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"Next time..." spoilers

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    Why does the BBC spoil every drama series by concluding each episode with a preview of the following one? Does the concept of "cliff-hanger" mean nothing to today's producers? Do they think it makes them look smart to use every fashionable production gimmick, no matter how inappropriate?

    The point of a mystery drama is to keep the audience on the edge of their seats, to surprise them with unexpected twists in the plot and to leave them enjoying the anticipation of what may happen next. Ploughing straight into a "Next time..." preview demonstrates a lamentable failure to understand the genre and a self-indulgent lack of respect for the viewer.

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  • Message 2

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    Posted by grannycool (U14401044) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    I totally agree with you Peakeen, thank you for putting into words what I have frequently thought.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by SAB888 (U14777346) ** on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    Well i totally agree Peakeen, they are spoilers and nothing else.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Piltdown Man (U1022939) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    Its done with everything now; the news...coming up later. Documentaries you get the coming up in the programme and then in a series you get at the end of the programme coming up next time.

    It is unnecessary and I wonder why every channel decides to suddenly follow a trend a do this to all their programmes; one you could understand but they all do it now.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by fuzzysquirrel (U15305803) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    Its done with everything now; the news...coming up later. Documentaries you get the coming up in the programme and then in a series you get at the end of the programme coming up next time.

    It is unnecessary and I wonder why every channel decides to suddenly follow a trend a do this to all their programmes; one you could understand but they all do it now. 
    PLEASE, PLEASE, stop doing this!!!

    It is annoying in the extreme.

    However, such as loud background music, shrinking credits, wobbly camera angles and the old bugbear of contstant repeats will ............................

    ANYONE AT THE BBC ACTUALLY LISTEN OR MORE TO THE POINT DO ANYTHING ABOUT IT????????

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by macnightowl (U8303134) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    Yes, I agree with you also.

    I now watch anything that is a series that I'm hooked on with the remote in my hand for the last few minutes and directly the episode has ended I switch to any other channel in order to not hear or see what is going to happen next week.

    It's a real pain in the butt and in the past I've been caught out and felt bitterly disappointed that the next episode has been somewhat spoiled by the stupid "next time" trailer.

    smiley - grr smiley - steam smiley - grr smiley - steam smiley - grr smiley - steam smiley - grr smiley - steam

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by victoria (U3941046) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    it is as annoying as being shown the end page of a book .... why on earth do they do this ?
    also the tv mags all tell us in detail what is going to happen in next weeks soaps..
    one time it was kept a secret ...

    but as has been said , does anyone in charge ever take any notice of complaints on this board ?

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    It's done simply to eat up broadcasting time and save costs.



    They couldn't give a toss about the viewers !

    30 minute programmes contain about 14 minutes of original content. Just try watching Portillo on those train trips .... ghastly waste of broadcast time.

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    ...Ploughing straight into a "Next time..." preview demonstrates [...] a self-indulgent lack of respect for the viewer.  Not just a lack of respect to the viewers.

    The writers have carefully crafted a script which builds to a climax at the end of each episode, with the plot on a knife-edge and the viewer trying to anticipate what happens next.

    Then you tell them.

    The writers must hate these spoilers even more than the viewers, seeing their work devalued by gimmicky producers.

    Next time...
    I'll be asking if anyone actually thinks these previews are a good thing.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Mary Chambers (U2135388) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    It doesn't bother me at all. I quite like to know what's coming up. It gives me a clue about whether or not it will be worth watching!

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Alex (U1588844) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    Of course, we are now starting to get the "Previously...." bit at the beginning of shows. Very American (and therefore stupid) but it will be the next thing to become mainstream here. It adds absolutely no value to the show. At least spoilers may ensure some people watch the next episode (although I'd like to know if this has been tested). But "previously" serves no purpose. People are already watching. Paul Sherratt (no. 9) is right - it is just done to fill time so they don't have to pay for extra filming of content to fill the space.

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Lionwillow70 (U14638292) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    I totally agree....I dive for the remote to navigate away from these spoilers....I'm not so worried about the "previously" as this can help...and, one more go, stop squishing the credits!!!!

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Piltdown Man (U1022939) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    It doesn't bother me at all. I quite like to know what's coming up. It gives me a clue about whether or not it will be worth watching!  Surely, its up to you to decide whether it's worth watching or not? I am sure we had the sense to figure out whether something was worth watching before they started telling us what was coming up next (and as far as I can tell we all sill have the ability to do it).

    Again and again there are things introduced and again and again so many complain about it but we are just told "from our surveys we find lots of people like it"

    Who are these mysterious people that have actually seen and taken part in a survey to suggest we all like the the major sourse of complaints in tv programmes

    Loud background music, squashed tv credits, constantly changing camera angles, the whoosing sound effect that seems to be the norm these days, the coming up next week and what is coming up this week in the programme.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    I've recently been watching re-runs of "Restoration Roadshow" and that covered all the variations - interminable cuts between items, shots from previous and forthcoming episodes all mixed up so that at times you not even syre which episode you are viewing!

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by fox_at_moonlight (U15160069) on Sunday, 7th October 2012

    I agree with everything said on this thread and am with macnightowl in that the remote is immediately to hand to switch channels or switch off. I can make up my *own* mind, from what I've just seen, as to whether I'll watch another episode.

    There have been so many programmes ending with the potential to spoil that I've lost count. Add to this the constant trailing of programmes beforehand and I often wonder why I bother watching at all as most of the story has been told.

    Will those at the BBC take notice .... I won't hold my breath.

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Hi Mary,

    " Next week in 'Curlew River ' Madwoman persuades The Ferryman to give her passage in the search for her child, who sadly has already passed away "

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Reservoir Hamster (U14288323) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Previously on Reservoir Hamster posts:

    "I don't like whooshing noises."

    Coming up later in this post Reservoir Hamster builds on his devastating critique of whooshing noises and lets it be known what his true opinion of Next Time Spoilers actually is. The Hamster is not known for pulling his punches and his views are worth waiting for. Expect more of the trenchant opinions he has expressed in the past about whooshing noises and a host of other annoying things from the BBC.

    So, without further ado, and with your permission, ladies and gentlemen of the messageboards, let's hear from Reservoir Hamster what it is that he actually thinks about Next Time Spoilers:

    "Well, I don't actually like them."

    Next time the Hamster will be opining on loud background music. Stay glued to these messageboards to find out what this inveterate poster actually thinks about the practice. Here is a taster:

    "I don't think I like loud background music very much."

    Don't forget to check the board next week to hear the Hamster elaborate on his eccentric viewpoint.

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by eviled2 (U14446578) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Very American (and therefore stupid)...  smiley - laugh

    (Agree with the OP btw)

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Ceiderduck (U14588518) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    I agree with everything said on this thread and am with macnightowl in that the remote is immediately to hand to switch channels or switch off. I can make up my *own* mind, from what I've just seen, as to whether I'll watch another episode.
     


    Same here. Hateful practice. Though I do know of one regular poster who considers them perfectly acceptable, as they do with ANY other annoying BBC practice. G'wan, guess who! smiley - steam

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    It doesn't bother me at all. I quite like to know what's coming up. It gives me a clue about whether or not it will be worth watching!  I can see that on the Antiques Roadshow, for instance, something like "Next time we'll be examining a tallboy and a pair of antique knockers in Bath" may well whet the appetite.

    What I really had in mind, though, was a drama series like Spooks or now Hunted where clips from the following episode act as an anticlimax, destroying any feeling of suspense and anticipation crafted by the scriptwriter to end of the previous one.

    I was going to mention Bletchley Circle when I realised it was on ITV. It's got to be said that it's not just a BBC fad!

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    You people are obviously watching the wrong channel and the wrong programmes. The BBC have found that people of low IQ watch BBC1 (they call it 'the main channel') and they don't like being left not knowing what happens. Also they tend to forget what they watched very quickly so anything that gets them to watch, or might possibly do so, is leapt upon.

    Since Freeview became well known and used, the various channels have become more oriented to their target audiences and the target audience for BBC1 is more elderly, traditional values and rather poorly educated. You people, by your coimments are wanting and expecting BBC1 to be as it always was, decent quality mainstream TV with a mix of drama, documentaries and so on.

    Phone up your local authority, ask them if you can visit one of their old folks homes. Go and have a look around. They have a TV lounge and it is occupied by the inmates, permanently watching BBC1 'because other channels have adverts and try to educate you and I just want entertainment but not suspense', Imagine dying and so never knowing what hjappened next.

    On Sky Arts they are currently showing a regular programme with the aim of broadcasting every single piece of music written by J. S. Bach. There is no commentary, no introduction, a caption introduces each piece.

    So if you want cartoons there are some channels. Porn? Fine, there is porn. Arts, yes plenty. But you have to change channels , not turn things back to how they used to be. But you won't hear so on the BBC because you might start wondering about whether the licence fee of the old days is at all appropriate, and come to think that some changes should be made.

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  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) ** on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Though I do know of one regular poster who considers them perfectly acceptable 
    I'm another who doesn't mind them. I mostly see them on Doctor Who, where they don't really give that much away (it'd be quite hard to give away 45 minutes of often quite frenetic story in 15 seconds anyway), and the way they drop teasers for the next episode pretty much seems like part of the show's structure now.

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  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    I'm another who doesn't mind them... they don't really give that much away...seems like part of the show's structure now.  So, out of about 20 replies, 90% hate being told what's going to happen next, 5% aren't bothered and 5% don't mind because (in their opinion) they don't really give much away (you're not paying attention!), and they've got used to them.

    Next time I'll be asking if the BBC considers this to be a statistically significant endorsement of their current policy.





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  • Message 24

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    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) ** on Monday, 8th October 2012

    (you're not paying attention!), 
    Being told I pay too little attention to Doctor Who is a novel experience.

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  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    It doesn't bother me at all. I quite like to know what's coming up. It gives me a clue about whether or not it will be worth watching!  I agree, I don't mind them.

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  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    I don't mind them either, in fact quite like them. They never give away the end of the story, they just show how the story will progress, just to keep people interested. So I see them from a completely different angle to the OP.

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  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Mary Chambers (U2135388) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Hi Mary,

    " Next week in 'Curlew River ' Madwoman persuades The Ferryman to give her passage in the search for her child, who sadly has already passed away " 
    smiley - smiley
    I don't often come across people who chat about Curlew River on this board! As it happens I did know what happened before I saw it, having been trained from childhood to read programme notes and synopses.

    I also know what happens in Peter Grimes, La Traviata, Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet. Does it spoil them? No.

    Admittedly Downton Abbey isn't quite in the same category.

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  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Helen (U15038813) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    I agree I hate it. I remember when they did the 2 part finale of doctor series 4 of the new run and they didn't have what happens next and it was much better for it as it left people to speculate.

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Prophet Tenebrae (U5995226) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    It's a very irritating trend that pads out episode times. Personally, I just switch off in disgust and contempt and quietly seethe at the world as I drink a medicinal G&T.

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  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by JanH (U14017596) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    So, out of about 20 replies, 90% hate being told what's going to happen next, 5% aren't bothered and 5% don't mind because (in their opinion) they don't really give much away (you're not paying attention!), and they've got used to them.

    Next time I'll be asking if the BBC considers this to be a statistically significant endorsement of their current policy. 


    I am part of the 90% so please ask them.

    If time has to be filled with something make it a quick synopsis of what happened previously at least that is helpful to those who missed a previous episode of the drama.

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  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    You people are obviously watching the wrong channel and the wrong programmes. The BBC have found that people of low IQ watch BBC1 (they call it 'the main channel') and they don't like being left not knowing what happens. Also they tend to forget what they watched very quickly so anything that gets them to watch, or might possibly do so, is leapt upon.

    Since Freeview became well known and used, the various channels have become more oriented to their target audiences and the target audience for BBC1 is more elderly, traditional values and rather poorly educated. You people, by your coimments are wanting and expecting BBC1 to be as it always was, decent quality mainstream TV with a mix of drama, documentaries and so on.

    Phone up your local authority, ask them if you can visit one of their old folks homes. Go and have a look around. They have a TV lounge and it is occupied by the inmates, permanently watching BBC1 'because other channels have adverts and try to educate you and I just want entertainment but not suspense', Imagine dying and so never knowing what hjappened next.

    On Sky Arts they are currently showing a regular programme with the aim of broadcasting every single piece of music written by J. S. Bach. There is no commentary, no introduction, a caption introduces each piece.

    So if you want cartoons there are some channels. Porn? Fine, there is porn. Arts, yes plenty. But you have to change channels , not turn things back to how they used to be. But you won't hear so on the BBC because you might start wondering about whether the licence fee of the old days is at all appropriate, and come to think that some changes should be made. 
    I think the "coiments" have nothing to do with any expectation of "decent quality mainstream TV", although I don't see what the problem is in having such aspirations. My issues are that I enjoy having the plot of a drama, or the course of a factual programme, unfold before my eyes. I do not require the BBC to show me what is coming up in the next portion of the programme in order to maintain my interest. If they've done their job properly I will continue to watch.
    Now you will have your own opinion but to suggest that because I disagree I am of a low IQ is offensive, as is your characterisation of elderly people in an "old folks home".

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  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Tuesday, 9th October 2012

    I don't mind them either, in fact quite like them...  So the most enthusiastic endorsement of spoilers is "quite like", compared to the disgust, contempt and desire to hit the bottle whilst simultaneously searching under the cushion for the remote control expressed by their detractors.

    I take Mary Chambers' point about Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet - but imagine being in the audience at the Globe for the very first performance with no idea how the story would unfold!

    As for Johnbee's On Sky Arts they are currently showing a regular programme with the aim of broadcasting every single piece of music written by J. S. Bach. There is no commentary, no introduction, a caption introduces each piece.  Previously: BWV808
    Next time: BWV810

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  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) ** on Tuesday, 9th October 2012

    imagine being in the audience at the Globe for the very first performance with no idea how the story would unfold! 
    If you don't know the rough outline of Romeo and Juliet, the opening speech of the play gives you exactly that -- and the fact that both plays have "Tragedy" in their full title may also give you a clue.

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  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Tuesday, 9th October 2012

    If you don't know the rough outline of Romeo and Juliet, the opening speech of the play gives you exactly that -- and the fact that both plays have "Tragedy" in their full title may also give you a clue.  Which is precisely what the writer intended - and this guy knew what he was doing!

    But I wonder if he'd have approved of the producer throwing in little snippets of Act 2 and Act 3 at the end of Act 1.

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Tuesday, 9th October 2012

    they just show how the story will progress, just to keep people interested. 

    So what you are saying is that the majority of viewers have to suffer because a few muppets can't make up their mind whether they will bother to watch next week.Anybody who has enjoyed what they have just watched will tune in next week and those that didn't like it won't.We don't need these teasers/spoilers

    It's the same with trailers for Eastenders.They show some people shouting(which I gather is the norm for this programme) and we're expected to believe that their are hoards of viewers thinking "Oh that looks good! I might start to watch that,even though it's been running for 27 years and I've never seen a single spisode"

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  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Tuesday, 9th October 2012

    they just show how the story will progress, just to keep people interested. 

    So what you are saying is that the majority of viewers have to suffer because a few muppets can't make up their mind whether they will bother to watch next week 


    No, not at all. I'm only speaking for myself by saying I don't mind them and that they don't, as has been said, give away the end of the story. I don't appreciated being called a muppet either and hope you will apologise for that.

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  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Wednesday, 10th October 2012

    This week's Monroe is a case in point. (Yes, I know it's on ITV. I mention it only because I was a bit slow on the remote and caught a few seconds of the spoiler.)

    Monroe has to sack one of his two trainees, but which one? The episode ends. We go straight into a next-time clip of one of the trainees looking really pleased because he's got the residency. How stupid is that?

    If I'm intrigued by the ending of one episode I'll watch the next but if I'm told what's going to happen I may not bother watching - it becomes almost like watching a repeat.

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  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Wednesday, 10th October 2012

    I don't appreciated being called a muppet either and hope you will apologise for that. 

    I wasn't specifically referrng to you Dover Soul it was a general comment.I'm sorry you assumed that I meant you.
    The fact is that the powers that be who run televison think we are all a bit thick and unable to decide for ourselves what we would enjoy watching

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  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Wednesday, 10th October 2012

    < Now you will have your own opinion but to suggest that because I disagree I am of a low IQ is offensive, as is your characterisation of elderly people in an "old folks home >

    Why is it offensive to say a person is of low IQ, or elderly? More than half the population is of below average IQ, and loads of people are getting on a bit. Such people have a tendency to watch BBC1 TV. They are just facts.

    If you like watching BBC1 TV and like being told what is coming up next and you like seeing bits of the next programme, that is fine with me. On my TV there are quite a few channels which show nothing but pop music videos the whle time. I suppose they are watched mostly by teenagers with very short attention spans.

    The other night I watched and enjoyed on PBS a programme about Richard Nixon. It was just a load of boring old black and white newsreel to many people, and I also watched a programme about the development of modern art which was a repeat of an old programme that nobody watched the fisrt time it was shown as it was pretentious crap, I liked it.

    So there are plenty of channels - I was saying that it is no good moaning that the one you are watching isn't suitable for you, those days are gone

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  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by minibones (U14961554) on Wednesday, 10th October 2012

    < Now you will have your own opinion but to suggest that because I disagree I am of a low IQ is offensive, as is your characterisation of elderly people in an "old folks home >

    Why is it offensive to say a person is of low IQ, or elderly? More than half the population is of below average IQ, and loads of people are getting on a bit. Such people have a tendency to watch BBC1 TV. They are just facts.

    If you like watching BBC1 TV and like being told what is coming up next and you like seeing bits of the next programme, that is fine with me. On my TV there are quite a few channels which show nothing but pop music videos the whle time. I suppose they are watched mostly by teenagers with very short attention spans.

    The other night I watched and enjoyed on PBS a programme about Richard Nixon. It was just a load of boring old black and white newsreel to many people, and I also watched a programme about the development of modern art which was a repeat of an old programme that nobody watched the fisrt time it was shown as it was pretentious crap, I liked it.

    So there are plenty of channels - I was saying that it is no good moaning that the one you are watching isn't suitable for you, those days are gone 
    It's offensive because you intended it to be so.

    It is a fact that some posters are insufferable idiots - it's just not a fact relevant to the discussion.

    It doesn't matter what other channels show.

    The complaint is/was that the increasing prevalence of previewing significant portions of forthcoming programmes and/or forthcoming segments of programmes was spoiling the viewing experience for a number of posters.

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  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Wednesday, 10th October 2012

    You're taking Johnbee's remarks a bit too literally, emigrecimla. He was only having a satirical poke at the BBC's condescending, "we know best" attitude to its audience rather than being offensive to you personally or care home clients in general (who, in my experience, sit watching Jeremy Kyle somewhere on ITV provoking arguments between sullen teenagers).

    Let's get back to "next time..". It would be good if people posted examples of their most irritating spoiler.

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  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Last night we had the ultimate demonstration of when not to do "next time".

    The whole point of The Secret of Crickley Hall is seeing the drama unfold gradually, piece by piece, from one shock climax to the next, as the writer intended. Anticipating what might occur next is an integral part of the genre.

    It is an insult to the craft of the writers and to the intelligence of the viewers to end the first episode with a preview of the second.

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  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Absolutely agree.

    They have just done it on R4 continuing drama as well. Drat them.

    I don't mind them saying something like 'make sure to catch next week to find out what happens to ???? and show a still of the main promo'

    |far from keeping me hanging on, it is more likely to make me turn off if they give away too much.

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  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Just read a few more posts.

    The clear issue here is to differentiate between 'trailing' what is coming next and 'spoiling' the tension usually quite cleverly built up and times so as to take each episode to 'what happens next' climax.

    When they tell you and especially show you far too much they actually remove what they just spent 58 minutes truing to do. It's lazy and it's not clever.

    I implore programme makers and broadcasters to review trailers adn remove spoilers. It should be possible.

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  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Jan-Ann (U14322193) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Last night we had the ultimate demonstration of when not to do "next time".

    The whole point of The Secret of Crickley Hall is seeing the drama unfold gradually, piece by piece, from one shock climax to the next, as the writer intended. Anticipating what might occur next is an integral part of the genre.

    It is an insult to the craft of the writers and to the intelligence of the viewers to end the first episode with a preview of the second. 
    Absolutely.

    A drama should be tense; a good drama should try to keep you on the edge of your seat, eager to know what happens next and so you will watch the next episode. To be given a good description of next time makes you less likely to want to see the programme so this practice defeats the object.

    Said previously, it's like being shown Hamilton's overtaking move in the F1 at the beginning of the race. Okay, you wouldn't have been told he won, but it would have taken away the reason to hang on to my hair while they were racing. (I don't like him. Come on Vettel.)

    Crickley Hall eh? I've recorded that so I'll be ready with the remote to mute/turn over at the end.

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  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Scalywitch (U2366427) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Just like to add my displeaasure at the SPOILERS also, Hunted is a prime example, needle going in the eye, is she dead, oh my , but no shes not as there she is in the next episode!!! Poisoned she will be next, but oh no she is fine as there she is in the next episode right as rain PLEASE stop spoiling the plot.

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  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by olicana_man (U14156932) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Agree, don't do it.

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  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by manathu (U4905543) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    It really really annoys me. All the channels are doing this. Please stop

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  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by PaulHammond (U5000908) on Monday, 19th November 2012

    Who are these mysterious people that have actually seen and taken part in a survey to suggest we all like the the major sourse of complaints in tv programmes 

    Sorry Piltdown, but you have just rubbished the viewpoint of someone who said precisely that, that she actually likes the "Next on..." bits and finds them useful. So if you're going to just ignore anyone who actually likes them, should we really take you seriously when you attempt to speak on everyone else's behalf - even those who you have just finished speaking over before going on to suggest that no-one disagrees with you about this...

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  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peakeen (U15050775) on Wednesday, 28th November 2012

    And it's not just mystery dramas like Hunted or Crickley Hall.

    Last Tango In Halifax is among the many programmes spoiled by this gimmick which seems to be detested by the vast majority of viewers.

    The irony is, of course, that many viewers grab the remote from underneath the cat and switch to another channel - any other channel - just to avoid being told what is going to happen in the middle of next week's episode. Far from attracting viewers, the BBC is turning us off!

    In addition genuine trailers for similar programmes are often shown after the credits, and we miss these too.

    Lose, lose for the BBC!

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