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myPlayer

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  • Message 1. Posted by Eponymous Cowherd (U13748135) on Friday, 19th November 2010 permalink

    I see the BBC has C&D'd myPlayer as well as beebplayer.

    Now most Android phone owners (those who run Android 2.1 or lower) have no access to iPlayer.

    Personally I find it disgusting that the BBC is denying a service to legitimate licence payers through these 3rd party applications while it refuses to provide access itself.

    It really irks that the BBC will jump through hoops to provide iPlayer access to iPhone and iPad owners where Apple refuse to permit Flash on these devices, but refuse to do the same for Android owners whose devices cannot run Flash.

    Either provide non-Flash iPlayer access to Android, or STOP KILLING THE APPS THAT DO!!!

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  • Message 2. Posted by grayme (U14695236) on Saturday, 20th November 2010 permalink

    myPlayer was also very useful for the Windows Mobile (or Android) HTC HD2.

    I honestly don't get it, like you say it was not competing with a BBC product as they don't provide one!

    It was also so professional, it could have been seen as an official product.

    Why didn't the BBC work with the developer rather than can him?

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  • Message 3. Posted by grayme (U14695236) on Saturday, 20th November 2010 permalink

    BTW, I have read that if you go to 4shared (file hoster) and search for myplayer, you will find the version that works with the BBC, it was uploaded by awigham.

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  • Message 4. Posted by EggOnAStilt (U7111730) on Saturday, 20th November 2010 permalink

    Do you have to pay for these apps?

    <friedegg>

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  • Message 5. Posted by Bowchaser (U13670155) on Saturday, 20th November 2010 permalink

    The BBC claims it tries to make its content available as widely as possible and yet it's executives stopping this from happening by deeming 'Myplayer is in breach of the BBC terms of use.' (Raspberry sound here)

    At the end of the day they are denying the content to people that pay their wages and have already paid for that content.

    Thanks grayme for your input 'very much appreciated'

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  • Message 6. Posted by Eponymous Cowherd (U13748135) on Sunday, 21st November 2010 permalink

    Both beebplayer and myplayer were free applications. Their aim was merely to provide iPlayer access on a platform (android) where the BBC itself makes no provision. Neither brought the BBC into any. Any disrepute or in any way portrayed it in a bad light (unlike the BBS's own actions over this matter.

    It is particularly irksome that it was licence fee money that likely paid the lawyers who forced beebplayer and myplayer off of Android. We are, in effect, paying to have access to the programmes we have paid for denied to us.

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  • Message 7. Posted by Joe Adams (U9191804) on Monday, 22nd November 2010 permalink

    I too am disgusted by the decision to pull the myPlayer. Why? I can see no logic. Most android devices are not capable of using the BBC version of iPlayer, and myPlayer was filling a hole. It was well made, had no advertising and was free, so I cannot see any conflict of interest.

    Why is the BBC cutting off ways to view its own content? If the BBC was less pro apple and did a decent Android version (after all it has done an iPhone and iPad one even tho there are now more Androids) then maybe I could understand the reason to close the 3rd party off.

    I am normally a big BBC fanboy. Recently you have lost the plot. 1st the new news website and closing your eyes to all the negative comments, even tho you took away much funtionality (low graphics versions etc). And now this, You have lost a fan BBC.

    We pay your fee - bring back myPlayer - my 4year old is devestated that he can no longer watch Octanaughts in the car.

    Sort it out Beeb

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  • Message 8. Posted by NX3 (U14550151) on Monday, 22nd November 2010 permalink

    Very disappointed that the BBC killed Beebplayer and myplayer on Android and yet provide no alternative.

    The BBC supports Apple, RIM and claimed Adobe flash support would remove the need for cross platform support. If that was true why do the BBC provide cross platform support ? Why don't the BBC support Android ? Relying on Adobe to provide flash limits the handsets that can use the BBC iPlayer or live streams to the minority. Why are the majority of Android devices which are technically capable of playing flash videos shunned ?

    I've got Flash 10.1 Lite on my handset but no BBC streams work yet all your competitors sites they do work.

    Focus on delivering a working solutions for Android rather than chasing down those who do for FREE.

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  • Message 9. Posted by Eponymous Cowherd (U13748135) on Tuesday, 23rd November 2010 permalink

    Actually, there are streams provided by the BBC that ALL Android phones are perfectly capable of playing. These are the streams intended for Nokia "N" series phones in 3GP format.

    It was these streams that BeebPlayer provided access to. But the BBC shut that facility down, claiming that BeebPlayer was an "unauthorised distributor" of iPlayer content.

    It wasn't, of course, It merely presented the material, and no more "redistributed" it than Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Opera, etc on a PC. It merely acted as a specialised web browser, allowing the user to select a programme and load in into the built in Android media player.

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  • Message 10. Posted by originalricster (U14704666) on Sunday, 28th November 2010 permalink

    Boo, BBC!

    I'm normally a strong advocate of the British Broadcasting Corp' but this all seems a bit childish on your part. I can't see the harm in allowing these outstanding applications to bring your content to Android (Pre FroYo) users.

    If you're going to pull the plug on them then how about an alternative?

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  • Message 11. Posted by johno_wilts (U14720883) on Sunday, 12th December 2010 permalink

    The decision to close down myPlayer without a replacement is unbelievable! This was an excellent app, limited playing to those with a uk connection and most importantly allowed download, so that you can watch programmes in places without good connectivity, e.g. train, tube etc. I canít believe the BBC would close down this app without providing a replacement. It is about time content providers listened to how their customers wanted to consume their content, rather than removing options, even in the face of massive demand. How can the BBC claim to meet the demand of their paying customers? UN-BE-LIEVABLE!

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  • Message 12. Posted by t0neloc (U14457671) on Sunday, 12th December 2010 permalink

    Well done BBC. Take away a well used facility without providing any alternative.
    I fully understand your reasons for wanting to use a standard technology (Flash) for delivering iplayer content but have you actually considered who is able to get it? Flash will NEVER be available for the vast majority of current Android users and also most of the devices currently being manufactured. Adobe have no intention of releasing a version for the ARMv6 processors that nearly all of them use.
    So why demand the close down of a professional quality application, freely available and doing nothing but promoting your content?
    I believe your stance on this is extremely short-sighted and has done nothing to promote you as a Public Service provider. You're allowing it on the iPhone without Flash. Why not us?
    Perhaps you could answer that ?

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  • Message 13. Posted by baraduim (U561321) on Monday, 13th December 2010 permalink

    Just tried the mobile iplayer service via the browser. Great, except that (a) couldn't download the programme in question to watch offline at my leisure, but more importantly (b) once the video started there was no way to stop if if you accidentally backed out of full sceeen - the video disappeared and the only way to stop playback (i.e. sound) was to manually Force Stop the browser.

    myplayer was simple, elegant, and worked exactly how you'd want the online iplayer service to work (which itself is much worse than the previous online.

    The BBC should be providing access to *all* their licence-payers and not just a subset. Excluding us Android users isn't particularly fair.

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  • Message 14. Posted by Eponymous Cowherd (U13748135) on Tuesday, 14th December 2010 permalink

    The BBC's browser (Flash) based iPlayer application is not available to most Android users, and, as you have discovered, for those that can use it, it offers a sub-standard experience.

    I encourage all Android users to see the "Recind the takedown orders against BeebPlayer and MyPlayer" thread in the "Suggestions" messageboard and post "me too". Lets keep this suggestion at the top of the pile.

    We know the BBC won't act on it, but let's make our presence felt. Don't let them sweep the issue under the carpet. Their behaviour regarding these 3rd party Android apps is disgusting, particularly in the light of the favouritism given to (non Flash) Apple devices.

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  • Message 15. Posted by markle (U13903210) on Tuesday, 14th December 2010 permalink

    Ridiculous.

    If the BBC do not want to create their own Android app, then fine. But then don't go shutting down apps created by volunteers that let people use publicly-accessible streams for the content.


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