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Poppies on the BBC

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 84
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Mercury574 (U15481676) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Can anyone say if poppies are part of the wardrobe department at the BBC or do the people wearing them pay?

    Watching the pundits on match of the day last night and it looked like they had all been put on using a ruler to get them all in the same place on the chest.

    There is no point in wearing a poppy if a) it wasn't paid for and b) if it means nothing to the wearer and is just another prop from the wardrobe department. God knows these people earn enough to give a decent donation but do they?

    Lest we forget!

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by magnificentpolarbear (U1225328) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    As in previous years the answer is that no one is forced to wear a poppy.

    If a programme guest doesn't happen to be wearing one they will be offered one but it is not compulsory for anyone to wear one but if a BBC newsreader isn't wearing one there will be howls of protest from BBC critics.


    And yes they are paid for.

    As I type this I am watching Sky news and Dominic Murghnan is wearing his poppy but his guest, a Tory MP, isn't.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    And Editorial Guidance is at www.bbc.co.uk/guidel... over when they should be (not)worn.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by minimetto (U1159894) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Well, I imagine that the BBC needs to look pretty saintly at the moment so its staff must ALL wear poppies.........although IMO, November 1st is quite early enough otherwise can look as though people are trying too hard...

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    This discussion seems to have gone on for years. news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/...

    But the point to remember is, it is The Royal British Legion who sell the poppies and set the date of when they will start selling them. Doesn't it make sense that people on the TV start wearing them at the same time the Royal British Legion start selling them?

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Vizzer aka U_numbers (U2011621) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Doesn't it make sense that people on the TV start wearing them at the same time the Royal British Legion start selling them? 
    No.

    If the BBC is intended to reflect UK society then in my place of work, for example, not everyone suddenly starts wearing poppies on the very first day of the launch of the RBL's annual poppy appeal.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Yes, of course. The Royal British Legion poppy appeal is launched. Poppies are on sale. But the BBC presenters don't wear them yet. Why? Because some people think it doesn't reflet their own view of UK society and where they work.

    Got it!

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    then in my place of work, for example, not everyone suddenly starts wearing poppies on the very first day of the launch of the RBL's annual poppy appeal. 
    Do you have a few million people second-guessing your choices where you work? Might make a difference.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by altup (U15315707) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Jesus's birthday (according to tradition) is on the 25th of December. Would you celebrate your birthday for a month? I don't think so. Same applies to rememberance day.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by bootjangler (U880875) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    I think each guest on TV, and presenters should be clothed in fancy dress as giant poppies.

    Even if someone doesn't wear one, maybe they have contributed cash in some way. How does anyone know?

    And then we get people upset at white poppies.

    It has happened that snide comments have been made if I don't put in a tin at a supermarket (throughout the year for different charities). What if I only have a store card on me? What if I actually did give at the other shop earlier? What if I gave at work? What if I have a regular monthly outgoing from wages to charity?
    Who knows what I do?

    The direct, "you're not doing the right thing," when it comes to charity really annoys me.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Jesus's birthday (according to tradition) is on the 25th of December. Would you celebrate your birthday for a month? I don't think so. Same applies to rememberance day. 
    There's a difference between Remembrance Sunday and the Poppy Appeal - the latter being a fund-raising campaign, and thus needing several weeks to be effective.

    Anyway, Christmas Day is preceded by Advent, and has 12 days (On the 12th day of Christmas, my true love sent to me, etc.)

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Grandadpop (U3054464) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Jesus's birthday (according to tradition) is on the 25th of December. 

    Apparently so and even our Queen has an actual birthday and an official birthday to celebrate but I'm not altogether sure the 25th December is Christ's birthday.

    You see, we were taught Jesus was about 33.5 when he was crucified - which if correct, means he was born around October, not December, given that he was executed at Easter. So where did 25th December come from?.

    I find these historical anomalies quite puzzling. Surely someone must know?

    'G-G' smiley - erm

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by megamain (U12800305) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    "God knows these people earn enough to give a decent donation but do they?"

    They don't have to if they don't want to.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by DaveU (U14266810) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Can anyone say if poppies are part of the wardrobe department at the BBC or do the people wearing them pay?

    Watching the pundits on match of the day last night and it looked like they had all been put on using a ruler to get them all in the same place on the chest.

    There is no point in wearing a poppy if a) it wasn't paid for and b) if it means nothing to the wearer and is just another prop from the wardrobe department. God knows these people earn enough to give a decent donation but do they?

    Lest we forget! 
    This comes out every year and is very tedious! The idea of wearing a poppy is to REMEMBER the sacrifice of others who have died in the service of their country. It doesn't matter if its being worn as a BBC uniform code.It matters that people remember why its being worn!

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Logans Run (U13830424) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    I bet they are all wearing poppies on Eastenders next week depit being filmed many weeks ago.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by charmarr (U566862) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Jon Snow got a bit of stick the other year for not wearing one.
    He said he did'nt want to be seen promoting any charity while reading the news.
    Good on him I say.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    I find these historical anomalies quite puzzling. Surely someone must know?  
    As Patrick Moore famously said:

    There are some things we just don't know!


    Discussion of the chronology of Jesus here:

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by JanetDoe (U10211737) ** on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    You can buy poppies in various guises on line from the British Legion Poppy Shop all year round.

    Apart from selling their own poppies, they sell brooches, ear rings, stick pins, rings, tea towels, shopping bags, umbrellas, crosses, wreaths and all sorts of other poppy items. If it isn't their own product, 10% of the price (excluding postage) goes to the British Legion.

    Last year I bought a Buckley crystal poppy brooch for around £25.00 and £2.50 of that went to the Legion. This year I've bought a Kleshna crystal ring. I also put an extra donation in the collection boxes, but I don't take a poppy - they can save the cost of that one and let someone else have it.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by susiesar (U10941938) on Sunday, 28th October 2012

    Jesus's birthday (according to tradition) is on the 25th of December. Would you celebrate your birthday for a month? I don't think so. Same applies to rememberance day.  Jesus's birthday is celibrated far longer than a month! the shops are full of the celibratary tat now and the streets are gearing up to switch on the lights so your analogy doesn't really work.
    Why do we have this same discussion every year if someone wears a poppy as soon as they are available then everybody has to otherwise they would soon be accused of being disrespecful so they all wear them at once, silly but that's the way it is in these days of trial by media.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Andy (U14048329) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Here we go again.....

    People wearing poppies too early

    People wearing poppies too late

    Why is everyone wearing poppies?

    Why are some people not wearing poppies?

    Who pays for the poppies?

    What "statement " are people on BBC making by wearing a poppy?

    What "statement " are people on BBC making by not wearing a poppy?

    YAAAAAWN........!

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 29th October 2012


    Here are the editorial guidelines for poppy wearing at the BBC

    Remembrance Day is not long off and the period of poppy wearing will soon start.

    It is normal for the BBC to agree dates between which, for those wishing to do so, poppies may be worn on screen.

    This year poppies may be worn on screen from 06.00 am Saturday 27th October to 23.59 Sunday 11th November,

    Remembrance Sunday. Remembrance Day and Remembrance Sunday coincide on this occasion.  


    Guests and staff on BBC programmes can decide whether they would like to buy and wear a poppy on the programme.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by dj (U15482639) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    As in previous years the answer is that no one is forced to wear a poppy.

    If a programme guest doesn't happen to be wearing one they will be offered one but it is not compulsory for anyone to wear one but if a BBC newsreader isn't wearing one there will be howls of protest from BBC critics.


    And yes they are paid for.

    As I type this I am watching Sky news and Dominic Murghnan is wearing his poppy but his guest, a Tory MP, isn't.  
    So many of those ( presenters and guests) have not paid a penny to the Royal British Legion but appear on TV as if they had paid. Shame on them and the BBC for not asking them for a sizeable donation. They are after all paid to be on the screen.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    As in previous years the answer is that no one is forced to wear a poppy.

    If a programme guest doesn't happen to be wearing one they will be offered one but it is not compulsory for anyone to wear one but if a BBC newsreader isn't wearing one there will be howls of protest from BBC critics.


    And yes they are paid for.

    As I type this I am watching Sky news and Dominic Murghnan is wearing his poppy but his guest, a Tory MP, isn't.  
    So many of those ( presenters and guests) have not paid a penny to the Royal British Legion but appear on TV as if they had paid. Shame on them and the BBC for not asking them for a sizeable donation. They are after all paid to be on the screen. 

    No. If they wear a poppy they have personally paid for it.

    How much people pay for their poppy is down to personal discretion, just like in the 'outside world'.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    As in previous years the answer is that no one is forced to wear a poppy.

    If a programme guest doesn't happen to be wearing one they will be offered one but it is not compulsory for anyone to wear one but if a BBC newsreader isn't wearing one there will be howls of protest from BBC critics.


    And yes they are paid for.

    As I type this I am watching Sky news and Dominic Murghnan is wearing his poppy but his guest, a Tory MP, isn't.  
    So many of those ( presenters and guests) have not paid a penny to the Royal British Legion but appear on TV as if they had paid. Shame on them and the BBC for not asking them for a sizeable donation. They are after all paid to be on the screen. 
    You have zero evidence for that statement and unless you can prove otherwise you should withdraw it.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by stirling (U13732738) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Ah the annual "poppy wearing at the BBC" thread has arrived.

    Maybe Peta could "pin it" to the top of the page for the next couple of weeks. smiley - biggrin

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 29th October 2012


    I will if I have to - but I think it may just bob along happily on it's own! smiley - biggrin

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by DelusionsOfAdequacy (U15449583) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    So many of those ( presenters and guests) have not paid a penny to the Royal British Legion but appear on TV as if they had paid. Shame on them and the BBC for not asking them for a sizeable donation. They are after all paid to be on the screen. 



    Before crying "Shame!" you should have some evidence that it is warranted. I'm sure we'd all be interested to see it.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Monday, 29th October 2012


    I will if I have to - but I think it may just bob along happily on it's own! smiley - biggrin

     
    Just let it die!

    Please!

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by deansay (U5811575) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Anyway, Christmas Day is preceded by Advent, and has 12 days (On the 12th day of Christmas, my true love sent to me, etc.) 

    Eh? smiley - erm The 12 days of Christmas commences on Christmas Day, and lasts until Epiphany i.e. 12th Night!!! Advent lasts for 24 days!! smiley - biggrin

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Logans Run (U13830424) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    The last straw is seeing a news reporter talking to a bather who has a poppy taped to his naked chest.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    I agree. For goodness' sake, live and let live. This obsession of 'they're paid', 'it's our money', 'they earn enough', 'they should pay' comes up over and over again in every discussion, whether relevant to it or not. Idem the accusation, often unsubstantiated by proof, that 'they' are getting something for nothing.

    BBC presenters, comperes, etc, would be abused if they wore a poppy. They'd be abused if they didn't. If they didn't pay for them there'd be an outcry. If they do, there'll always be someone who'll claim they should pay more.

    All off us, on screen and off, have a choice to buy and wear a poppy, or not. Can't we for heaven's sake leave it at that, just for once?

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by deansay (U5811575) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    The last straw is seeing a news reporter talking to a bather who has a poppy taped to his naked chest.  smiley - laugh

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Lilians-Girl (U14561766) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    I agree. For goodness' sake, live and let live. This obsession of 'they're paid', 'it's our money', 'they earn enough', 'they should pay' comes up over and over again in every discussion, whether relevant to it or not. Idem the accusation, often unsubstantiated by proof, that 'they' are getting something for nothing.

    BBC presenters, comperes, etc, would be abused if they wore a poppy. They'd be abused if they didn't. If they didn't pay for them there'd be an outcry. If they do, there'll always be someone who'll claim they should pay more.

    All off us, on screen and off, have a choice to buy and wear a poppy, or not. Can't we for heaven's sake leave it at that, just for once? 
    I agree Rosemary.

    The British Legion began selling the poppies last week. Many of the old men and women selling the poppies fought in the last war. They are eager to sell as many as they can in order to make more money each year, because each year there are more ex military needing help after fighting in the many different conflicts since the end of WW2.

    The BBC will have the poppies on sale like most companies and it will be optional whether people buy or not, and they will have a choice.

    It beggars belief that each year we have the same discussion about the wearing of poppies on TV. Why is it so important to know? I couldn't care less what anyone else does, whether next door or on TV. Just live and let live please. It isn't important, and I'll now retire and wait for some more flak!

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    It beggars belief that each year we have the same discussion about the wearing of poppies on TV. Why is it so important to know? I couldn't care less what anyone else does, whether next door or on TV. Just live and let live please. It isn't important, and I'll now retire and wait for some more flak!  Well before you duck, Lillians-girl, please accept a relieved 'thank you!' from someone who feels the same way as I do! smiley - smiley

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 12.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Or even as YOU do!!

    Groan. smiley - doh

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Lilians-Girl (U14561766) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    "You see, we were taught Jesus was about 33.5 when he was crucified - which if correct, means he was born around October, not December, given that he was executed at Easter. So where did 25th December come from?."


    The Romans had a lots of festivals near the end of December including Saturnalia which was a week long wild party. Passing the shortest day means the forces of darkness have been defeated which is well worth a celebration.

    When the Christians turned up they couldn't stamp out many pagan customs so they took them over and renamed them. Hence we get Christmas on 25th December which is almost certainly not the correct date.

    The Spring fertility festivals (May -poles and May queens etc) became Easter - the very name is a give away. 
    I think you are very much off topic! smiley - doh

    I am ducking now Rosemary. I think we're on a hiding to nothing here!

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    "You see, we were taught Jesus was about 33.5 when he was crucified - which if correct, means he was born around October, not December, given that he was executed at Easter. So where did 25th December come from?."


    The Romans had a lots of festivals near the end of December including Saturnalia which was a week long wild party. Passing the shortest day means the forces of darkness have been defeated which is well worth a celebration.

    When the Christians turned up they couldn't stamp out many pagan customs so they took them over and renamed them. Hence we get Christmas on 25th December which is almost certainly not the correct date.

    The Spring fertility festivals (May -poles and May queens etc) became Easter - the very name is a give away. 

    Can we stick to the topic of Poppies at the BBC please?

    Thanks!

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Lilians-Girl (U14561766) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Whoops, sorry Peta, I wasn't taking over your job! smiley - blush

    ......3 minutes.........

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 29th October 2012


    Feel free Lillians-Girl! smiley - biggrin

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by altup (U15315707) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    To Peta

    The BBC have got a policy for when to wear poppies? Why? So much for individual choice.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 29th October 2012



    It's a guideline about 'Poppy Season' = when it might be appropriate to start and stop without people posting to say, 'why did they stop too early... '

    Do you think that people should be allowed to wear poppies in August if they want to altup?

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by altup (U15315707) on Monday, 29th October 2012



    It's a guideline about 'Poppy Season' = when it might be appropriate to start and stop without people posting to say, 'why did they stop too early... '  

    So you worry about stupid people complaining about stupid things

    Do you think that people should be allowed to wear poppies in August if they want to altup? 

    Do you really need a specific rule to stop people behaving inappropriately? On that basis if there isn't a rule to say you should wear clothes people are allowed to present the news naked

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by altup (U15315707) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Personal view, feel free to disagree, is that celebrating an occasion too early, lessens it, and rather than being more respectful, it lessens the impact of the chosen day.

    So, personally, I'd like to see people not wearing poppies more than a week before the 11th November.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by DelusionsOfAdequacy (U15449583) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    I agree. For goodness' sake, live and let live. This obsession of 'they're paid', 'it's our money', 'they earn enough', 'they should pay' comes up over and over again in every discussion, whether relevant to it or not. Idem the accusation, often unsubstantiated by proof, that 'they' are getting something for nothing.

    BBC presenters, comperes, etc, would be abused if they wore a poppy. They'd be abused if they didn't. If they didn't pay for them there'd be an outcry. If they do, there'll always be someone who'll claim they should pay more.

    All off us, on screen and off, have a choice to buy and wear a poppy, or not. Can't we for heaven's sake leave it at that, just for once? 
    smiley - ok

    I couldn't agree more. I'll come and hide with you.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 4.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Lilians-Girl (U14561766) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Please don't mention BL poppies in the same sentence as Savile. smiley - sadface

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 47.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by JPDavey (U15482847) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    I'm delighted that one of the participants in this discussion has mentioned WHITE POPPIES for PEACE.

    Isn't it about time that BBC presenters (indeed all public figures) are given the option to wear the WHITE POPPY for PEACE?.

    I tend to wear both the red poppy to support the British Legion & show respect for the servicemen who died AND the WHITE POPPY for PEACE to show my INVOLVEMENT IN WORKING FOR PEACE & my support for the invaluable work of the Peace Pledge Union.
    I am astonished at how controversial the wearing of the WHITE POPPY is proving to be. However, when people pass comment, I welcome the opportunity to explain the history of the Peace Pledge Union & the nature & value of their work today.

    Report message50

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