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Getting On series 3

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 5th October 2012

    I'm delighted to see the return of this dark comedy, written by and starring Jo Brand, Joanna Scanlan and Vicki Pepperdine:

    www.radiotimes.com/e...

    Jo Brand is a bit marmite, and there was criticism before of the unsteady camerawork introduced in places to simulate a fly-on-the-wall documentary, but I loved it. So did my daughter who is in the NHS.

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  • Message 2

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    Posted by man-in-the-moon (U3655413) on Thursday, 11th October 2012

    Looking forward to this.One of the best comedy series of recent years.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Thursday, 11th October 2012

    There's a couple of clips from series 3 up now - great one about the hi-tech bed, under 'Clips' - 'The Bed':

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

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  • Message 4

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    Posted by Maria (U14341913) on Thursday, 11th October 2012


    Jo Brand is talking about it on The One Show.

    Great to see it back!

    Oh dear, they're making a US version......Won't be as good as ours!

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  • Message 5

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 15th October 2012


    Head's up for Wednesday

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Next on
    SERIES 3

    Episode 1
    1/6 It's a new hospital and a new ward, but the same old problems for Kim, Pippa and Den.

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  • Message 6

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    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Wednesday, 17th October 2012


    Head's up for Wednesday

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Next on
    SERIES 3

    Episode 1
    1/6 It's a new hospital and a new ward, but the same old problems for Kim, Pippa and Den.  
    I've set my box to record it tonight!

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  • Message 7

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    Posted by WinterLily (U1661031) on Wednesday, 17th October 2012

    I love this programme and will look forward to this series.

    As an NHS nurse it has me howling with laughter and in many ways it really is spot on!

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  • Message 8

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    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) on Wednesday, 17th October 2012

    For any reluctant to click any of the posed links it is on ....

    Today
    10pm - 10:30pm
    BBC4

    Repeat
    Tomorrow
    1:15am
    BBC4

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  • Message 9

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    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) ** on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    Oh this is so good-

    Everything about it so spot on-the casting is brilliant ,the writing tight.and the acting makes you feel it is a documentary.

    Not laugh out loud -but then it is not meant to be.

    Roll on next week .

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  • Message 10

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    Posted by Minnies_Dad (U1961224) on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    and there was criticism before of the unsteady camerawork introduced in places to simulate a fly-on-the-wall documentary, 

    I too was looking forward to the return of this series. The subtle acting, sensitive writing and understated comedy by the three leads, set it apart from the general BBC comedy output.

    But the previous series did suffer from a director determined to make a contribution by employing the wobblecam. This is now verging on the desperate.

    At times the actor on screen had a problem even staying in frame. The camera lurched around so much that on occasions I looked away rather than risk nausea. I defeats me why anyone would think this an intelligent way to film a scene.

    The best directors don’t let their contribution get in the way of the script and the acting. The viewers cannot pay proper attention to actors and dialogue if they are being distracted by their attempts to focus on the screen!

    Still, I expect it’s all been shot now - and in the same fashion. So the director will share the show’s plaudits, despite them actually being garnered by the three leads for their writing and acting.

    Another difference from the previous series, I thought, was that the whispered conversations and throwaway asides, were sometimes too whispered and thrown away. This is yet another BBC affectation, caught from the Drama dept. A pity as they were often at the heart of a joke.

    Maybe I’ll try watching the next one with the subtitles on.


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  • Message 11

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    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    the whispered conversations and throwaway asides, were sometimes too whispered and thrown away.  

    I agree with this. I felt I was probably missing some amusing lines because some of the conversations were so difficult to hear.

    I had no problem with the hand-held camera "cinema vérité" technique though. smiley - smiley

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  • Message 12

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    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    Great start - just as good as ever.

    I will agree though that some of the lines were difficult to make out.

    I like that they've moved the characters on a bit - it is a couple of years since the previous series. Pippa is divorced, Den is reconciled, Hilary is now a Business Consultant - are Kim's circumstances still the same?

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  • Message 13

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    Posted by Mike A (U14505540) on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    The funniest and also most heartbreaking show on tv. It's wonderful, please keep it up!

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  • Message 14

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    Posted by fortrosian (U2001738) on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    Once again it was spot on, loved the sheets being given away at the end, and Kim staying behind because her friend was in trouble. I should imagine lots have people have done that...

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  • Message 15

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    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Thursday, 18th October 2012

    I thought that the very first series of the dark comedy / drama, Getting On, was both incredibly fresh and rather innovative.

    Having now watched the first episode in series three I personally find it's becoming a bit all too predictable, and, as a consequence, found it to be only mildly amusing.

    I think that the writing team of Jo Brand, Vicki Pepperdine and Joanna Scanlan may be gradually running out of ideas. Having said that, though, it's still worth watching compared to all the other dross currently on television at the moment.

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  • Message 16

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    Posted by DaveA (U14937949) on Friday, 19th October 2012

    The funniest and also most heartbreaking show on tv. It's wonderful, please keep it up!
     
    It's a strange thing, I sometimes watch this comedy and never laugh at all, yet I can't wait for the next offering.
    That said, the scene with the bed was very funny, as was the fate of the consultant's Egyptian cotton sheets.
    The real appeal for me is in the excellent writing and the totally believeable characters and situations. It's a gem.

    Dave A (no relation)

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  • Message 17

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    Posted by peteleeds (U15467543) on Friday, 19th October 2012

    first time i've come across this series as i'm not a regular bbc4 viewer, thought it was well written and amazingly acted but i wouldn't class it as a comedy

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  • Message 18

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    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Friday, 19th October 2012

    "Leicester...oh dear."

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  • Message 19

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    Posted by Bidie-In (U2747062) on Friday, 19th October 2012

    Wonderful series - funny, ironic and sometimes so very touching and sad.

    Reading Jo's autobiography Look Back In Hunger - cannot wait to reach her real life nursing experiences. smiley - nurse

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  • Message 20

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    Posted by miss-nomer (U11095887) on Friday, 19th October 2012

    Not for those who like "stand up, in your face humour", but I love it, & record each episode so that I shan't miss it.

    I find myself riveted to the screen, but I do have the same criticism as above, some of it is too quiet to understand. Please B.B.C. put it right.

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  • Message 21

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    Posted by WinterLily (U1661031) on Friday, 19th October 2012

    Having read some of the previous comments I watched this on iPlayer with subtitles

    So funny and I identify with so many things....the 'all singing, all dancing bed, but had no training' scenario was hilarious.

    The side room complete with unconscious patient doubling as sister's office........didn't work for me as just a bit too silly.

    The ward round with the electronic equipment malfunctioning and then simply relying on the good old paper copies.....had me sniggering in recognition.

    The consultant attempting to rope everyone in with her 'vag-at' research project....so funny!

    And finally, Kim giving up her own time to talk to a troubled friend and colleague at the end of a very long day.....so typical of nurses and lovely too.....

    Oh! almost forgot - the diversity cupcakes!!!!

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  • Message 22

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    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) on Wednesday, 24th October 2012

    Episode 2 in a moment.

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  • Message 23

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    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Thursday, 25th October 2012

    Anyone see it last night? I have to say, it's about as black as a black comedy can get before it really isn't a comedy any more. Still very good, but I'm not altogether sure what genre it is...if it is one at all.

    That Hilary character is a work of genius. He's so goddamned awful, you just want to poke him in the eye...except you don't - or at least, I don't. He's so awful, but at the same time so tragic - just seeing those sad, piggy little eyes mounted like cloves in that great ham of a head...you get the feeling that on some fundamental level beyond his everyday ken, he does actually understand *just how awful he is*. How sad is that?

    I did enjoy the bits where Doris was going up....and down....and up....and down....

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  • Message 24

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    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Thursday, 25th October 2012

    I did enjoy the bits where Doris was going up....and down....and up....and down.... 

    Me too - that was very amusing, and the whole episode even better than the first I thought.

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  • Message 25

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    Posted by Bidie-In (U2747062) on Thursday, 25th October 2012

    Another great episode. I just KNEW the newly pregnant sister was going to milk it for all the was worth from day 1.

    I have worked with women liked that. smiley - steam

    The shock on the face of the doctor and the nurse when Kim suggested they could share accommodation was priceless.....smiley - laugh

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  • Message 26

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    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Thursday, 25th October 2012

    I notice that this was directed by Sue Tully who recently has directed episodes of Good Cop and The Paradise. Versatile.

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  • Message 27

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 26th October 2012


    I haven't watched, but having read this thread I'll give it a go... sounds intriguing!

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  • Message 28

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    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    And now it the time to do so.

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  • Message 29

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    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Just loved the fact that the cleaner had a bucket of law degrees etc. giving Pippa advice on the financial ins and outs.

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  • Message 30

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    Posted by IzzyR (U6660949) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    I've already pre-ordered the dvd of series 3. This is right up my street. It is so well cast. I hope there will be a series 4.

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  • Message 31

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    Posted by fortrosian (U2001738) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    Just loved the fact that the cleaner had a bucket of law degrees etc. giving Pippa advice on the financial ins and outs.   I also liked the way Kim interacted with Stephen, and taking him out for fresh air so he could help her with her assignment.

    I also felt that the constant turning off of equipment was bound to result in catastrophe at some point...

    Once again, a great episode

    smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 32

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    Posted by Bidie-In (U2747062) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    The idea that important information will be "cascaded".

    A bit like wee......

    Where I worked, the duty of passing info along ended up with those who never made eye contact in the corridors, let alone spoke to the staff......smiley - doh

    We had to learn things by listening at doors. smiley - laugh

    Great series, funny, warm. annoying and sad in equal measures. The domestic assistant giving legal advice was classic. I expect Pippa will be bothering him on a daily basis from now on.

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  • Message 33

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    Posted by Nell Desperandum (U14336053) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    The idea that important information will be "cascaded".

    A bit like wee......

    Where I worked, the duty of passing info along ended up with those who never made eye contact in the corridors, let alone spoke to the staff......smiley - doh

    We had to learn things by listening at doors. smiley - laugh

    Great series, funny, warm. annoying and sad in equal measures. The domestic assistant giving legal advice was classic. I expect Pippa will be bothering him on a daily basis from now on. 
    Absolutely brilliant. Love it. Where I worked we had 'cascading' too, with similar results. I'm getting the DVD as it's well worth repeat viewing to catch the little details.

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  • Message 34

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    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Wednesday, 7th November 2012

    I watched the first episode of 'Getting On' on the IPlayer last night and the camerawork drove me mad...the camera kept going out of focus, zooming in zooming out and jumping about all over the place.

    The programme itself is very good..but it makes me feel seasick !!

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  • Message 35

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    Posted by Minnies_Dad (U1961224) on Wednesday, 7th November 2012

    I watched the first episode of 'Getting On' on the IPlayer last night and the camerawork drove me mad...the camera kept going out of focus, zooming in zooming out and jumping about all over the place.  

    This has become something of a feature of many BBC productions. Since only the half witted would think it a clever idea to distract from what the paid actors are actually doing and saying in front of the camera, I suggest other reasons.

    For example, the use of inexperienced (ie cheap) camera operators. Or possibly the fact that someone has stolen the BBC’s tripod and budgetary restraints preclude the purchase of a new one.


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  • Message 36

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    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Wednesday, 7th November 2012

    I watched the first episode of 'Getting On' on the IPlayer last night and the camerawork drove me mad...the camera kept going out of focus, zooming in zooming out and jumping about all over the place.  

    This has become something of a feature of many BBC productions. Since only the half witted would think it a clever idea to distract from what the paid actors are actually doing and saying in front of the camera, I suggest other reasons.

    For example, the use of inexperienced (ie cheap) camera operators. Or possibly the fact that someone has stolen the BBC’s tripod and budgetary restraints preclude the purchase of a new one.


     
    I quote from Wikipedia:

    Cinéma vérité . . . . . "truthful cinema") is a style of documentary filmmaking, combining naturalistic techniques with stylized cinematic devices of editing and camerawork, staged set-ups, and the use of the camera to provoke subjects. It is also known for taking a provocative stance toward its topics.  

    The use of hand-held cameras to convey greater immediacy to films dates from the early 1960's.

    It's about time people got used to it! smiley - smiley

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  • Message 37

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    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Wednesday, 7th November 2012

    I watched the first episode of 'Getting On' on the IPlayer last night and the camerawork drove me mad...the camera kept going out of focus, zooming in zooming out and jumping about all over the place.  

    This has become something of a feature of many BBC productions. Since only the half witted would think it a clever idea to distract from what the paid actors are actually doing and saying in front of the camera, I suggest other reasons.

    For example, the use of inexperienced (ie cheap) camera operators. Or possibly the fact that someone has stolen the BBC’s tripod and budgetary restraints preclude the purchase of a new one.


     
    I quote from Wikipedia:

    Cinéma vérité . . . . . "truthful cinema") is a style of documentary filmmaking, combining naturalistic techniques with stylized cinematic devices of editing and camerawork, staged set-ups, and the use of the camera to provoke subjects. It is also known for taking a provocative stance toward its topics.  

    The use of hand-held cameras to convey greater immediacy to films dates from the early 1960's.

    It's about time people got used to it! smiley - smiley 

    Not to this extent

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  • Message 38

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    Posted by Minnies_Dad (U1961224) on Thursday, 8th November 2012

    I quote from Wikipedia:

    Cinéma vérité . . . . . "truthful cinema") is a style of documentary filmmaking, combining naturalistic techniques with stylized cinematic devices of editing and camerawork, staged set-ups, and the use of the camera to provoke subjects. It is also known for taking a provocative stance toward its topics.  

    The use of hand-held cameras to convey greater immediacy to films dates from the early 1960's. 
     


    Arguably, even earlier than the 1960’s. But light, handheld cameras and portable sync sound recorders were developed for what became known as ‘documentaries’ in locations where there was little chance of setting up a camera or rehearsing a take, and to make the participants less conscious of the equipment. It was this feeling of naturalistic immediacy that ‘Cinéma vérité’ sought to reflect. The quote you’ve selected doesn’t suggest that it involved deliberate and exaggerated shakiness, erratic framing, focus pulls and whip-pans.

    On the contrary, makers of Cinéma vérité documentaries did their best to keep the viewers’ attention focused on the subject as hero. The slight shakycam effect was simply a by-product of the new technology.

    However, the effect was then aped by directors trying to add ‘naturalism’ to scripted drama. US TV was full of them - Hill Street Blues for example.

    ‘Getting On’ is simply the latest exaggerated manifestation of the tail that has been allowed to wag the dog! As soon as the viewer is distracted by the technique away from the content, then the production has gone seriously wrong.

    I’ve already mentioned before that, like others, I have found trying to watch the screen was sometimes verging on the nauseous. I can’t believe that the writers (in this case the cast) would agree that this was a suitable reward for their efforts while delivering well-crafted acting and dialogue.

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  • Message 39

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    Posted by DaveA (U14937949) on Thursday, 8th November 2012

    The use of hand-held cameras to convey greater immediacy to films dates from the early 1960's.

    It's about time people got used to it!  


    Or, it could be argued, it's time they realised that lots of people find it annoying and distracting and time that it was abandoned.

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  • Message 40

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    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Thursday, 8th November 2012

    Or, it could be argued, it's time they realised that lots of people find it annoying and distracting and time that it was abandoned.  

    The hand-held camera didn't bother me at all, in fact if someone had asked me about the series I wouldn't even have mentioned it. My one criticism is that some of the conversations are whispered and difficult to hear.

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  • Message 41

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    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Thursday, 8th November 2012

    The use of hand-held cameras to convey greater immediacy to films dates from the early 1960's.

    It's about time people got used to it!  


    Or, it could be argued, it's time they realised that lots of people find it annoying and distracting and time that it was abandoned. 


    It could. It could also be argued that people like to come on here and complain at length about stuff that bugs them inordinately (background music, compressed titles, hand-held camerawork) tho' in truth it bothers hardly anyone else.

    I would cheerfully bet a pound to a penny that if you polled all the viewers of Getting On as to how many are made to feel nauseous by the camerawork, the overwhelming response would be a polite: 'Sorry, but I've no idea what you're talking about.'

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  • Message 42

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    Posted by Minnies_Dad (U1961224) on Thursday, 8th November 2012

    My one criticism is that some of the conversations are whispered and difficult to hear.  

    Yes, I too have mentioned that before. So as an experiment, I watched the last programme with the sub titles on. One particular exchange between Den and Kim would have been pointless otherwise. It not only revealed new depths to the dialogue, it also distracted from the camera’s attack of St Vitus’ dance!

    The puzzle is that this is a problem that’s immediately obvious at the recording to the production team. What’s the point of crafting dialogue if it’s then rendered inaudible?

    Is it that no-one cares anymore?

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  • Message 43

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    Posted by DaveA (U14937949) on Friday, 9th November 2012

    I would cheerfully bet a pound to a penny that if you polled all the viewers of Getting On as to how many are made to feel nauseous by the camerawork, the overwhelming response would be a polite: 'Sorry, but I've no idea what you're talking about.' 

    Actually, I agree with you, Alan.
    Personally I don't think it matters, but some people are obviously upset by it and the series would not lose anything if the hand held camera approach was dropped.

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  • Message 44

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    Posted by Minnies_Dad (U1961224) on Friday, 9th November 2012

    It could also be argued that people like to come on here and complain at length about stuff that bugs them inordinately (background music, compressed titles, hand-held camerawork) tho' in truth it bothers hardly anyone else.

    I would cheerfully bet a pound to a penny that if you polled all the viewers of Getting On as to how many are made to feel nauseous by the camerawork, the overwhelming response would be a polite: 'Sorry, but I've no idea what you're talking about.' 


    It’s even more accurate to say that the overwhelming number of viewers of any BBC programme don’t bother to come onto these Boards to express any opinion at all. So there’s no way of knowing how bothered - or otherwise - they are. ‘Polling all the viewers of Getting On’ is hardly a practical proposition. In any case, how ‘nauseous’ it may make you feel probably depends on how intently you watch the screen and how sensitive you are to that kind of motion.

    However, one possible guide is the viewing figures. According to BARB, for w/e Oct 21, ‘Getting On’ attracted an audience of 547,000; for w/e Oct 28 it had dropped to 496,000. It’ll be interesting to see if this week’s figures recover or continue to slide. But even now it would be perverse to claim that the production technique couldn’t possibly have influenced some of those missing viewers.

    Interesting too that you conflate these comments with similar complaints about ‘background music’ which, you state, ‘in truth bothers hardly anyone else’. As regular posters will know, complaints about background music - along with mumbled dialogue and similar - were dismissed by many as age-related, maladjusted TVs, the moaning of a few and suchlike.

    However, there were sufficient complaints on Boards like these to prompt Danny Cohen to undertake a survey in 2011.

    To no-one’s surprise, Cohen’s survey discovered that the problems were real and primarily due to:
    - Unclear speech: mumbling or muffled dialogue, people talking over each other
    - Unfamiliar accents: viewers find accents they're not used to harder to understand
    - Background noise: locations with heavy traffic, babbling streams, farmyard animals
    - Background music: particularly spiky, heavily percussive music or lyrics that cut across dialogue
    Any of these can create problems for viewers, but when factors combine then people struggle to understand.  


    This resulted in the BBC issuing a series of Technical Guidance Notes.

    www.bbc.co.uk/academ...

    ‘Getting On’ is simply yet another example of how these Notes are still being ignored by production teams convinced that they know best and no problem actually exists.

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  • Message 45

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    Posted by Sandstrom (U14413284) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Really enjoying this.

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  • Message 46

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    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Friday, 16th November 2012

    Having read some of the previous comments I watched this on iPlayer with subtitles

    So funny and I identify with so many things....the 'all singing, all dancing bed, but had no training' scenario was hilarious.

    The side room complete with unconscious patient doubling as sister's office........didn't work for me as just a bit too silly.

    The ward round with the electronic equipment malfunctioning and then simply relying on the good old paper copies.....had me sniggering in recognition.

    The consultant attempting to rope everyone in with her 'vag-at' research project....so funny!

    And finally, Kim giving up her own time to talk to a troubled friend and colleague at the end of a very long day.....so typical of nurses and lovely too.....

    Oh! almost forgot - the diversity cupcakes!!!!  
    I could see Kim wanted a cupcake and was being pushed back all the time!

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  • Message 47

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    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Friday, 16th November 2012

    Just loved the fact that the cleaner had a bucket of law degrees etc. giving Pippa advice on the financial ins and outs.   I also liked the way Kim interacted with Stephen, and taking him out for fresh air so he could help her with her assignment.

    I also felt that the constant turning off of equipment was bound to result in catastrophe at some point...

    Once again, a great episode

    smiley - biggrin 
    I have a boss who complains about lights being left on all over the place - it's like working with the warden out of Dad's Army sometimes!

    I also liked Den humming 'Greatest Love Of All' after Hilary quoted it at her - is he a fan of School Of Rock at all?

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  • Message 48

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    Posted by Surabaya Johnny (U1163609) on Friday, 16th November 2012

    In reply to alan997:
    I would cheerfully bet a pound to a penny that if you polled all the viewers of Getting On as to how many are made to feel nauseous by the camerawork, the overwhelming response would be a polite: 'Sorry, but I've no idea what you're talking about.' 

    We will probably never know, but I suspect that most would say that they DO notice the wobbly camerawork, but perhaps don't mind it too much in this particular programme as they appreciate it's used to give a "documentary" feeling.

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  • Message 49

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    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 16th November 2012

    This week's was the best episode of the series so far, I thought.

    Last one next week, with a guest appearance from Hugh Bonneville.

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  • Message 50

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    Posted by Nick Brighton (U4274084) on Friday, 16th November 2012

    In reply to alan997:
    I would cheerfully bet a pound to a penny that if you polled all the viewers of Getting On as to how many are made to feel nauseous by the camerawork, the overwhelming response would be a polite: 'Sorry, but I've no idea what you're talking about.' 

    We will probably never know, but I suspect that most would say that they DO notice the wobbly camerawork, but perhaps don't mind it too much in this particular programme as they appreciate it's used to give a "documentary" feeling. 

    It doesn't make me nauseous..it just drives me mad

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