I have always admired Richard Corrigan as a chef but for the past two sessions as a judge he does not refer to the brief and he clearly has his favourties how could someone who completley ignored the brief who said that he has not included any humour within presentation be awarded the second place- the judges never agree with him and it is completly wrong - let the judges decide all three as the resident judgedoes not know what he is talking about  The only thing I can think of is that Corrigan really wants Tom Aikens to get through the judges - why else would he put through someone to compete with him that didn't bother with the brief at all? I felt very sorry for Matt.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Frogman87 (U15599114) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I couldn't agree more. My family have been watching me getting more and more wound up as the week went on but there was just a feint hope that sense would prevail in the end.
    It didn't.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by zen cat chmeifyoucan (U14877400) on Friday, 1st February 2013


    Any other views on this programme?

     

    I didn't watch it because from past experience I know it will be some run-of-the-mill cooks being judged by another run-of-the-mill cook, making food that I know I'll never want to eat.

    Along with the hairy Bikers More Drivel show which followed, the BBC demonstrated a masterful capability for producing an evening of unwatchable tedium.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Pandora (U15599216) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I was actually looking forward to the brief of 'humour in a dish', as I enjoy a bit of drama round the dishes, funky plates and clever ideas - remember Glynn Purnell's desert in the egg shell a few years back, or the golf ball starter, or the female chef who painted her desert onto the table cloth? All great fun to watch!

    However, someone should have maybe told that pompous muppet Richard Corrigan about the brief - how can a plate of pigeon breast get an 8, whilst the "disco beets" leave the competition???
    What an utterly useless judge!
    I feel for the young chef who got kicked out - he did everything according to the brief. Granted Tom Aitken is a fabulous chef, but how got that little cocky guy into the final???

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I have always admired Richard Corrigan as a chef but for the past two sessions as a judge he does not refer to the brief and he clearly has his favourties how could someone who completley ignored the brief who said that he has not included any humour within presentation be awarded the second place- the judges never agree with him and it is completly wrong - let the judges decide all three as the resident judgedoes not know what he is talking about  The only thing I can think of is that Corrigan really wants Tom Aikens to get through the judges - why else would he put through someone to compete with him that didn't bother with the brief at all? I felt very sorry for Matt.  But the brief...to produce " humorous " food is deeply stupid.
    Matt is quite right to ignore it.
    There are more important things in life than this silly contest..by refusing to go along with it Matt has my respect.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by melisma (U14196901) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    You might think it's stupid but it's the entire point of the show this time. If you think there are more important things in life, you are free not to watch it.

    However, it's unfair to penalise chefs that actually tried to follow the brief (which, btw, Matt was the young chef who made the effort, not the one that ignored it).

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I am not watching it..I watched the first two before deciding that it had gone to hell in a handcart this time..having enjoyed previous contests.
    What on earth is " humorous" food ?
    I dropped in long enough to see one of the chefs saying that as far as he is concerned what he wants to produce is food that tastes good. Good for him.
    And thats what I want to watch too. Chefs producing food that tastes good.

    Anyone know how the viewing figures are holding up compared to previous GBM's ?
    I bet they are down.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by lesleylove (U4947890) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I agree. Richard's marks were well off the mark! The young lad (Matt?) stuck to the brief and did some wonderful humourous but good looking food. Agree that Tom should have gone through but that cocky Cockney? No way. OH and I had a good shout at the TV and I am not going to watch the rest. Why have a brief and then just ignore it?

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by March Hare (U14471018) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    But the brief...to produce " humorous " food is deeply stupid.
    Matt is quite right to ignore it.
    There are more important things in life than this silly contest..by refusing to go along with it Matt has my respect. 



    Sorry I totally disagree with you. Why on earth join a competition that is being run in aid of COMIC RELIEF where the BRIEF is to produce food with a whimsical funny side if he had no intention of joining in? Would you support (for example) your son sitting a maths exam, but because he just wanted to, he wrote an essay on 'The Importance of Bring Earnest?'

    If he just wanted to cook grown up, sensible food then why not elbow his way in to one of the other 'normal' cooking shows. I think he just saw a way to get his face on TV and took it, and to hell with actually joining in. Arrogant little pillock.

    Ok, I am stepping off my soapbox and pouring a glass of vino collapso. smiley - biggrin


    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by March Hare (U14471018) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    'The Importance of Bring Earnest?'
     



    Obviously I meant 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (see, if I had typed that AFTER I opened the wine it would have been fine!)

    Oops

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by judimac (U2467704) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    Have to agree with March Hare Adam is a cocky, arrogant pillock! He hasn't even tried to meet the brief.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by ferval (U14315357) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    Didn't Tom Aikens get chucked out of a previous GBM for totally ignoring the brief?

    I can't help finding it distasteful that luxury ingredients and expensive fol de rols are being used in this case: wouldn't a better brief have been to ask the chefs to produce dishes using the type of foodstuffs available to those that Comic Relief endeavours to help and and that they be required to use some Fair Trade produce?

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Going_once (U14931925) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    I am another giver-upper on this series. I am really sick of seeing people "fiddling with food" - not in tune with the times. Agree, let's have Fair Trade incredients imaginatively produced with kitchen utensils. The only bit I saw in the ad break had a bloke sitting on the floor with a centrifuge??? Didn't seem to working - should sell it off for Comic Relief.

    Time for a reboot.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by christopherdraws (U15347512) on Friday, 1st February 2013

    When I posted my earlier message, I didn't realise that this was a special series for Comic Relief - I now understand the odd requirement for the food to be whimsical/humorous.

    I don't think this style of food programme really fits the brief: the Great Comic Relief Bake Off was brilliant because the contestants, whilst becoming more earnest as the programme developed, never took themselves too seriously and made the show funny and enjoyable. GBM has professional chefs competing who take their work seriously (some may say a bit too seriously); the appraisal of their dishes is serious; even the monotone narration is serious. What's comic about that?

    I suppose it would have upset normal fans of the series, but maybe the competitors for Comic Relief could have been intentionally poor - i.e. a few comedians - which at least would have been in the raucous, rebellious and.. ahem.. funny tradition of the charity itself.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Jinzani (U15603220) on Monday, 4th February 2013

    Still like this programme but I wish they'd drop the fake insults and staged antagonistic remarks; they just make the chefs look ridiculous.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by brora (U14803827) on Tuesday, 5th February 2013

    It's the staged looks they are all giving each other that's spoiling the programme for me. I understand it is a competition I am really fed up when the camera zooms in at the chefs glaring at each other - tedious to say the least.

    I saw Tony Singh up the town a few months ago and nearly spoke to him - I forgot I did not know him!!

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by March Hare (U14471018) on Tuesday, 5th February 2013

    I always enjoy the Scottish heats as the chefs always seem supportive and good humoured with each other.

    It is also nice to see ALL the chefs following the comedy brief this week. I think Tony is brilliant.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by DelusionsOfAdequacy (U15449583) on Tuesday, 5th February 2013

    I've given up on this. Tired of the silly editing, tired of the mind numbing "So what do you think (insert name of celeb judge here) will be thinking about your liver and pineapple clown car?"/"So do you think you've done enough? Are you happy with the seasoning?" obviously scripted nonsense.

    I wish I could block it out and just watch the cooking but there's seems precious little cooking to watch.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by ~0c630ffa8b704d5ae71aebe05c93210977771348 (U15608892) on Saturday, 9th February 2013

    Why has the Friday judging programme changed? The judges' debating and scoring are the only interesting things about this weekly finale, yet all that has been cut in favour of showing them visiting the kitchen and having their make up put on. There is absolutely no suspense or tension, especially now that the judges seem to know in advance who cooked which dishes. And although we are told that the judges are now marking each dish rather than the menu as a whole, we are never told what those scores are, or see discussion of any length. The choice of winner now appears to take all of 15 seconds and the tension and surprise is zilch. Let them put their powder on before filming and return to the previous judging format!

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Horned Viper (U4404689) on Saturday, 9th February 2013

    Yes, it's rubbish. I gave up after week 1. Not sure why I even bothered with that really. Each series seems to have got progressively worse. Time to ditch this programme and come up with something completely different I think.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Thursday, 14th February 2013

    Its true...loved the postural echoing tonight as the scores were read though.

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by leadedbee (U5555345) on Thursday, 14th February 2013

    "I've given up on this. Tired of the silly editing, tired of the mind numbing "So what do you think (insert name of celeb judge here) will be thinking about your liver and pineapple clown car?"/"So do you think you've done enough? Are you happy with the seasoning?" obviously scripted nonsense."

    Yes, why can't the bloke who is supposed to be judging just make a 'judgement' like "Your seasoning wasn't very good" rather than this endless Socratic dialogue asking " So, are you happy with your seasoning?", "Do you think you've got the texture right?" , "Do you think my glasses make me look more learned?" and so on and so forth.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by lesleylove (U4947890) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    Last nights offering of duck smothered in blue cheese and then chocolate to look like a dogs poo was a step WAY too far........ I turned off and will staying turned off!!!

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by madoldhaddock (U14285633) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013

    I think the problem with the show now is that the chef judges seem too partisan. Tonight, here was a bit too much chef to chef blokeiness for me. " Oh I would do mine just like that" from Jason Atherton to the man who got 9 out of 10 for putting two mussels on a bit of sacking. And absolutely no humour then.

    Time to get rid of the chef judges and put in place some critics who could also add a bit of humour like Jay Rayner, Giles Coren etc for the judge roles. Even Angela Hartnett let me down (and I usually love her) Tony Singh should obviously have through.....

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 21st February 2013


    Here's the main discussion thread for this programme - we're wandering all of the place a bit now!

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Tuesday, 26th February 2013

    Oh dear, not a good start for two of last night’s chefs. I liked the picnic idea but I would have added a choux pastry wasp with olive tapenade stripes for fun. Thought the other bloke was going to cry when he was scored 6, he was visibly shaken & his comment at the end was very telling.

    I do wish that we, the viewers, could see "the brief". In nearly every series some chefs seem to be so wide of the mark that one wonders what exactly they have been told.


    I agree re last week's "dog poo" starter. That crossed the line and, IMO, showed disrespect for the food and the diners.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Rhoces (U11212688) on Tuesday, 26th February 2013

    Stop calling that woman "Rising star Emily!" We've got the message. She's a rising star but you don't have to keep on saying it!!!

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    Stop calling that woman "Rising star Emily!" We've got the message. She's a rising star but you don't have to keep on saying it!!!  I shouted that at teh screen last night. It was almost as if "Rising Star" were Emily's first given the names (in the manner of Moon Unit Zapppa).

    Thought the fish & cracking dish looked lovely but why call it Fish & chips if there were no chips of any kind? He could have put a (veery) few tiny cubes of potato, other veg or even polenta around the plate (I'm talking smaller than a little fingernail) or even "chips" of fennel or something.

    I'm wondering if someone might to an "end of the pier" pudding at some point - poshed up canyfloss, doughnut, ice cream - that kind of thing. Use one of those phone deckchairs as a prop.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Chelle (U3043549) on Wednesday, 27th February 2013

    What's happened to the comedy in this series?! the first few regions were all very creative when it came to putting comedy in their food and they succeeded in making people smile and laugh out loud, but recently there has been little to no wit at all. It's also been a little inconsistent between the different regions as some of the earlier chef-judges were really insistent on the comedy element, whereas later ones didn't even mark people down for having no comedy at all.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by smithy (U15632509) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Well after last nights showing that's me lost as an audience member. Every single chef has seemed completely biased in their judging and expected better of Tom Kerridge but his comments on the dishes didn't match up in the least with the scores awarded.
    Not as bad as when Corrigan was judging but that's it for me, seems to be who you know not what you cook and how it hits the brief at the moment!

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by daliscar (U15564228) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Well after last nights showing that's me lost as an audience member. Every single chef has seemed completely biased in their judging and expected better of Tom Kerridge but his comments on the dishes didn't match up in the least with the scores awarded.
    Not as bad as when Corrigan was judging but that's it for me, seems to be who you know not what you cook and how it hits the brief at the moment! 
    In my opinion its the brief that presents an insurmountable problem.
    Comedy is subjective...one persons idea of ' funny ' differs from anothers.

    And anyway why should food be funny ?
    The brief is daft.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by SometimesInvisiblePoster (U9636067) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    It's official! We are so miffed with the comment "Rising Star" which prob means, "but she wont be a shining star this series" that we are offering a 2 week all expenses paid holiday to our Chateaux in Invisible land, with a 4* Michelin restaurant, to whoever guesses, before 7.30. how many times she will be called that tonight.
    Does veteran chef mean s/he's past it. can't win?

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Rhoces (U11212688) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I think she'll be called Rising Star ten times!

    Report message50

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