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the UK is NOT part of the USA

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 169
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by karinhere (U4065013) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Why has the BBC sent correspondents to the USA to cover the USA elections ?
    There is plenty of coverage on CNN, no need for wall to wall coverage by the BBC.

    The BBC identity crisis is becoming embarassing; please stop behaving as if the UK is part of the USA.

    The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween or elect a president on tuesday.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Andy (U14048329) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Why has the BBC sent correspondents to the USA to cover the USA elections ?
    There is plenty of coverage on CNN, no need for wall to wall coverage by the BBC.

    The BBC identity crisis is becoming embarassing; please stop behaving as if the UK is part of the USA.

    The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween or elect a president on tuesday.

     
    Blimey! Good to see geography teaching in schools is still up to scratch.

    So does this apply to everything going on in another country?

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by dangerousdave (U5075444) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I agree with you, karinhere. Who cares? Do the Americans have to put up with the same coverage of our elections?

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by 5u55exPat (U14150756) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Very important to see coverage of the US elections on BBC. The outcome, in which we have no vote, will none the less have an affect on us in the UK.

    More world news on the BBC would be a good thing. (not just wars)

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Glorious Technicolour (U4590479) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I agree with you, karinhere. Who cares? Do the Americans have to put up with the same coverage of our elections?  TV generally and particularly the BBC have a lot of air time to fill with their 24 hour news nonsense, also a big news team and a love of trips abroad. The US election is a gift to them.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Strange how all media outlets are covering the election -as they always have- in the same way-if I could be bothered to go back 4 years the same gripes would have appeared-the idea that it is some sort of holiday is nonsense-they are working

    Not everybody has access to CNN and to think that the BBC would not give this the traditional coverage or saying the BBC is biased towards the USA is also nonsense

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by ladystrictlyaddict (U13411599) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Those who are foolish enough to think the outcome of this election is nothing to do with us are being very short sighted imho.
    Remember that it was the tragic mistake that USA made in voiting the warmonger Bush in that led to so many of our troop being led into a war that was not our concern thanks to the toxic relationship between Blair and his buddy Bush.
    We must see beyond our own island - it matters to all of us.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Why has the BBC sent correspondents to the USA to cover the USA elections ?
    There is plenty of coverage on CNN, no need for wall to wall coverage by the BBC.

    The BBC identity crisis is becoming embarassing; please stop behaving as if the UK is part of the USA.

    The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween or elect a president on tuesday.

     
    What a ridiculous post. So the outcome of the USA elections will have absolutely no effect on the UK and the rest of Europe? How incredibly short sighted.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by grauniad (U6654468) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Half and half, I think. Yes, it is of great interest to us. But we have correspondents situated in the US, so sending Bill Turnbull does smack of a jolly.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Because:

    1) not everyone in the UK has access to CNN.

    2) like it or not, who runs the USA affects all of us, American or not - affects our economy, affects our trade, affects our security.

    3) it would be failing in its duty of reporting news if it didn't.

    Simples. At least that's the way it seems to me. And God forbid that I should have to rely on CNN to know how the election's going. smiley - yikes


    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by scott (U893166) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    "The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween"

    I think you will find it does as it was introduced to America by Irish and Scots immigrants in the early 19th century. It is also something i did as a boy 30 odd years ago in Scotland, long before the idea of trick or treat became the norm.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Why has the BBC sent correspondents to the USA to cover the USA elections ?
    There is plenty of coverage on CNN, no need for wall to wall coverage by the BBC.

    The BBC identity crisis is becoming embarassing; please stop behaving as if the UK is part of the USA.

    The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween or elect a president on tuesday.

     
    We have always been an outward looking nation taking an interest in the rest of the world and the BBC's enhanced coverage of the US presidential election is fully in that tradition.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012


    The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween or elect a president on tuesday.

     


    Not sure of the relevence of Halloween or if you see some sort of connection with the election. BTW do you still live in the Netherlands and admit to watching the BBC without paying for a licence?

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I've just heard on Radio 5 live, that the much admired and experienced political commentator, Richard Bacon is in Floriida to cover the US election. Yes, the US elections are relevant to the global politics but I am sick with oversaturation, media hype, unenlightening soundbites from US voters and the strong wiff of jollydom. I have never seen the same level of coverage for other countries. If a small BBC team is unable to provide commentary and reporting for all its media platforms, I query its capabilities.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by SATM67 (U14061947) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Obviously the result of the election is important for the rest of the world,and, as such, should be reported, and commented upon.
    But do we really need to know every last detail during the run up to the result?

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Steve (U896946) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Because the the boys and girls missed out on a summer trip to somewhere exotic for the Olympics, so to make it up to them, they go on a nice, all expenses paid trip , flying business class and staying in 5 star hotels, all at the licence payers expense.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Replies to several posts.

    Message 2
    So does this apply to everything going on in another country? 
    Well, it does for almost every other country.
    How much coverage do we see for any elections in Europe?

    Message 3
    Do the Americans have to put up with the same coverage of our elections? 
    They barely acknowledge them, or most other news stories over here.

    Message 4
    The outcome, in which we have no vote, will none the less have an affect on us in the UK. 
    What effect did the last profound change of President have over here? Not much that I've noticed.

    Message 6
    saying the BBC is biased towards the USA is also nonsense 
    This is demonstrably untrue. While the admittedly tragic hurricane Sandy was getting carpet coverage on the BBC, a devastating and fatal typhoon was virtually ignored.

    Message 12
    We have always been an outward looking nation taking an interest in the rest of the world and the BBC's enhanced coverage of the US presidential election is fully in that tradition. 
    All our broadcasters, including the BBC seem to be far less outward looking towards the rest of the world, than to America. E.G., storm coverage and election coverage.

    Message 14
    If a small BBC team is unable to provide commentary and reporting for all its media platforms, I query its capabilities 
    I bet the corridors of the BBC news department are like a ghost town at the moment.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by PaulHammond (U5000908) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    So - this is our regular "Why does the BBC make a fuss about US elections" thread? I still recall the ones from 2008.

    At least, unlike the "my god, there's a lot of tennis on during Wimbledon fortnight, and I'm really annoyed that sometimes Andy Murray matches overrun and knock back/off the pre-recorded programmes I wanted to see" threads they don't happen EVERY year...

    Paul, who is planning to turn on the Radio 4 coverage of the election after midnight tonight, because although I don't live in America, I do think it matters who wins and want to know what has happened.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Pat Shed (U4664057) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I've just heard on Radio 5 live, that the much admired and experienced political commentator, Richard Bacon is in Floriida to cover the US election 

    It's not just RB who's out there. They've sent all their political big hitters: Stephen Nolan and Lesley Ashmall amongst them.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Arnie S (U2223950) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I heard last week that Hallowe'en generates more for the economy than Valentine's Day.

    A lot of my friends share my strong interest in the US election as the outcome is important to the UK and the rest of the world. However I will draw the line at watching Dumblebore tonight.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I'd love to see more coverage of World News but Bill Turnball has been sent? Why? He is not a political correspondent.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Maybe they will have a barge on the river serving champagne and canapes like at our last election, the only difference being that it will be the Hudson River and not the Thames.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Because the the boys and girls missed out on a summer trip to somewhere exotic for the Olympics, so to make it up to them, they go on a nice, all expenses paid trip , flying business class and staying in 5 star hotels, all at the licence payers expense.

     

    Unfortunately, that's not factually correct - it's just how people like to think it is...


    www.bbc.co.uk/foi/pu...

    3.2 Air travel

    BBC travellers should use the lowest cost means of travel and fare. Travel should be booked via the BBC’s preferred suppliers. Significant savings can be obtained by specifying outward and/or return journeys at time of booking. Some airlines will also allow changes to fixed tickets for an additional charge and this may be cheaper.

    Hotel Expenses

    Room only £75.00 exc VAT
    Bed and breakfast £85.00 exc VAT

    . Meals whilst away overnight (for overseas see also section XIII.2. Meals)
    When necessarily away from base overnight, the BBC will reimburse the actual cost of relevant meals on presentation of receipts, up to the limits (including VAT and service) below:

    Meal Limit (incl. VAT & service)

    Breakfast £6
    Lunch £6
    Dinner £16

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Pat Shed (U4664057) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Breakfast £6
    Lunch £6
    Dinner £16 


    What about tea? Are BBC employees not allowed to have their tea? They must be starving.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Because the the boys and girls missed out on a summer trip to somewhere exotic for the Olympics, so to make it up to them, they go on a nice, all expenses paid trip , flying business class and staying in 5 star hotels, all at the licence payers expense.

     

    Unfortunately, that's not factually correct - it's just how people like to think it is...


    www.bbc.co.uk/foi/pu...

    3.2 Air travel

    BBC travellers should use the lowest cost means of travel and fare. Travel should be booked via the BBC’s preferred suppliers. Significant savings can be obtained by specifying outward and/or return journeys at time of booking. Some airlines will also allow changes to fixed tickets for an additional charge and this may be cheaper.

    Hotel Expenses

    Room only £75.00 exc VAT
    Bed and breakfast £85.00 exc VAT

    . Meals whilst away overnight (for overseas see also section XIII.2. Meals)
    When necessarily away from base overnight, the BBC will reimburse the actual cost of relevant meals on presentation of receipts, up to the limits (including VAT and service) below:

    Meal Limit (incl. VAT & service)

    Breakfast £6
    Lunch £6
    Dinner £16  
    And pretty long working hours to boot I should think.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Maxibaby (U14151672) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Bet BBC travellers are overwhelming Ryanair flights! smiley - biggrin

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Those are the rules for BBC staff - receptionists and the Manager for Paperclips. The "talent" will have their allowable expenses written into their contracts. Somehow I doubt that Graeme Norton flies to the Eurovision Song Contest with BudgetAir in Cattle Class and then carries his own luggage onto a bus to Mrs Miggins' Bide A Wee Guest House (£75 a night - Bathroom on every floor and No lifts. Breakfast fry up cooked in industrial strength grease).

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by brora (U14803827) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    "The UK does NOT celebrate Halloween"

    I think you will find it does as it was introduced to America by Irish and Scots immigrants in the early 19th century. It is also something i did as a boy 30 odd years ago in Scotland, long before the idea of trick or treat became the norm.

     
    I agree - kids went "guising" (trick and treat) in Scotland as far back as 1895!!

    On the topic in hand I fully understand the American election it is important but what I don't understand is how the BBC can justify all these news presenters over there. It is just not needed. Hew Edwards last night was visiting some long lost relatives or something in the back of beyond in America and spoke for all of 2 minutes - how much did all that cost and more to the point - why?

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Interesting link thank you.

    However, there are so many exceptions especially regarding overseas travel, the need to be in expensive hotels near the action, business cases for upgrading etc. and finally the policy only relates to BBC staff... there may be all sorts of perks etc included in the "talent" / freelancer contracts.

    Journalists etc need to travel comfortably and have adequate support. The issue is why unnecessary individuals plus all their support staff are covering the election? That is is the unnecessary expense.

    I think a little more time should be taken of point 1 on page 2:

    "Alternatives to travelling and mode of travel" and how it could apply to broadcasting.




    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Tuesday, 6th November 2012


    posted by Essential Rabbit

    They (the US media) barely acknowledge them (UK elections), or most other news stories over here.

     


    articles.cnn.com/201...

    articles.cnn.com/201...

    www.cnn.com/2010/WOR...

    articles.cnn.com/201...

    www.cnn.com/2010/WOR...

    articles.cnn.com/201...

    www.cnn.com/2010/WOR...

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    As well as that these "rules and guidance" read much like those for MP's - and we all know what that means in reality.

    Also note "BBC's preferred suppliers" - can we have a list of the BBC's preferred suppliers please Peta.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Excellent post, Essential Rabbit. I have no idea of the identity of the German Leader of the Oppostion and couldn't name a single German Parliamentary Constituency. But I know Romney's religion, employment hisory, wife, the names of some of his children and could list most of the "swing states". That is because coverage of US Presidential elections goes on and on and on, whereas for every other country we just get told: "Voters in X went to the polls today. The Y party is expected to win" and "The Y party has won the X elections. The US coverage is disproportionate.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012


    www.bbc.co.uk/supply...

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by PaulHammond (U5000908) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    The US coverage is disproportionate.
     


    So, you're not buying the argument that the US coverage is proportionate to the fact that people in the UK have a greater interest in the US elections than, say, for the sake of example, the Danish elections (I couldn't name Denmark's Prime Minister, for example - though I have heard of Angela Merkel, the German President, and I have a strong suspicion that German Federal States (like, say Bavaria) might have something to do with electoral constituencies there, just as it's the actual states in the US that put together the electoral college that ultimately determines the result of the Presidential election)

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    What you have not built into this GZ is that most Americans are so parochical that their "news" is "state news and not USA news.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by PaulHammond (U5000908) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I think there's a difference between saying "The US media does not cover foreign elections" (which is the statement GZ actually responded to) and saying "US people are not interested in foreign elections".

    CNN of course, having a world presence, will cover world events, and therefore it's easy for them to make world news available to those US citizens who ARE interested. I haven't looked at every link GZ provided to see if there was news provided by other US sources in that list.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Because the the boys and girls missed out on a summer trip to somewhere exotic for the Olympics, so to make it up to them, they go on a nice, all expenses paid trip , flying business class and staying in 5 star hotels, all at the licence payers expense.

     
    The amount of times this accusation is brought up ... have you proof of that? Not suspicions, not assumptions, proof?

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    What you have not built into this GZ is that most Americans are so parochical that their "news" is "state news and not USA news.
     
    I have found that a lot of Britons on these boards seem to be experts about what most Americans think. So I dont bother to argue the point. smiley - winkeye

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    In reply to GZ:

    Well of course you'll be able to find *some* items, but surely you're not suggesting the the leading US media devote anything more than a fraction of the time and energy on current events, news stories and elections in Britain.

    When did one of your major TV channels air a live speech by a British PM or opposition leader about entirely internal matters?

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Tuesday, 6th November 2012


    posted by Essential Rabbit

    When did one of your major TV channels air a live speech by a British PM or opposition leader about entirely internal matters?
     


    That would be C-SPAN - a publicly funded broadcast channel. They cover sessions of Parliament, speeches and the like.

    www.c-span.org/Serie...

    www.c-span.org/Event...

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 39.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Many thanks Peta.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    The US coverage is disproportionate.
     
    So, you're not buying the argument that the US coverage is proportionate to the fact that people in the UK have a greater interest in the US elections than, say, for the sake of example, the Danish elections  
    No. Most people in the UK are barely interested in our own elections, never mind those in foreign countries. The coverage of the US election is not in response to audience demand but what the establishment thinks should interest us. Clearly, the US Presidential elections are of more interest and importance to the UK than Denmark's elections, but it's the virtual ignoring of elections in every other country, whilst covering the minutiae of US Presidential elections that I object to. Why are people in the UK fascinated by Hiriam G Diefenbacker's view of the world from rural Kentucky, but not in the least concerned about politics or politicians in Germany, France, Italy...?

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    That would be C-SPAN 
    Is C-SPAN the major television news broadcaster in America?

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Tuesday, 6th November 2012


    posted by Essential Rabbit

    Is C-SPAN the major television news broadcaster in America?
     


    Major broadcasters in the US are commercial. Their motivation is ratings and satisfying sponsors.

    C-SPAN is a non-for-profit, publicly funded network of 3 different channels, a radio network and website that devotes its entire coverage to national and international politics 24 hours a day year round.






    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    posted by Essential Rabbit

    When did one of your major TV channels air a live speech by a British PM or opposition leader about entirely internal matters?  
    That would be C-SPAN - a publicly funded broadcast channel. They cover sessions of Parliament, speeches and the like. 
    That is more a reflection of the US' thriving broadcast industry than interest in this country's politics. There is probably a channel devoted to showing live frog racing from Kentucky. Please don't perpetuate the myth that Americans are as interested in UK Politics, as the BBC and other UK media are in US elections. A poll showing the percentage of Americans who can name the Leader of the Labour Party and the percentage of Britons who can name the Republican Presidential Candidate would quickly show how nonsensical it is to claim that the degree of interest is in any way comparable.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by BothXP (U6274173) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Most people in the UK are barely interested in our own elections, never mind those in foreign countries. The coverage of the US election is not in response to audience demand but what the establishment thinks should interest us. 
    Can you back that statement up with any actual evidence ?

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Jan-Ann (U14322193) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    Obviously the result of the election is important for the rest of the world,and, as such, should be reported, and commented upon.
    But do we really need to know every last detail during the run up to the result? 
    Exactly - no we don't.

    As said, the result is important and will have a lasting effect on the rest of the world for a good few years, but the BBC's (and SkyNews) blanket coverage is enough to make one turn off the TV, (like the Royal Wedding/Jub/Olys). Indeed the local radio is on as background music instead of the usual news channel. Their news on the hour is enough thank you.

    More about the US election in two week than for the changes to the NHS in two years. We've been told where all the money came from for the election campaigns, how much it cost, shown speeches in full detail. I don't believe the BBC mentioned that Lansley's election campaign was paid for by a healthcare company or how our politicians have all got their hands in the blood bank.

    Glad when it's all over, (the election that is). We can't change the outcome and I won't be watching David D's 'swingometer'. Just have a look tomorrow and see.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Reservoir Hamster (U14288323) on Tuesday, 6th November 2012

    I don't quite understand some of the arguments here. The American presidential election is important and the BBC should cover it as they are doing. Why? Because America is the most powerful nation on Earth and the leader of the free world. I want to know what is happening there. Anyone who is interested in the world beyond his own parochial concerns ought to want to know about it too. Of course politics is not interesting to the kind of people who think stories about David Beckham's underpants are, but the BBC is doing its job and providing a good service for intelligent, enlightened and politically engaged viewers (who also pay the licence fee).

    Report message50

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