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Fighting in WWII

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Messages: 1 - 21 of 21
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by shiage (U7768792) on Monday, 12th March 2007

    How does it feel to know you fought in WWII?

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Trooper Tom Canning - WW2 Site Helper (U519668) on Monday, 12th March 2007

    Shiage -
    Strange question - "How does it feel to know you fought in WW11. ?"

    Looking around the present day world there can only be a sense of failure inasmuch as there appears to be more politicians legislating for many things we fought against, as to-day those things are acceptable.... I mean they are passing bills almost daily about Euthanasia - Genocide - Abortion - there are more wars to-day than there has been in many years.
    The idiotic immigration policies of many countries has reduced the national character and ethos of mostcountries and there is a mixing of the races until there is very little national ethos left anywhere. Morals I won't even discuss ! Want to discuss Zimbabwe - North Korea - Iran - Syria - Sudan - Phillipines ?
    Corruption is widespread - and swept under the carpet in many areas - terrorism also widespread - even pirates on the high seas - the United Nations appears to be as ineffective as the old League of Nations......

    It would appear to be failure all around - or do you think I might be a tad pessimistic ?

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by constancewinifred (U1936443) on Sunday, 25th March 2007

    More than a tad pessimistic Trooper Tom!
    I think I have replied to a message in this way once before - you lovely people did a fantastic job - sacrificed so much. Look around at our country again. Spring is here, the daffodils and primroses still flower. We are free to walk where we please (mostly!). We can speak freely. Yes, we are ethnically more tolerant than perhaps before WWII, but this is no bad thing.
    There are many problems today. Each generation seems to have it's own. But come on, it is still a pretty good country to live in.
    Thank you once again for what you and your wonderful comrades did for us.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Trooper Tom Canning - WW2 Site Helper (U519668) on Monday, 26th March 2007

    Constance Winifred - how lovely to see such old fashioned names again - makes a change from caitlin and the modern stuff which is flying around...unfortunately I don't live in your country so the sight of daffodils and primroses will be here in due course.
    I am not unduly pessimistic rather - realistic would be a better term, as from what I see , read and hear about the U.K. your politicians are deep into the New World Order syndrome and all it's machinations with Abortion - Homosex - same sex marriages - and now allowing homosexuals to adopt babies with no thought of the faith based groups which built your once great country.
    Their rush to comply with the idiotic EU immigration philosophies has brought unchecked Ghettos to many areas such as Bradford - Leicester - Nottingham - Birmingham - which ultimately brings infiltration into your forms of Government at all levels.
    With the push of one particular ethnic group for world domination is is not unduly pessimistic to realise that their predominence in child birth, and the exit of many British retirees to the sunnier climes, along with the abortion and contraceptive ways of the younger British - you are not too far from being under their Laws and all that it brings. Have you checked as to what is going on in the Sudan - Phillipines - etc ?
    It is said that France - for example - will go this way in less than 20 years- how far behind will your lovely country be ?
    We fought - and as you have said - sacrificed - to keep Great Britain - British - my point is that it would appear to be in vain - who exactly is fighting to do that to-day - just 60 years on?
    Cheers

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by ritsonvaljos (U1268437) on Monday, 26th March 2007

    Not everybody in Britain and the Comnmonwealth who took part in WW2 'fought' in the war. In a "People's War" there were many ways of serving the war effort that did not necessarily involve 'fighting'. For example there were young women who worked in the munitions or cloting factories and there were young men who were in the Merchant Navy or worked in the coal mines.

    Having interviewed a large number of people who took part in WW2 - including many who 'fought' in the war as your question asks - I would say everyone should be proud of what they did for the war effort. On the whole, most people played a part in what led to overall victory. Taking part in the 'fighting' was only one element of the whole war.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by constancewinifred (U1936443) on Tuesday, 27th March 2007

    I can see now that you don't live in the UK Trooper Tom! Don't believe all you hear and see in the press etc. It really isn't as bad as you think. I wouldn't live anywhere else. My 3 adult grown up and married children, all who have their own children, also have travelled extensively and now all live within 5 miles of where they were born and educated. We live in lovely Sussex. I know we are lucky, and who is that thanks to I wonder.
    I wonder where you live.
    Cheers!
    ps. Constance Winifred is my dear late Mum's name. She hated it!!! And was always known as Connie. My name is Pauline, and I don't like that much either!

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Palaisglide (U3102587) on Tuesday, 27th March 2007

    Dear Constancewinifred,
    People living abroad must get a funny over view of this country from the media. We have to remember to them the only news is bad news or even better sensational bad news, the good things do not get reported.
    At 78 and a boy through the war years I have only seen things get better through all those years of war then cold war right up to now.
    I live in an area of the North of England where we see very little trouble in fact our local area has not seen any in the 23 years I have lived here.
    Of course there are places I would not go at night but then there always were, even as a lad I was warned not to go into some areas, that has always been the case.
    Talking to a lot of people world wide on this machine has let me ask the question, "was it worth it" the answer is 99% yes. People ask me, who went through the cold war years in the forces was it worth it and I say yes.
    I have a grown family living in their own houses. A flock of lovely Grandchildren most who are at, or have been to University something we could not aspire to. They have never been in trouble, and enjoy all the assets of a modern world we never knew.
    Are we unique? no we are not, most of the people we know are exactly the same.
    I know where Tom is coming from as he is a good friend, usually he is "the glass is half full" type, but reading some of the media stuff leaves him feeling bucolic as it does us all. We have to remember the media is just sensation wrapped up in doom and gloom, it is not true to life.
    If we do not take it as read and find out about the good things happening you get your perspective back.
    This is by far a better world than it was and thank goodness Tom and many others like him did what was required to make it so.
    Frank.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Palaisglide (U3102587) on Tuesday, 27th March 2007

    Dear Constancewinifred,
    People living abroad must get a funny overview of this country from the media. We have to remember to the media the only news is bad news or even better sensational bad news, the good things do not get reported.
    At 78 and a boy through the war years I have only seen things get better through all those years of war then cold war right up to now.
    I live in an area of the North of England where we see very little trouble in fact our local area has not seen any in the 23 years I have lived here.
    Of course there are places I would not go at night but then there always were, even as a lad I was warned not to go into some areas, that has always been the case.
    Talking to a lot of people world wide on this machine has let me ask the question, "was it worth it" the answer is 99% yes. People ask me, who went through the cold war years in the forces was it worth it and I say yes.
    I have a grown family living in their own houses. A flock of lovely Grandchildren most who are at, or have been to University something we could not aspire to. They have never been in trouble, and enjoy all the assets of a modern world we never knew.
    Are we unique? no we are not, most of the people we know are exactly the same.
    I know where Tom is coming from as he is a good friend, usually he is "the glass is half full" type, but reading some of the media stuff leaves him feeling bucolic as it does us all. We have to remember the media is just sensation wrapped up in doom and gloom, it is not true to life.
    If we do not take it as read and find out about the good things happening you get your perspective back.
    This is by far a better world than it was and thank goodness Tom and many others like him did what was required to make it so.
    Frank.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Palaisglide (U3102587) on Tuesday, 27th March 2007

    PS,
    That is what you get when old fingers hit the button twice, repeats, I did not mean to say it again.
    Frank.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by constancewinifred (U1936443) on Wednesday, 28th March 2007

    Well said you! I absolutely agree! Don't worry about posting it twice as it made so much sense! Keep messaging!

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Trooper Tom Canning - WW2 Site Helper (U519668) on Monday, 2nd April 2007

    My Dear Pauline and Frank -
    No doubt you will be astonished to learn that I did not ask how your families were doing in the New Labour Britain but rather " who is fighting to keep Britain - British " ? No one ?
    Pauline -I live in what is known as the Beautiful - Super - Natural - British Columbia which is located at the far end of Canada - near the Pacific. As you and your family have travelled extensively then I would say that where I live in that land is on the flood plain of the Mighty River Fraser. Which was originally explored by the Forefather of the late Lord Lovatt of WW2 Commando fame - one Simon Fraser.
    This is very similar to that area of Switzerland at the far end of Lake Geneva around the Martigny - Econe area before rising to the Bernard pass and close to where the River Rhone heads North before turning and running through France to the Mediterranean.
    Regarding my ignoring the biased Media - I do and depend on my information relative to the conditions prevailing in the UK from my Brother who lives near Nottingham and my Sister who lives in Birmingham and whom I visit annually.
    The "Islam awareness weeks" in those areas are totally redundent !
    Sussex by the sea has no comparison with the Midlands as I found some two years ago when I attended a wedding in Midhurst, which I found to be the very essence of Ye olde Britain as I slept in a 300 year old Hotel - with sloping floors - a 200 year old Church and a 100 year old converted barn for the reception. Some 40 other guests flew in from Philadelphia late Friday - and flew back on the Sunday a.m. but how they managed to get their heads in the small door of the aircraft remains a mystery !
    Both yours and Frank's families are doing well - strangely - so is mine as all three followed their father through universities and are in good positions - but then I do beleive that this is in spite of governments and is more indicative of family influence ???

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Palaisglide (U3102587) on Monday, 2nd April 2007

    Tom,
    No you did not ask about our families and you did ask who is fighting to keep Britain British.
    The answer to that is self explanatory don't you think.
    Our families are doing it quietly without rancour or naked prejudice the true British way. We grit our teeth and make the best of it, that was once called the wartime spirit.
    Having lived through the many Governments since the war years and having been misruled by all of them we do find that life gets better year by year despite their worst maneuverings. Why? because we take them with a pinch of salt and do things our own way.
    I raged at the inadequate labour rule in the 70's then railed at the Thatcher years, now as is our right we are appalled at the misrule we now live under and then learn the next PM is responsible for the black hole in our children's pensions when they reach that age.
    Yet and it is a big yet we have had a raise in our living standards year by year and even now in my pension years.
    Certainly some are afraid of the immigration though the percentage of immigrants to born Britain's is so small it is hardly noticeable in most of Britain.
    Of course some areas get hit the hardest because that is where the low paid jobs are and the demand for low paid workers will draw them there.
    We who live here see the backlash beginning and as the Government rush through even more stupid laws to stop the problem they made in the first place I can see trouble coming that will cause us to be worried.
    We are basically happy go lucky people who live and let live so why fight when there is no war as yet. A small minority of hot headed youths is not Armageddon, when the time comes we will sort it in our usual way.
    Frank.

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Trooper Tom Canning - WW2 Site Helper (U519668) on Tuesday, 3rd April 2007

    Frank -
    in our many discussions on your "ill spent youth" - euphemistically called ' boxing lessons' - you failed to discuss the chapters on ow blows and yet you can deliver them like a world champion !
    "yet - and yet we have seen an increase in our living standards - even in our pension years " - ouch....
    AS you are aware since the days of Attlee - we who chose to fill the empty places of Empire - have not seen an old - or even new penny indexed to our pensions since then and my particular case - since my first pension cheque after 22nd July 1989.
    Since we have been through every court in the land for a decision it now devolves on the EU to solve this thorny question. Hopefully we will receive justice.
    All we are asking for is equality with other pensioners who chose to live in say Germany - Italy - Japan - USA - Bosnia et al and be up rated to current standards - not a hint of back pay - just current standards.We can pay our own heating bills and health services !!!
    THe bold Tony says it would cost 300 GBP millions to up rate us - so...with a surplus of some 33GBP billion in the reserve pension fund - this should not be a problem ! It costs 1.5 billion for the upkeep of yout illegal immigrants per annum, not counting the cost of their health services - and when asked to settle out of court he states Churchillian wise that he "will fight us on the beaches "
    We will allow him the benefit of choosing his beach - we choose Strasburg !

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Palaisglide (U3102587) on Tuesday, 3rd April 2007

    Tom,
    As the man said "you ain't seen nothing yet" low blows and all.
    At the boxing gym and at school we were taught the gentlemanly art of boxing, you broke cleanly on the command and stepped back, you retired to your corner when the Ref said so and you shook hands at all times.
    Then came boxing in the army where the refs needed glasses as there was some very blatant rule breaking.
    I was a quick learner and could snap in a lovely kidney punch on the refs blind side when breaking, rattle in a helping rabbit punch when they were going down on the ropes and the odd knee placed firmly would see them go through the ropes. All the time my arms would shoot up attracting the refs eye as the boot went in.
    Saturday nights in Durham with the DLI dividing the town in half with the Duke of Wellingtons saw some blood baths and more so when the civvies thought they would have some of the action. You have seen Tom no need to go into detail, we learned to fight as against box.
    Sorry to rub it in about the pensions, I too have a bug in my ear about the government pension.
    Those imbeciles at the Income tax office call my government pension "unearned income" as they cannot tax it. They then have the temerity to take it away from my other pensions thus getting their own back.
    So you see Tom I also have an axe to grind wondering how something you worked towards all your life can become unearned.
    Frank.

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by constancewinifred (U1936443) on Tuesday, 3rd April 2007

    Well chaps! At least we can now see how easy it is for politics and religion to cause wars!!!! At least our ownly ammo is our computers! I still say I am so grateful to everyone who gave so much in the WWII to give us the country in which we live in today.
    We all have an axe to grind, but we should be grateful for what we have, not what we have not.

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Palaisglide (U3102587) on Wednesday, 4th April 2007

    Dear Constancewinifred,
    The best bit is being able to talk as we do with complete freedom. We can criticise the Government or religion within reason and see it published. So many countries even today cannot do this.
    Frank.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by constancewinifred (U1936443) on Friday, 6th April 2007

    Yes, Frank you are so right! A Happy and Peaceful Easter everyone.

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by arandas (U3050038) on Friday, 6th April 2007

    Going back to the original question, those that weren't around during that time can never imagine how it felt or what life was like no matter how much we read, and we ought to be very grateful that its an experience we don't have to endure. My family are from the former Yugoslavia and suffered terribly during WW2, those who lived to tell the tale are the luckier ones. My father managed to escape from German conscription to make a better life for himself in UK. My mother was a member of the Partisans and some of the activities she tells me about is enough to make me cry. My father-in-law was a Lancaster pilot during the war and flew many missions over Germany. I am hugely proud of all of them and cannot begin to imagine what they went through. Both father and father-in-law refuse to talk about what happened although my mother is quite open about her activities (and now she says to me that she wonders why I do a dangerous job!!). I do think that its vitally important that the facts about all wars are kept alive for future generations, its crucial that those times are never forgotten and we should be grateful every day of the simple things in life that we take for granted. Personally I don't like living in UK although I fully understand why my father wanted to come here during WW2. One of my biggest issues is how the older generation in this country are treated, for all they did for us at that time and now the government lets them down so badly. Don't get me started, I could rant all day about this!!

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by constancewinifred (U1936443) on Friday, 6th April 2007

    I do so agree with what you say about the way the old folk are treated in this country. I don't have many gripes, but this is one of them, and a big one. The care of our elderly in the community and in our hospitals, is sadly lacking. And when I think of what a lot of them went through during and a little after the last war I think it is shameful. Know what I am talking about? Oh yes, my dear late,Mum, a QA from the war serving in India, and prior to that looking after pilots with terrible burns, Battle of Britain etc. (difficult to get her talk about that one) and a nurse for the rest of her life, until retirement, went through some very unpleasant times with "care in the community" and 10 weeks of very poor care in hospital and these were her last weeks. Poor love. I still cry at night when I think of how she was told off for ringing her bell for the bed pan in the night. One nurse on duty between 17 elderly patients. Disgraceful. And I was with her every day, but couldn't manage the nights as well. Now that has got me going!
    How very brave your people were arandas, we must never, never forget any of it.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by arandas (U3050038) on Saturday, 7th April 2007

    constancewinifrid. Very sorry to hear about your mum's treatment. I'm trying to resist using care homes for my parents unless its absolutely necessary. My mother is 82, has difficulty walking and is constantly in a lot of pain but her mind is as sharp as it was 60 years ago. Therefore she is able to look after my dad who suffers from dementia, cook his meals, make sure that he takes his tablets etc. I'd be really stuck on a day to day basis without her as I work full time but if anything happened to her I'd have to put dad into a home, for his safety more than anything and I'd be so worried about the care. I'm sure not all homes are like that but it would worry me sick. I get so angry and upset when I hear about old folk being abused, I just can't understand how people can do that. As we've said, these people deserve the utmost respect, they've suffered enough in their younger years as it is.

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by boabbie (U6156662) on Tuesday, 14th August 2007

    Report message21

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