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Saints and Scroungers

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Messages: 1 - 20 of 30
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by dianaforever (U14855517) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    I find the way that stories are chopped up and then intermingled confusing.

    Does anyone like this method of presentation ?

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by alansmithee (U1690014) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    I also dislike it, but unfortunately it's become common for programmes like this to constantly remind you what's coming up, not just at the beginning of the programme, but also constantly during it as well.

    They try to create this 'cliffhanger' tension by breaking the stories up, showing you brief glimpses of what happens next, all in the hope you will stay tuned to the end of the programme and not change channel.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Lurkalot (U15611853) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    it's to keep our attention going. they think we are all thick and might get bored with one storyline!

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Whenever this subject is raised on POV, just about everyone says they hate it, that it's patronising and time wasting, and is just a cheap way of filling up the time. It's only the highly paid programme makers who want it.

    Time the BBC started listening to the people who pay their wages, and stopped this patronising nonsense of treating us all like 5 year olds.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    Time the BBC started listening to the people who pay their wages, and stopped this patronising nonsense of treating us all like 5 year olds. 
    That time will be when the devil wears a fur coat.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by zelda (U2012536) on Thursday, 14th February 2013

    I see they have ditched the Dire Dom Littlewood for the irritating dumbed down so and so Matt (Not) Allwright..... says just about all you need to know about the tone of the programme.

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  • Message 7

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    Posted by Prophet Tenebrae (U5995226) on Thursday, 14th February 2013

    I find the way that stories are chopped up and then intermingled confusing.

    Does anyone like this method of presentation ? 
    The BBC knows (they don't think, they KNOW) you're too stupid to be able to handle a whole story at once. So they chop it up into itty bitty pieces to spoon feed you like the child they KNOW you are.

    It's for your own good!

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Onslow The Cat (U13672446) on Thursday, 14th February 2013

    I see they have ditched the Dire Dom Littlewood for the irritating dumbed down so and so Matt (Not) Allwright..... says just about all you need to know about the tone of the programme. 

    Littlegood

    smiley - blackcat

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by DurhamViper (U7044082) on Friday, 15th February 2013

    I see they have ditched the Dire Dom Littlewood for the irritating dumbed down so and so Matt (Not) Allwright..... says just about all you need to know about the tone of the programme.  They've obviously given Matt Allwright the job so he can spot if any of his future colleagues are benefit cheats smiley - winkeye

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Friday, 15th February 2013

    Does anyone like this method of presentation ?



    It's called artificial filling.

    Or making 12 minutes worth of material last at least twice as long.



    ( Hang on did I use the word 'worth' in a thread discussing this programme. Apologies for that )

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  • Message 11

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    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Friday, 15th February 2013

    "Time the BBC started listening to the people who pay their wages" ............................... smiley - laugh smiley - laugh smiley - laugh smiley - wah

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by briggsy2 (U1288489) on Saturday, 16th February 2013

    I hate the overuse of the word "Scrounger." If I had my way it would be banished to Room101 along with most of the people who (mis)use it. [Mind you, I accept that as a result the readership of The Mail and The Sun would drop to virtually zero overnight & both publications would cease publication immediately - blimey, this sounds better by the minute!]

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by xanadutheblue (U2940564) on Saturday, 16th February 2013

    That time will be when the devil wears a fur coat. 

    I like it! smiley - laugh

    I find it irritating when a presenter has to remind you of something they said five minutes ago... and five minutes before that! We minht all have switched on a minute or two ago, but the chances are they think we are too thick to remember! smiley - grr

    I've done some freelance journalism work. You state something once... and once only!!! I re-read something of mine recently and found I'd used the word 'bay' twice of the same horse! I cringed with embarassment over one three-letter word! If these people had any idea, they'd be so mortified that only thoughts of their pay packets would get them out of bed the next morning!

    Of course, if you have nothing to say but make it wish to appear that you are saying something...

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  • Message 14

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    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Monday, 18th February 2013

    I hate the overuse of the word "Scrounger." If I had my way it would be banished to Room101 along with most of the people who (mis)use it. [Mind you, I accept that as a result the readership of The Mail and The Sun would drop to virtually zero overnight & both publications would cease publication immediately - blimey, this sounds better by the minute!]  Yes but the Nortccliffe family who own the Daily Mail think they control the Conservative party.
    There is a Joke in an old Joke book about Politicians, sorry I can't quote it verbatum, but it goes something like this, the Conservative P.M.was going to resign ( in the 20's) so Lord Northcliffe sent for the King, they thought they ran the Conservative pary then and I don't think much has changed

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  • Message 15

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    Posted by Maxibaby (U14151672) on Monday, 18th February 2013

    Whenever this subject is raised on POV, just about everyone says they hate it, that it's patronising and time wasting, and is just a cheap way of filling up the time. It's only the highly paid programme makers who want it.

    Time the BBC started listening to the people who pay their wages, and stopped this patronising nonsense of treating us all like 5 year olds. 
    How about if we start a thread here saying how wonderful this style of presentation is, and how much we enjoy it? Everyone could make an entry so we get what appears to be a good representation of the viewing public, and the BBC would be bound to drop it immediately just in case they were accused of listening to viewers.

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Viligante (U14039144) on Tuesday, 19th February 2013


    This morning I *accidentally* caught the last 10 minutes of this programme and the presenter's comments at the end were so childish I cringed with embarrassment.

    Serves me right for watching it!

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  • Message 17

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    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 18

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    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Monday, 25th February 2013

    >>found I'd used the word 'bay' twice of the same horse!


    I know what you mean.

    Both BBC tv and radio are littered with this appallingly lazy, careless and unprofessional error nowadays.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by PrinceEugene (U13933926) on Tuesday, 26th February 2013

    I'm not too keen on the word "scrounger" either, but the use of the other word is even more troubling. How does the BBC get away with the patronising assumption that every disabled or seriously ill person is a saint?

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Tuesday, 26th February 2013

    Prince,
    No need to use the word 'patronising '. With almost everything the bbc produces, that's a given

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