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Freeview

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Messages: 1 - 14 of 14
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by OldCookie (U4462057) on Monday, 9th February 2009

    I have two freeview boxes but find very often there is no picture just a blue screen on many of the channels. I was advised by a salesman in Currys to purchase a new scart lead that cost 30, which is more than the Freeview box cost but I must say if has improved, but I still get the picture breaking up now and again. I live in Wiltshire and we go digital next year so unless the reception is improved we will not be watching much TV. We as pensioners cannot afford to buy new TVs but are reliant on the freeview box.
    Does anyone know if the reception from the Mendip transmitter will be stronger next year?
    Thanks

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by McNigel (U3215979) on Monday, 9th February 2009

    That sounds like two problems.
    The blue screen is most likely your television getting no signal from the Freeview box and a new SCART lead might well have improved that, although 30 is a rip-off and just wriggling it might have worked.

    The picture breaking up is not enough signal coming from the aerial into the Freeview box.

    Assuming you have a good signal in your area.
    First check all the connections. If things change when wiggled they need fixing.

    Lastly it could be the aerial, but you want to hope not.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Monday, 9th February 2009

    Yes when the analogue signal is switched off then digital signal will go up.

    It may help if you could say which channels give you a blue screen ..
    the Digital Signal is sent in things call multiplexes which carry a bundle of services

    note down what you cannot get and you might find it is just one multiplex see list www.bbc.co.uk/recept...

    Multiplexes 2 and A are transmitted slightly diferently which may be a problem if the signal is weak. so you loose ITV CH4 and Ch5 say.

    BUT your aerial leads may be the problem - just check that everything is plugged in and twist tthe plugs to make it a better contact.

    I agree you have been ripped off by the SCART leads - but check that they are in and also in the right hole on the back of the TV.
    Sounds simple - but the SCART connectors do tend to fall out ( some times you loose just the sound)

    My 80 year old Mother had problems with pictures flashing on and off - and it took me TWO attemepts to get the SCARTs in tight enough.
    But it lasted over Christmas and until now!!!

    Hope you get all pictures back!!!

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Smilie Minogue (U8747614) on Monday, 9th February 2009

    but I still get the picture breaking up now and again. I live in Wiltshire and we go digital next year so unless the reception is improved we will not be watching much TV. 

    Don't worry OldCookie, I live in the Scottish Borders and we went digital in November. I can confirm that I no longer get any break up of the picture on my Freeview.<smiley>

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by SONYJIM (U1169869) on Monday, 9th February 2009

    Where is your Aeriel.
    Some people have an aeriel in the roof space which was about adequate for the analogue transmissions, but is not suitable for digital until the output signal increases when analogue is finished.
    If it is in the roof space, and the problem is quite recent, it could be that snow on the roof is attenuating the signal.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by OldCookie (U4462057) on Wednesday, 11th February 2009

    Thanks for the info. The TV in the kitchen has an ordinary scart lead and this is the one today that I can get channels 1, 2 & 80 but no others,it is connected to the same TV aerial as the one in the lounge. I have just checked the lounge TV with the 'rip off' scart lead and that is working on all channels, so cannot see it is a problem with the aerial which we have only had for about 3 years and is situated on the outside house roof. I read somewhere that the gold plated scart leads are better than the silver ones, do you know if this is correct?

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by OldCookie (U4462057) on Wednesday, 11th February 2009

    Great news thanks

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by OldCookie (U4462057) on Wednesday, 11th February 2009

    On the house roof and is only about 4 years old.
    It is showing signal strength of 70% today but still on some channels the picture is breaking up. Today 3 is especially bad. I have had this problem long before the snow arrived.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by itrium (U13724821) on Wednesday, 11th February 2009

    You mention that you use the same aerial with two set top boxes. How have you connected these two boxes to the same aerial? Funny things can happen if there is not a direct connection between the aerial and the receiver.
    Gold plated scart leads may give better contact over a period of years as they will not corrode so easily as nickel plated leads. As said earlier, a good wiggle will sort out any dubious connections. If the scart pins look clean, it is probably ok.

    DogFree

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by SONYJIM (U1169869) on Thursday, 12th February 2009

    I agree with Dogfree. Two sets connected to the same aeriel can produce wierd results.
    Have you considered an aeriel amplifier which has one input from the roof aeriel and two outputs to feed the sets in different rooms.
    I used one for years and the improvement was remarkable.
    They are not expensive but do require and mains connection.

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Martyn the retired (U1168764) on Thursday, 12th February 2009

    OldCookie (and for that matter others too!)

    Gold plated SCARTS - pointless.

    You need pay no more that 15 for an "all pins connected" SCART lead with nice long, thick and flexy wire and with a manufacturers name you've heard of. You can in fact often get good leads for less.

    The thickness of gold plating on circuit board plugs is such that ten removals and insertions later, you've often worn through the plating. And, if you do chromium plating properly (not all do) it is cheaper than chrome as well!

    regards, Martyn

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Martyn the retired (U1168764) on Thursday, 12th February 2009

    Whoops - I meant to clearly say, gold plating is cheaper than chrome if you do it properly (chrome plating uses very nasty chemicals).

    regards Martyn

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Gizmomoo (U10999499) on Friday, 13th February 2009

    Sounds like it is your aeriel.

    Check that before buying gold SCARTS.

    I was told by someone in the know that the "gold SCARTS are best" scenario is a red herring.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Smilie Minogue (U8747614) on Friday, 13th February 2009

    I've been told that too Gizmomoo. <smiley>

    Report message14

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