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Hitting

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Messages: 1 - 10 of 10
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Sunday, 10th February 2013

    "Astronomers are keeping a wary eye on a large asteroid expected to narrowly miss hitting Earth next Friday in the closest known approach of a dangerous cosmic object since NASA started tracking such debris."

    online.wsj.com/artic...

    How should I read the word "hitting" ? Is it a noun or a verbal noun created from
    the word "hit"?

    A subsidiary question:
    If I wanted to write the title of this question more precisely what should I use:

    "Denotation of hitting in the phrase" or "Function of hitting in the phrase" ?

    Thank you.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by OldRover_KE (U10528653) on Monday, 11th February 2013

    I would call it the present participle of the verb 'hit'. Others might disagree.

    Your title 'Hitting' is just fine, compared to some of the useless titles we tend to get in this forum. It mentions the very word you are asking about. You could say 'Part of speech – hitting' but it's not necessary.

    Other forums stipulate:

    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

    Rover

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Monday, 11th February 2013

    Thank you, Rover.
    I asked because in this phrase below are two words that confuse me:
    "miss" + "hitting"

    I would use only one of them (if they are both verbs) and thus:
    ".... expected to narrowly miss Earth..."
    or
    " expected to narrowly hitting Earth..."
    Could the phrase below be changed the way I made it?

    Original sentence:
    " Astronomers are keeping a wary eye on a large asteroid expected to narrowly miss hitting Earth..."

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Monday, 11th February 2013

    It seems I've puzzled it more, because "miss Earth" and "hitting Earth" are two different meanings.
    I have looked on the internet and Google search results show these two words "miss hitting" together in more cases.

    I also wanted to know in my msg #1 whether I used those two words "denotation" or "function" correctly or it should be used "meaning" instead of them.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Monday, 11th February 2013

    Probably you don't know what I wanted to know.

    I try to ask again. I don't know to use words "denotation" and "connotation" correctly, because I have not enough practice using them (lack of practice).
    I wanted to know in my subsidiary question whether is the word "denotation" correct, or should be used "function", "meaning" or any other word.

    "Denotation of the word "hitting" in the phrase"
    or
    "Function of the word "hitting" in the phrase"
    or
    "Meaning of the word "hitting" in the phrase"

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by OldRover_KE (U10528653) on Tuesday, 12th February 2013

    The word 'function' is best to ask about a part of speech.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Tuesday, 12th February 2013

    Thank you for the answer, Rover.
    I once asked here about these two words - "connotation" and "denotation", but I rather avoid them in writing because I am not sure when they should be used.
    I rather use "meaning" instead of them.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by OldRover_KE (U10528653) on Tuesday, 12th February 2013

    You are wise to use 'meaning' rather than 'connotation' or 'denotation'.

    It's best to use a simple word rather than an unusual one.

    Rover

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Tuesday, 12th February 2013

    Thank you for advise, Rover.
    If these words are more unusual than commonly used I'd rather avoid them and let the native English speakers to use them. I will understand the meaning. smiley - smiley

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by zl_bbc (U14552627) on Tuesday, 12th February 2013

    Correction:
    Should be "advice".

    Report message10

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