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Growing up poor

Messages: 1 - 14 of 14
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by moondust123 (U13137194) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    I can't find anyone else who has commented on this very good documentary - sorry if I've missed another thread somewhere.

    Although this was predictably depressing in content, it also showed that, given a chance, those born at the "bottom" of society and in desperate situations can possibly make good. None of the girls or lads wanted to go down the sell-drugs-for-money route, even though that, or join the army and be blown to bits in Afghanistan, were apparently the only ways out of their "prison". All tried to make do on what little benefits they got. Particularly sad was the girl who wanted to be an actress and enrolled on the work-for-experience programme, but who, at the end of it, didn't get a full-time job. She then fell pregnant, and you can see the miserable cycle of poverty beginning all over again. She had so much before her. Now, I feel like singing "In the Ghetto".

    But saddest of all was Frankie from London - the intelligent, sweet-natured, student who was determined to educate his way out of poverty despite the impossible hardships. I wish I was richer - I would love to fund this boy's university education. I know the rewards would be the making of an amazing person who would contribute to society. He just needs a chance. Can we help him in any way?

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 24th January 2013


    Did anyone else watch? Any views?

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by silvery (U8422462) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    Doesn't look like. It was on BBC3.

    Sounds like one of those super-sentimental, pull-your-heartstrings type of stuff.

    Does anyone *fall* pregnant? And isn't there a rather large selection of birth control methods to choose from these days, which all UK teenagers will know about.

    Most full time higher education is only for two days a week, so yon Frankie could also get part time work (yes it's still about) to keep him going while he fulfils his dream.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by 5u55exPat (U14150756) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    I watched. It was very concerning that in a relatively wealthy country, people are growing up with so little hope. It was clear that in some areas it is almost impossible to get any kind of work.
    I felt very concerned for Frankie,. He did eventually find part time work after many experiences of voluntary work but he could only work during college holidays. It was really the prospect of having £27000 of debt to pay university fees that was making him feel he could never fulfil his dreams. At least he had a family, with whom he lived. Most of the young people featured had no family support and in particular two of the girls had not been raised by their mothers. Having a supportive family makes such a difference and emotional poverty is worse than financial poverty.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by devonia (U11270616) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    I saw the programme about the girls and yes it was predictably depressing but it also made me quite angry. For example, one girl, heavily pregnant was asking her mother for money for 'fags'. When told she didn't have any money, asked if she could have a used one from the ash tray. They all seem to have no money but always smoke and find the money for it.
    I didn't comment because i find it hard not to be judgemental and don't want to seem unsympathetic when I really am.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by zen cat chingfishismyangle (U14877400) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    Does anyone *fall* pregnant?  
    Yes.

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  • Message 7

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    Posted by zen cat chingfishismyangle (U14877400) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    They all seem to have no money but always smoke and find the money for it. 
    That's the nature of addiction.

    Goerge Orwell makes some interesting observations about smoking in Down and Out in Paris and London (or Road to Wigan Pier, I forget which).

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by silvery (U8422462) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    Frankie was in London. Lot easier to find work, many educational establishments.

    No-one has to pay fees upfront - payback time happens after you get work, and only earnings over a certain amount are calculated, and then only 10% a year.



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  • Message 9

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    Posted by Paul Longworth (U3384431) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    There is a much longer thread here -
    forums.digitalspy.co...

    This a really good forum and covers all stations, not just BBC

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by moondust123 (U13137194) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    I watched. It was very concerning that in a relatively wealthy country, people are growing up with so little hope. It was clear that in some areas it is almost impossible to get any kind of work.
    I felt very concerned for Frankie,. He did eventually find part time work after many experiences of voluntary work but he could only work during college holidays. It was really the prospect of having £27000 of debt to pay university fees that was making him feel he could never fulfil his dreams. At least he had a family, with whom he lived. Most of the young people featured had no family support and in particular two of the girls had not been raised by their mothers. Having a supportive family makes such a difference and emotional poverty is worse than financial poverty. 
    Yes, 5u55exPat, I agree. I started to watch this programme feeling very judgemental and ready to sneer at the spongers who live on benefits. I quickly changed my mind. All of the young people shown just wanted a chance. All of them wanted desperately to get off the benefit and into a job - any job - where they could earn a decent living, enjoy a beer at the end of a good day's work and perhaps buy a car. Their young faces showed not despair but the blankness of no hope as each day brought more of the same lack of opportunity.

    Gandhi said: "You are the change you wish to make" and if we don't do something to give these people opportunities to work now, I think we are sowing seeds of revolution and more violence. If the super-rich hoard their money, they are destined to live in gated communities, just like in South Africa, because eventually the poor will just come and take what they have.

    The 6 boys and girls in this documentary didn't want that. They were not violent. They were intelligent young people born into a hopeless situation and, except for Frankie and Shelby, could see no way out. And so what if they smoked? I couldn't begrudge them those 2 minutes of whatever pleasure cigarettes gave them in their bleak, hopeless world. I have a comfortable existence, but not enough extra cash to pull these young people out of the mire. Someone, please help them.

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by moondust123 (U13137194) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    Frankie was in London. Lot easier to find work, many educational establishments.

    No-one has to pay fees upfront - payback time happens after you get work, and only earnings over a certain amount are calculated, and then only 10% a year.



     
    Frankie did find work and was well respected and liked. He was offered a permanent job in a bar, but the hours would not have allowed him to continue studying, something which gave him so much joy, and something he excels at. He needs more help than is currently available. You can tell Frankie is a man destined to fly high, if only he can get some financial help. I don't know what to do.

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by moondust123 (U13137194) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    There is a much longer thread here -
    forums.digitalspy.co...

    This a really good forum and covers all stations, not just BBC 
    Thanks for this link. It has a good discussion on this programme.

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Arthur Sixpense (U10838182) on Thursday, 24th January 2013

    Not enough of this kind of programming. It is not attractive, but hey the UK is not all about comfy little cookery progs and cosy middle class pursuits. Look down your noses at these people, ignore their plight at your peril. I can see a time when rioting in this country becomes common place.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by briggsy2 (U1288489) ** on Friday, 25th January 2013

    The great tragedy of this country.like most Western Capitalist democracies is that there is plenty enough wealth for everyone to enjoy a decent standard of living if only we could find a way to distribute it more fairly. Misguided changes to tax, pensions and welfare brought in by the coalition Govt. mean we are moving in exactly the opposite direction at the moment with an ever increasing gulf between rich and poor. Like the last poster I fear for thew future and foresee more civil unrest like we had in London last year.

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