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Digital switchover rubbish

Messages: 21 - 12 of 32
  • Message 21. 

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    Posted by jonathon (U14496882) on Saturday, 19th February 2011

    if government could ban single side ban radios in the 70s after lots were sold they very easily do the same with digital?

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  • Message 22

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    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Saturday, 19th February 2011

    dab is a huge disappointment. reception is rubbish regardless of where you are dozens of stations are not available.

    when they switch FM off I guess I'll have to listen to the ipod in the car

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  • Message 23

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    Posted by Al (U1158256) on Saturday, 19th February 2011

    the other thing i don't like about the digital switchover is how it has been forced on us no one asked do you what this service, like when colour came out you were given a choice ... 

    A better analogy is the switch-off of 405-line (VHF) TV transmissions after the implementation of 625-line (UHF). We weren't given the option of staying with with the old format indefinitely.

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  • Message 24

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    Posted by Wobegone (U10662323) on Sunday, 20th February 2011

    In my experience DAB seems a less reliable form of RADIO than FM/analogue, so maybe digital TV will be less reliable than UHF?

    I bought my parents a DAB/FM stereo portable radio in 2004 (RED/Sainsbury's brand) . The DAB, which received 30+ stations will now only get 'Absloute' (the first station on DAB) & will not scan or tune to other DAB stations, yet it works fine on FM.

    This radio has been used daily in the kitchen for 6 years, but that shouldn't wear it out; as I say, it still works on FM. Mum also has a Ferguson analogue music centre that's been used almost daily for hours at a time since 1979 & a 1976 Binatone analogue (flip-card display) clock radio, which still works perfectly.

    My 2003 Bush clock radio's DAB packed in after about 2 years, except for occasional bursts up to an hour or so, when it feels like it, yet the clock & alarm still work!

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  • Message 25

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    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Sunday, 20th February 2011

    I have no idea how many stations my DAB can receive (pure couple of years old) but it doesn't pick up the stations I want to listen to. I can get these fine on FM both in the house and the car but regardless of where I live and where in the house the radio is it just doesn't tune in.

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  • Message 26

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    Posted by Piltdown (U6504098) on Friday, 11th March 2011

    For the past two days I've been getting a message on my TV screen warning me that I may have to re-tune my digital tuner; IN SEPTEMBER.

    Sorry if you hadn't noticed BBC but it's SIX MONTHS away. Am I going to get this stupid unnecessary message every time I switch on my set for the next six months? Do you think I'm stupid or is it you?

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  • Message 27

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    Posted by lluncoolj (U7676659) on Saturday, 12th March 2011


    Green? Contrary to what many think we switch all power off to box and TV when finished viewing, 

    Don't bother about being green. STB's on standby aren't going to save the planet while uninsulated DIY stores and supermarkets and open-doored high street shops pump megawatts of heat into the atmosphere.

    And, just when you think you bought the latest equipment:

    But yesterday, the BBC Trust gave its final approval to a BBC-led initiative codenamed Project Canvas, which will see a new kind of Freeview box that links directly to the internet. The service, which is likely to be marketed as YouView, will receive ordinary TV channels in exactly the same way as Freeview. But its broadband connection will mean that it can stream video-on-demand straight to a television set, without the need for a computer. 

    Well as DSO is not costing the govermenst a penny - and it stands to get af few billion in money from the sale of the spare frequencies - 
    Or 'auctioning fresh air' as it is known.

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  • Message 28

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    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Sunday, 13th March 2011



    And, just when you think you bought the latest equipment:

    But yesterday, the BBC Trust gave its final approval to a BBC-led initiative codenamed Project Canvas, which will see a new kind of Freeview box that links directly to the internet. The service, which is likely to be marketed as YouView, will receive ordinary TV channels in exactly the same way as Freeview. But its broadband connection will mean that it can stream video-on-demand straight to a television set, without the need for a computer. 


     
    Like that is going to work!

    you've got more and more ISP's operating Traffic Management and throttling especially during peak hours and introducing monthly caps.

    large areas of the country on snail speed internet at the best of times and that's a no goer

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  • Message 29

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    Posted by alfie atkins (U14812793) on Sunday, 13th March 2011

    i watched all three services freeview,cable and sky and i don't think i will be bothering as it rubbish.the freeview service freezes everytime the wind gets abit blowy,i asked a few other people they say there not going to bother for one the cost and other it just full of repeats.

    also the other factor is it green as the digital signal need more repeaters to get the signal out, that with the extra power of the digital boxes it isn't green.

    love to hear what others think?
     
    You're spot on J, the weather affects many peoples signal. Bring back Analogue! Analogue was consistent. Although the dtv is consistent too, consistently POOR. I'm with you on this one.

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  • Message 30

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    Posted by Eponymous Cowherd (U13748135) on Tuesday, 15th March 2011

    The thing is, the old analogue service degrades gracefully under adverse conditions. I live over 30 miles from the transmitter and, hence, have a zonking great aerial, a masthead amplifier and a distribution amp.

    Most of the time I do get a fair signal, but adverse weather or man-made interference can make Freeview completely unusable.

    Similar conditions merely cause the analogue picture to become a bit snowy or cause a few "noise bars".

    I certainly hope that the power increase after the change-over will reduce these problems, but currently I have to agree that the performance of Freeview is unacceptable.

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  • Message 31

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    Posted by jonathon (U14496882) on Wednesday, 13th April 2011

    after the first digital switchover over last night nottinghamshire i got to say Rubbish still blocks and freezes on channels not going bother with a telly licease much longer only going use the telly for me play VHS tapes now. as i can't the point.

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  • Message 32

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    Posted by dod19 (U14705887) on Saturday, 7th May 2011

    after the first digital switchover over last night nottinghamshire i got to say Rubbish still blocks and freezes on channels not going bother with a telly licease much longer only going use the telly for me play VHS tapes now. as i can't the point.   I sympathise. Digital is all about your location. We had the switchover a year ago from a secondary transmitter and for 9 months had problems receiving a picture but, of course, still had to pay the Licence Fee. Due to the terrain of our area we cannot receive satellite so Freesat or Sky out of the question and spent money on booster and new aerial. Good news, love the variety of programmes. Recently visited someone in another area with analogue BBC 1,2,3,4 & ITV1 and it reminded me how awful that was! Hoping that over time the transmitters will improve their signal to difficult areas but all in all much prefer the choice of programmes. It would , however, have been better had the Digital Technical people foreseen problems in certain areas before the switchover.

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