BBC Television programmes  permalink

Joy of the Single - BBC4 - 9pm - 23/11

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 1 - 50 of 81
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Bidie Its Cold Outside (U2747062) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    Just looking at those 7" circles of black plastic with their distinctive record labels bring back fond memories of spending my pocket money in Woolies every Saturday.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Do you remember buying your first single? Where you bought it? What it was? The thrill of playing it for the first time? What it sounded like? How it maybe changed your life? Lots of us do. Lots of us still have that single somewhere in a dusty box in the attic, along with other treasured memorabilia of an adolescence lost in music and romance. The attic of our youth.

    The Joy of the Single is a documentary packed with startling memories, vivid images and penetrating insights into the power of pop and rock's first and most abiding artefact - the seven inch, vinyl 45 rpm record; a small, perfectly formed object that seems to miraculously contain the hopes, fears, sounds and experiences of our different generations - all within the spiralling groove etched on its shiny black surface, labelled and gift-wrapped by an industry also in its thrall.

    In the confident hands of a star-studded cast, the film spins a tale of obsession, addiction, dedication and desire. The viewer is invited on a journey of celebration from the 1950s rock n roll generation to the download kids of today, taking in classic singles from all manner of artists in each decade - from the smell of vinyl to the delights of the record label; from the importance of the record shop to the bittersweet brevity of the song itself; from stacking singles on a Dansette spindle to dropping the needle and thrilling to the intro.

    Featuring contributions from Noddy Holder, Jack White, Richard Hawley, Suzi Quatro, Holly Johnson, Jimmy Webb, Pete Waterman, Norah Jones, Mike Batt, Graham Gouldman, Miranda Sawyer, Norman Cook, Trevor Horn, Neil Sedaka, Paul Morley, Rob Davies, Lavinia Greenlaw, Brian Wilson and Mike Love.  


    I will admit to The Pushbike Song by The Mixtures as my first single purchase. My older brother was slightly cooler with Mungo Jerry 'Baby Jump'.

    Usual talking heads format for the programme but they do seem a good mix and I bought a great number of Suzi Quatro records in my time. And Slade....

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Garrypenny (U9662607) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    I'm proud to say my first single purchase was 'Too Busy Thinking About My Baby' by Marvin Gaye during the fantastic year of 1969.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by goodhelenstar (U13943062) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    David Cassidy, How can I be sure. What can I say, I was very young ... To redeem myself, first LP was The Beatles' A collection of Oldies but Goldies. (First, I say - the later ones weren't out yet.)

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 23rd November 2012


    David Cassidy - that was one of my first too goodhelenstar... smiley - blush

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    The first single I ever bought was Needles and Pins by The Searchers in 1964.It cost 6/8p and I think it was a toss up between this and Diane by The Bachelors (well I was only 7)

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Logans Run (U13830424) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    Tiger Feet by Mud but now I cringe when I here it.I was young and foolish.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Bidie Its Cold Outside (U2747062) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    Tiger Feet by Mud but now I cringe when I here it.I was young and foolish.  Can you still do the dance?

    It featured at the Olympic Opening Ceremony - no need to cringe.

    I'll see your 'Tiger Feet' and raise you 'The Laughing Gnome'.......<rofl.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Sir Ad E Noid (U1525146) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    I'm pretty certain that the first single I bought with my own money was Blockbuster by The Sweet. A very underrated band they were too.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Bidie Its Cold Outside (U2747062) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    The programme that follows this

    Ultimate No1's At the BBC (who thinks of these titles? are they taking the p*ss?)

    also sounds good.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the UK chart, from the vaults of the BBC archive comes a selection of hits that attained the toppermost of the poppermost prize and made it to number 1 in the hit parade. From across the decades we applaud the most coveted of all chart positions with smash hits and classics from the Bee Gees, T-Rex, Donna Summer, John Lennon, Culture Club, Spice Girls, James Blunt, Rihanna, Adele and many more.  

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by FleetingEileenM (U14106338) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    My first was Whistling Rufus by Chris Barber.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by henryhallsdanceband (U1639084) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    I think mine might have been the Maggie May; You Wear it Well; Twistin' the Night Away, Rod Stewart EP 1972.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by David (U2017805) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    Good Vibrations by The Beach Boys. We convinced our parents that the 'b' side, Wendy, we had written ourselves, after we had learnt all the words by heart. I only realised recently when looking on a lyrics site for some music, that we had most of them wrong anyway.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Going_once (U14931925) on Friday, 23rd November 2012

    My first 7" single was "Not Fade Away"/"Little by Little" by the Rolling Stones, a local group in those days. I still have it - had to check the other side.

    First record ever - 12" Tommy Steele "Water Water Everywhere"/"Handful of Songs".

    I am sooooo old! smiley - whistle

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Garrypenny (U9662607) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Good programme last night, I enjoyed it but it would've been better without the dreadful whine of the tedious Holly Johnson.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by clootiedumplin (U14281026) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Does anyone remember getting the tedious job of putting the records (singles and albums) back in their covers after a party?
    Can't remember the exact first single I bought but it may have been an Elvis EP (try explaining that to the younguns today) with songs from the film Kid Galahad. He was on the front cover as a boxer. I remember choosing that in the local record shop between Christmas and New Year (when stocks were down after the Christmas rush) determined to spend my "Christmas money".
    Happy days!

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by ironman47 (U14302047) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Advertised yesterday, 40th aniversary of T Rex album The Slider,remastered with extera out takes ect., I can remember traveling into liverpool,by train to buy a copy of that album,from HMV,and I still have it,and do you know,it only seems like yesterday.smiley - cool

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Just looking at those 7" circles of black plastic with their distinctive record labels bring back fond memories of spending my pocket money in Woolies every Saturday.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Do you remember buying your first single? Where you bought it? What it was? The thrill of playing it for the first time? What it sounded like? How it maybe changed your life? Lots of us do. Lots of us still have that single somewhere in a dusty box in the attic, along with other treasured memorabilia of an adolescence lost in music and romance. The attic of our youth.

    The Joy of the Single is a documentary packed with startling memories, vivid images and penetrating insights into the power of pop and rock's first and most abiding artefact - the seven inch, vinyl 45 rpm record; a small, perfectly formed object that seems to miraculously contain the hopes, fears, sounds and experiences of our different generations - all within the spiralling groove etched on its shiny black surface, labelled and gift-wrapped by an industry also in its thrall.

    In the confident hands of a star-studded cast, the film spins a tale of obsession, addiction, dedication and desire. The viewer is invited on a journey of celebration from the 1950s rock n roll generation to the download kids of today, taking in classic singles from all manner of artists in each decade - from the smell of vinyl to the delights of the record label; from the importance of the record shop to the bittersweet brevity of the song itself; from stacking singles on a Dansette spindle to dropping the needle and thrilling to the intro.

    Featuring contributions from Noddy Holder, Jack White, Richard Hawley, Suzi Quatro, Holly Johnson, Jimmy Webb, Pete Waterman, Norah Jones, Mike Batt, Graham Gouldman, Miranda Sawyer, Norman Cook, Trevor Horn, Neil Sedaka, Paul Morley, Rob Davies, Lavinia Greenlaw, Brian Wilson and Mike Love.  


    I will admit to The Pushbike Song by The Mixtures as my first single purchase. My older brother was slightly cooler with Mungo Jerry 'Baby Jump'.

    Usual talking heads format for the programme but they do seem a good mix and I bought a great number of Suzi Quatro records in my time. And Slade....
     
    What a wonderful programme, and what memories of how small pieces of plastic can be so evocative.

    There were so many memories familiar to me I lost count. I can confirm that in many cases, you found that the B side was even better, and there are a few songs much loved in my family which were only B sides. Like many, I can remember the first single I bought, and a story behind it (Lovin' Things by Marmalade for the leavers' party at primary school, and feeling excited when one particular girl noticed when it was being played...). As for other posters on here, Mungo Jerry singles were VERY cool, because they were maxisingles which played at 33 and a third. Baby Jump had another track on the "A" side and a 9 minute sequence with two and a bit songs on the B side. Of course, the B side of Too Busy Thinking About My Baby was Wherever I Lay My Hat That's My Home, later a UK no 1 for Paul Young.

    Pride of place in this programme goes to Richard Hawley. When he spoke about watching the record go round and round, I thought "That's me!", as my head was flooded with memories of rotations of the Statue of Liberty (Liberty records), the bright red Parlophone label, the green Columbia label, and the little panels on London and Piccadilly records.

    Inevitably, the programme got sadder, with several different releases of Two Tribes. Surprisingly little was made about the CD single, especially the little disc, and the availability of music in a virtual format means the process of enjoying music is too clinical for many of us who loved the tactile pleasure of getting out the record and playing it on its own, or as one of several on the stacker (they were clever devices!)

    Another gem from BBC4, as was the number 1s show which followed.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Just looking at those 7" circles of black plastic with their distinctive record labels bring back fond memories of spending my pocket money in Woolies every Saturday.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Do you remember buying your first single? Where you bought it? What it was? The thrill of playing it for the first time? What it sounded like? How it maybe changed your life? Lots of us do. Lots of us still have that single somewhere in a dusty box in the attic, along with other treasured memorabilia of an adolescence lost in music and romance. The attic of our youth.

    The Joy of the Single is a documentary packed with startling memories, vivid images and penetrating insights into the power of pop and rock's first and most abiding artefact - the seven inch, vinyl 45 rpm record; a small, perfectly formed object that seems to miraculously contain the hopes, fears, sounds and experiences of our different generations - all within the spiralling groove etched on its shiny black surface, labelled and gift-wrapped by an industry also in its thrall.

    In the confident hands of a star-studded cast, the film spins a tale of obsession, addiction, dedication and desire. The viewer is invited on a journey of celebration from the 1950s rock n roll generation to the download kids of today, taking in classic singles from all manner of artists in each decade - from the smell of vinyl to the delights of the record label; from the importance of the record shop to the bittersweet brevity of the song itself; from stacking singles on a Dansette spindle to dropping the needle and thrilling to the intro.

    Featuring contributions from Noddy Holder, Jack White, Richard Hawley, Suzi Quatro, Holly Johnson, Jimmy Webb, Pete Waterman, Norah Jones, Mike Batt, Graham Gouldman, Miranda Sawyer, Norman Cook, Trevor Horn, Neil Sedaka, Paul Morley, Rob Davies, Lavinia Greenlaw, Brian Wilson and Mike Love.  


    I will admit to The Pushbike Song by The Mixtures as my first single purchase. My older brother was slightly cooler with Mungo Jerry 'Baby Jump'.

    Usual talking heads format for the programme but they do seem a good mix and I bought a great number of Suzi Quatro records in my time. And Slade....
     
    Incidentally, the reference to Woolies in message 1 is interesting, because it was the home of Embassy Records, where, for a bob or two cheaper, you could get passable cover versions of current hits on both sides of a single. I still have Nut Rocker by the Bud Ashton Trio.

    www.embassyrecords.c...

    I think the ages of those of us on this thread may make interesting maths! I wonder if anyone on here is under 50?

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Pride of place in this programme goes to Richard Hawley. When he spoke about watching the record go round and round, I thought "That's me!",  

    Yes and me. I used to try and read the label as it was going round.
    Even now I get annoyed if I watch a TV programme and they show a record player and you can clearly see that it's a blue label-Decca, Phillips or Fontana and then they put say a Beatles record on the soundtrack and pretend that's what is playing. Get it right! It's not that difficult

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Deacon (U14258455) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Just looking at those 7" circles of black plastic with their distinctive record labels bring back fond memories of spending my pocket money in Woolies every Saturday.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Do you remember buying your first single? Where you bought it? What it was? The thrill of playing it for the first time? What it sounded like? How it maybe changed your life? Lots of us do. Lots of us still have that single somewhere in a dusty box in the attic, along with other treasured memorabilia of an adolescence lost in music and romance. The attic of our youth.

    The Joy of the Single is a documentary packed with startling memories, vivid images and penetrating insights into the power of pop and rock's first and most abiding artefact - the seven inch, vinyl 45 rpm record; a small, perfectly formed object that seems to miraculously contain the hopes, fears, sounds and experiences of our different generations - all within the spiralling groove etched on its shiny black surface, labelled and gift-wrapped by an industry also in its thrall.

    In the confident hands of a star-studded cast, the film spins a tale of obsession, addiction, dedication and desire. The viewer is invited on a journey of celebration from the 1950s rock n roll generation to the download kids of today, taking in classic singles from all manner of artists in each decade - from the smell of vinyl to the delights of the record label; from the importance of the record shop to the bittersweet brevity of the song itself; from stacking singles on a Dansette spindle to dropping the needle and thrilling to the intro.

    Featuring contributions from Noddy Holder, Jack White, Richard Hawley, Suzi Quatro, Holly Johnson, Jimmy Webb, Pete Waterman, Norah Jones, Mike Batt, Graham Gouldman, Miranda Sawyer, Norman Cook, Trevor Horn, Neil Sedaka, Paul Morley, Rob Davies, Lavinia Greenlaw, Brian Wilson and Mike Love.  


    I will admit to The Pushbike Song by The Mixtures as my first single purchase. My older brother was slightly cooler with Mungo Jerry 'Baby Jump'.

    Usual talking heads format for the programme but they do seem a good mix and I bought a great number of Suzi Quatro records in my time. And Slade....
     
    Incidentally, the reference to Woolies in message 1 is interesting, because it was the home of Embassy Records, where, for a bob or two cheaper, you could get passable cover versions of current hits on both sides of a single. I still have Nut Rocker by the Bud Ashton Trio.

    www.embassyrecords.c...

    I think the ages of those of us on this thread may make interesting maths! I wonder if anyone on here is under 50? 
    My IQ is a little below that..

    My first single was " Walking Shoes " by Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker...get me,
    cool or what ...,and I used to snap my fingers to the backbeat. And wear shades..And acne.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Deacon (U14258455) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    The programme that follows this

    Ultimate No1's At the BBC (who thinks of these titles? are they taking the p*ss?)

    also sounds good.

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the UK chart, from the vaults of the BBC archive comes a selection of hits that attained the toppermost of the poppermost prize and made it to number 1 in the hit parade. From across the decades we applaud the most coveted of all chart positions with smash hits and classics from the Bee Gees, T-Rex, Donna Summer, John Lennon, Culture Club, Spice Girls, James Blunt, Rihanna, Adele and many more.    
    A weird ol' mixture...inevitable I suppose.
    Highlights for me were the live version of Umbrella, ditto the Adele song and 10cc.
    The slough of despond was the ever lugubrious and absurd " Imagine " and the deeply irritating and utterly tedious Mark Bolan.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Bidie Its Cold Outside (U2747062) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    I think the ages of those of us on this thread may make interesting maths! I wonder if anyone on here is under 50?  

    I am!!!!!!

    (until spring next year.....smiley - wah )

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Pride of place in this programme goes to Richard Hawley. When he spoke about watching the record go round and round, I thought "That's me!",  

    Yes and me. I used to try and read the label as it was going round.
    Even now I get annoyed if I watch a TV programme and they show a record player and you can clearly see that it's a blue label-Decca, Phillips or Fontana and then they put say a Beatles record on the soundtrack and pretend that's what is playing. Get it right! It's not that difficult 
    SNAP!

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Incidentally, the reference to Woolies in message 1 is interesting, because it was the home of Embassy Records, where, for a bob or two cheaper, you could get passable cover versions of current hits on both sides of a single. I still have Nut Rocker by the Bud Ashton Trio.
     


    There was a great documentary on Radio 2 a while back all about these type of labels and the whole "Top of the Pops" Lp's that featured cover versions. There were quite a few artists who were unknown at the time but went on to be famous such as Elton John and Tina Charles

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by leadedbee (U5555345) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Considering that BBC4 generally makes a good popular music programme, this was a bit of a dog's dinner I thought. There was no real thread or theme to it, I didn't learn anything new or interesting, plus a very uninspired list of talking heads (including perennial rent-a-quotes Maconie and Morley) and far, far too much Peter Waterman wearing an ill-judged leather coat - indoors.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    I think the ages of those of us on this thread may make interesting maths! I wonder if anyone on here is under 50?  

    I am!!!!!!

    (until spring next year.....smiley - wah )
     
    I am until January next year.

    Good to see Noddy Holder as an interviewee!

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Pride of place in this programme goes to Richard Hawley. When he spoke about watching the record go round and round, I thought "That's me!",  

    Yes and me. I used to try and read the label as it was going round.
    Even now I get annoyed if I watch a TV programme and they show a record player and you can clearly see that it's a blue label-Decca, Phillips or Fontana and then they put say a Beatles record on the soundtrack and pretend that's what is playing. Get it right! It's not that difficult 
    SNAP! 
    Me too! 'Heartbeat' on another channel had She Loves You playing at a party when you could see a record with the pink Pye label going on the turntable.

    This Genesis fan also thinks of Richard Harris's McArthur Park as one of the favourite singles of both Tony Banks and Steve Hackett.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    That's strange Bidie, I was sure you told us the same thing last year, but who is counting?

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Considering that BBC4 generally makes a good popular music programme, this was a bit of a dog's dinner I thought. There was no real thread or theme to it, I didn't learn anything new or interesting, plus a very uninspired list of talking heads (including perennial rent-a-quotes Maconie and Morley) and far, far too much Peter Waterman wearing an ill-judged leather coat - indoors.  This programme did not feature Stuart Maconie.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Deacon (U14258455) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Maconie was the presenter of " PS I Love You " which followed it.. yet another retelling of the Beatles story...
    I suspect that Maconie did not write it however, it lacked his trademark acerbic wit and insight..it was generally flabby offering notable only for the bitterness of both Gerry Marsden, who is clearly delusional about his place on the Mersey Beat pantheon..and Pete Best whose hesitant, inarticulate, and unconvincing musings gave the clearest sign yet concerning the reasons for his replacement. He simply wasn't up to being a Beatle.
    But the programme as a whole was largely platitude city.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by man-in-the-moon (U3655413) on Saturday, 24th November 2012

    Wasn't Paul Gambacchini available?He usually turns up on programmes like this.smiley - winkeye
    A bit of research would have found Buggles were not one hit wonders and had a follow up hit "Plastic Age".
    I certainly could relate to much of the programme.
    First record bought by myself, The Witch by The Rattles.First record bought for me Baby Love The Supremes.It all started so well.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    Wasn't Paul Gambacchini available?He usually turns up on programmes like this.smiley - winkeye
    A bit of research would have found Buggles were not one hit wonders and had a follow up hit "Plastic Age".
    I certainly could relate to much of the programme.
    First record bought by myself, The Witch by The Rattles.First record bought for me Baby Love The Supremes.It all started so well.
     
    No one had died recently!

    Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes were hardly one hit wonders of, say, the Vanilla variety.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Alf Hartigan (U2277114) on Sunday, 25th November 2012


    My fist 45 record purchase was Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs singing "Stay". I bought it for a 'girlfriend' to whose party I had been invited She played it once then never played it again.

    Recorded in 1959 and released in 1960 it was written by Maurice in 1953 when he was just 15, and is only 1m 35s long.

    He's 74 now.

    I didn't even have a Dansette at the time, but I still wish I'd kept it and bought her a box of chocolates instead.

    It's here if anyone wants a listen.

    https://www.youtube...

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Deacon (U14258455) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    I think most people will be more familiar with the much faster cover version by The Hollies Alf.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Going_once (U14931925) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    Ah!!! the dooh-wap-wap. Thanks for the link. Wouldn't have connected to the Hollies version.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Bidie Its Cold Outside (U2747062) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    That's strange Bidie, I was sure you told us the same thing last year, but who is counting?  I am aging in 'dog years' Germ.....but next spring is a biggie.....smiley - cry

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    I think most people will be more familiar with the much faster cover version by The Hollies Alf.  ...as opposed to the even slower version by Jackson Browne.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by redhotlady (U14317310) ** on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    First record I bought was The Urban Spaceman by the Bonzo Dooh Dah Dog Band . My sister and used to love the B side too . We loved that they burped on that song . I bought it in Boots with Christmas money, I must have been about 8 years old .

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    First record I bought was The Urban Spaceman by the Bonzo Dooh Dah Dog Band . My sister and used to love the B side too . We loved that they burped on that song . I bought it in Boots with Christmas money, I must have been about 8 years old .  I always thought Canyons of your Mind was very rude indeed, especially those naughty sound effects at the end, but then, I was a sniggering 11 year old when that single came out.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by margies (U14748929) on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    Can't remember what my first 7" was, but the first record I bought was a 78 and was Jim Dale singing 'be my girl'. My dad bought me an Alba record player for Christmas when I was 13 I bought the Jim Dale song (I was in his fan club) and I was also bought Malcolm Vaughan singing Chapel of the Roses and Harry Belafonte - Marys Boy Child. All 78s. I kept being told to put them away when i had finished playing them but just left them on the sofa. Anyway later in the day I got into a strop and flounced around and slumped down onto the sofa right onto the 3 records, and yes they were all smashed. My entire record collection gone. No more 78s after that.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by redhotlady (U14317310) ** on Sunday, 25th November 2012

    It WAS rude .....with plenty to snigger about .....I loved it

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by angelictennisfan (U8898769) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    Oh! I missed this - will watch on catch up, sounds great.

    The first single I bought with my pocket money was "It's for You" by Cilla Black and also one by Herman's Hermits whose name escapes me.

    For a lover of Northern Soul, it was all about singles. One of the most expensive pieces of 7" plastic is the wonderful "Do I Love You" by Frank Wilson, who died recently. There are only two known original copies of the single and when they come up for auction they make a small fortune!

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    I didn't learn anything new or interesting, plus a very uninspired list of talking heads (including perennial rent-a-quotes Maconie and Morley)  

    I've only just got round to finishing watching my recording of this. I didn't see Stuart Maconie in this .Were you mistaken?

    I thoroughly endorse all the comments made by Richard Hawley though. I've spent thousands of hours in record shops(mostly second-hand) during the 60's-90's looking for gems for my collection. The thrill of finding that elusive or rare disc is wonderful. These days it's far too easy .One click of the computer mouse and you can buy an entire artiste's output on a boxset

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    They made/make those few minutes of music magic tangible. You had/have to care for them.

    Then there was the paraphenalia - the racks, the sleeves, dust-bugs, the clack of the auto-change, don't touch the surface! .... carefully lowering the stylus, the hiss ..... and the smell of warm vinyl ....... 78 for a laugh and trying to read the label as it went round .....

    smiley - ok vinyl

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    They made/make those few minutes of music magic tangible. You had/have to care for them.

    Then there was the paraphenalia - the racks, the sleeves, dust-bugs, the clack of the auto-change, don't touch the surface! .... carefully lowering the stylus, the hiss ..... and the smell of warm vinyl ....... 78 for a laugh and trying to read the label as it went round .....

    smiley - ok vinyl 
    A pedant writes:

    Most 78s were made of shellac, not vinyl, and a far more brittle material. To my knowledge, only Pye released them on vinyl, so my family's copy of Baby Lover/Little Blue Man by Petula Clark has survived because it's bendy.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    I didn't learn anything new or interesting, plus a very uninspired list of talking heads (including perennial rent-a-quotes Maconie and Morley)  

    I've only just got round to finishing watching my recording of this. I didn't see Stuart Maconie in this .Were you mistaken?

    I thoroughly endorse all the comments made by Richard Hawley though. I've spent thousands of hours in record shops(mostly second-hand) during the 60's-90's looking for gems for my collection. The thrill of finding that elusive or rare disc is wonderful. These days it's far too easy .One click of the computer mouse and you can buy an entire artiste's output on a boxset 
    I know that feeling. It's like breaking out in a cold sweat or hairs standing out on the back of the neck. I've had this feeling twice: finding Run To Him/Walking With My Angel by Bobby Vee, an example of a B side that was a riot at family parties, but the old single broke; and getting my greedy paws on a copy of the original UK single of Abba's Ring Ring, ie the very rare release which pre-dates Waterloo and not the 1974 remix.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    They made/make those few minutes of music magic tangible. You had/have to care for them.

    Then there was the paraphenalia - the racks, the sleeves, dust-bugs, the clack of the auto-change, don't touch the surface! .... carefully lowering the stylus, the hiss ..... and the smell of warm vinyl ....... 78 for a laugh, and trying to read the label as it went round .....

    smiley - ok vinyl 
    A pedant writes:

    Most 78s were made of shellac, not vinyl, and a far more brittle material. To my knowledge, only Pye released them on vinyl, so my family's copy of Baby Lover/Little Blue Man by Petula Clark has survived because it's bendy. 
    Dosmiley - sadfacehhh! .... I meant speeding up the 45 vinyl to 78rpm shellac speed ..... but 78s / wind-up gramophones? .... something else very good smiley - smiley smiley - ok

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by bootjangler (U880875) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    1st single Jeepster by T-Rex. Or was it a christmas pressie? Certainly reminds me of christmas.

    And the horrible situation of stacking about 7 singles on the turntable pole of a record player, and four of them dropping at once.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by designengineer (U11181100) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    My first 7" single was "Not Fade Away"/"Little by Little" by the Rolling Stones, a local group in those days. I still have it - had to check the other side.

    First record ever - 12" Tommy Steele "Water Water Everywhere"/"Handful of Songs".

    I am sooooo old! smiley - whistle 
    Are you sure it was 12"? Singles were usually 10" - certainly my copy of Tommy Steele's "Singing the Blues" is on a 10".

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Monday, 26th November 2012

    I came across a range of re-issue 45s a while ago and bought quite a few ..... including three Telstars ........

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    No CD/ itunes/whatever is going to make me feel like that .............

    Report message50

Back to top

About this Board

The Points of View team invite you to discuss BBC Television programmes.

Add basic Smileys or extra Smileys to your posts.

Questions? Check the BBC FAQ for answers first!

Go to: BBC News Have your say to discuss topics in the news

Make a complaint? Go to the BBC complaints website.

BBC News: Off-topic for this board, so contact them directly with your feedback: Contact BBC News

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.


Mon-Sat: 0900-2300
Sun: 1000-2300

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

Recent Discussions

Copyright © 2014 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.