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Fightback Britain

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by lucy (U14792533) on ,

    New programme due on BBC1 tomorrow evening. Guess who's presenting?
    I'm sensing Julia Bradbury overload now and am scared to turn the telly on!!

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  • Message 2

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    Posted by zen cat cherintherye (U14877400) on ,

    Is Julia Bradbury really so bad?

    Not my thing, so I won't be watching, whoever the presenters are.

    Of course,

    there's two of them,

    so,

    they'll probably take it in turns

    to complete a

    sentence.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on ,

    www.bbc.co.uk/mediac...

    Last year, one in six of us were victims of crime, but new BBC One series Fightback Britain shows how the great British public are refusing to take this lying down and are helping the police fight back against the criminals.

    Presenters Julia Bradbury and Adrian Simpson show how people throughout Britain are making life tough for the bad guys by capturing evidence for the police using the latest cameras, computer software, amateur detective work and sometimes even putting their own lives in danger.

    In the first episode of this four-part series we meet the lorry drivers who bravely step in to try and avert disaster when a 30-tonne lorry hurtles down a motorway in the wrong direction, and a gang of weapon-wielding motorbike thieves gets more than it bargained for when a group of shop owners bands together to stop the theft of £50,000-worth of motorcycles.

    We meet a man whose computer software enabled his stolen laptop to email him pictures of the people it ultimately wound up with as they sat unawares in bed, before being arrested by the police! And Julia and Adrian test the latest anti-theft software for your smart phone. With almost half of all robberies in Britain now involving a mobile phone, it could help you get your own back on the phone snatchers.

    And finally we meet a woman who is so tired of getting her knickers stolen from her washing line she sets a trap using night vision cameras to catch the thief in act and hang him out to dry, only to be thwarted initially by her husband falling asleep on the job!

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  • Message 4

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    Posted by zen cat cherintherye (U14877400) on ,

    Last year, one in six of us were victims of crime... 
    So, one in six have bank accounts. ;)

    Time to begin the fightback. Meet you on the barricades.

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  • Message 5

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on ,

    New programme due on BBC1 tomorrow evening. Guess who's presenting?
    I'm sensing Julia Bradbury overload now and am scared to turn the telly on!! 
    I can't help thinking of the thousands of qualified or upcoming presenters who are denied the chance to present at least one programme on the BBC whilst others are sittiing on a growing portfolio, exhibiting no special qualities to justify this nest feathering.

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  • Message 6

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    Posted by GaryB007 (U3895241) on ,

    I know the Beeb don't usually make much of an effort with whatever programme they put up against Coronation Street, because they know it won't get many viewers, but this is really scraping the barrel.

    It contained every production cliché known to man (and woman) in an effort to try and liven up their boring material - fake film effect, overblown colours & brightness, wobbly camera, rotating camera, overlong reconstructions, assorted shots of the "herooes", etc etc.

    Complete tripe.

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  • Message 7

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    Posted by Onslow The Cat (U13672446) on ,

    New programme due on BBC1 tomorrow evening. Guess who's presenting?
    I'm sensing Julia Bradbury overload now and am scared to turn the telly on!! 
    I can't help thinking of the thousands of qualified or upcoming presenters who are denied the chance to present at least one programme on the BBC whilst others are sittiing on a growing portfolio, exhibiting no special qualities to justify this nest feathering. 
    Pancho Wilkins I agree with you, but as I'm sixty and not interested in applying for the job how about you stepping up for duty?

    Oh and PS hope you beat the Dimblebys.

    Best wishes,

    <blackcat>

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  • Message 8

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    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on ,

    I am really tired of seeing the same old presenters too, how about a bit of fresh blood?

    I always thought that the police tried to deter the public from having a go, surely this will encourage them.

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  • Message 9

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    Posted by Leslie Knope (U15651766) on ,

    I saw this on the iPlayer home page and fast forwarded it to the report on the mobile phone tracking...and then again to the end of the report as they'd come over all Channel 4 ('we'll find out how they got on later in the show')...the app looked worth investigating, but they didn't tell us what it was. What's the point of that?!

    (Of course, it's entirely possible they mentioned it 'later in the show' but to be honest it didn't look worth the effort of watching the remainder.)

    Anyone have any ideas what the app might have been?

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  • Message 10

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    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) ** on ,

    It contained every production cliché known to man (and woman) in an effort to try and liven up their boring material - fake film effect, overblown colours & brightness, wobbly camera, rotating camera, overlong reconstructions, assorted shots of the "herooes", etc etc.
     


    Not forgetting the ubiquitous......"We'll find out what happened later in the show"

    What the hell is the point of breaking it down into 5 minutes segments? The entire programme is only half an hour long so I'm sure we could cope with an item that lasted 10 minutes

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  • Message 11

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    Posted by bluepuma (U15814198) on ,

    Yet another BBC 'factual' programme made unwatchable by constantly switching from one storyline to another. INFURIATING. I'm eleven minutes in and we're already on the fourth different segment - and no sign in sight of the conclusion of the first one.

    Not everyone watching has the some attention deficit disorder!

    Can you ever make a programme without using the words "meanwhile", "earlier" or "later on"? I doubt it...

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  • Message 12

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    Posted by the cycling gardener (U2350416) on ,

    Yet another BBC 'factual' programme made unwatchable by constantly switching from one storyline to another. INFURIATING. I'm eleven minutes in and we're already on the fourth different segment - and no sign in sight of the conclusion of the first one.

    Not everyone watching has the some attention deficit disorder!

    Can you ever make a programme without using the words "meanwhile", "earlier" or "later on"? I doubt it... 
    I agree. When I read a book I don't switch between three or four. If I read an article in the press I start at the beginning and continue uninterrupted to the end. This silly fashion for skipping backwards and forwards from one story to the next without seeing them through is extremely annoying. Why are programme makers doing this? The public at large don't suffer from attention deficit disorder. I got so fed up with Fightback Britain I fought back and turned to another channel.

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  • Message 13

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    Posted by Maxibaby (U14151672) ** on ,

    Yet another BBC 'factual' programme made unwatchable by constantly switching from one storyline to another. INFURIATING. I'm eleven minutes in and we're already on the fourth different segment - and no sign in sight of the conclusion of the first one.

    Not everyone watching has the some attention deficit disorder!

    Can you ever make a programme without using the words "meanwhile", "earlier" or "later on"? I doubt it... 
    I agree. When I read a book I don't switch between three or four. If I read an article in the press I start at the beginning and continue uninterrupted to the end. This silly fashion for skipping backwards and forwards from one story to the next without seeing them through is extremely annoying. Why are programme makers doing this? The public at large don't suffer from attention deficit disorder. I got so fed up with Fightback Britain I fought back and turned to another channel. 
    This is a very annoying fashion in presenting. We don't need everything broken down into bite-size bits, and it's even worse when the presenter goes over all that happened in the previous bit. Do programme makers really think this adds anything to the production, or are they just following the current fashion for segmentisation? It does seem that once one producer goes down a particular road, every other one follows like an obedient sheep.

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  • Message 14

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    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) ** on ,

    Yet another BBC 'factual' programme made unwatchable by constantly switching from one storyline to another. INFURIATING. I'm eleven minutes in and we're already on the fourth different segment - and no sign in sight of the conclusion of the first one.

     

    I recorded this programme and thought I'd watch a bit of it before bedtime. As a former truck driver the first item was of some interest. However after a few minutes we got the usual " Find out what happens later on in the programme". I thought "sod this" and deleted the programme and went to bed. Why can't we finish the current subject before zooming off to something else? It's only a half hour show so there's hardly time to get bored is there? Do the programme makers think they can keep us hanging on by drip feeding us information. I won't even bother recording it next week

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  • Message 15

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    Posted by Prophet Tenebrae (U5995226) on ,

    The simple answer is ratings.

    It's essentially the television equivalent of blackmail. They probably know a significant number of people will only be interested in one or two segments - so by splitting them up, they're holding the information you want hostage and forcing you to watch the rest of the programme.

    I find it irritating mostly by virtue of the fact it also means that runtimes are padded with a recap of what we just saw...

    It's more acceptable on something like Mythbusters, with something purportedly factual it's ridiculous.

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  • Message 16

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    Posted by GaryB007 (U3895241) on ,

    I gave this a go just in case it had anything decent to offer. As I posted above, it was a complete pile of steaming wotsit, so I whizzed to the end on the PVR just to set the result of the lunatic in the truck and then deleted it, together with the series link.

    For all the effort they make against Corrie, maybe the BBC should save some money and just show only cheapo repeats - or the test card.

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  • Message 17

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    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on ,

    It wasn't even as advertised. I thought the lorry "bit" (the only bit I see - and the second bit of that, apparently) would have involved a previously unseen level of expertise in sliding a trailer out so that the lorry "hurtling" down the motorway would crash into them, causing all sorts of carnage, with criminal driver splattered all over the place.

    No.

    One of the lorries stopped and the errant lorry come to a very gentle, it looked, stop in front of it. Another lorry, driven by a driver unseen, had already stopped and another, wait for it, pulled up...alongside. And just in case the CCTV didn't illustrate it enough, we were treated to, possibly, the worst reconstruction of one lorry pulling alongside another, EVER...though I guess that was also probably the first reconstruction of one lorry pulling alongside another.

    At the end our "heroes", who up until now had been happily advertising their employers, were pictured standing by their trucks, looking hard, and then folded their arms, in unison, thus instantaneously rendering them camp.

    If you didn't see it, the above is a faithful description of the cheap, utterly pointless, bilge that the BBC put out as prime time entertainment, yesterday evening.

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  • Message 18

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    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) ** on ,

    They probably know a significant number of people will only be interested in one or two segments - so by splitting them up, they're holding the information you want hostage and forcing you to watch the rest of the programme.
     


    Well it doesn't work with me. Take something like Watchdog, which isn't a patch on what it should be. I record it and then fast-forward through all the dross(mostly Matt Alwright's contribution) until I get to an item I actually want to watch.

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  • Message 19

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    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on ,

    They probably know a significant number of people will only be interested in one or two segments - so by splitting them up, they're holding the information you want hostage and forcing you to watch the rest of the programme.
     


    Well it doesn't work with me. Take something like Watchdog, which isn't a patch on what it should be. I record it and then fast-forward through all the dross(mostly Matt Alwright's contribution) until I get to an item I actually want to watch. 
    All that playacting is cringeworthy.

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  • Message 20

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    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) ** on ,

    Yet another BBC 'factual' programme made unwatchable by constantly switching from one storyline to another. INFURIATING. I'm eleven minutes in and we're already on the fourth different segment - and no sign in sight of the conclusion of the first one.

    Not everyone watching has the some attention deficit disorder!

    Can you ever make a programme without using the words "meanwhile", "earlier" or "later on"? I doubt it... 
    It's not just the BBC. Like a rash - this ridiculous 'segmenting' with 'replay' etc is spreading.....

    A morning programme (on another channel) has two presenters repeating endlessly and delaying to the point of losing the will to live for me.

    All that can be heard from the depths of my sofa is the oft repeated cry:

    'Oh, get on with it, you stupid .......'

    As for the fragrant Julia Bradbury........ <yikes> <steam>

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