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RELIGION OR SCIENCE?

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Messages: 1 - 20 of 20
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by sandra (U15631788) on Sunday, 19th May 2013

    Hi everyone,

    I would like to know everyone's views on how the world began. Do you agree with scientific theory of big bang which causes the world to begin or do you agree with religion that god created the world?

    I would like to know your views please,
    Thanks,
    Sandra smiley - smiley

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by U15730485 (U15730485) on Sunday, 19th May 2013

    There is of course a 3rd view that the Big Bang was caused by a supernatural entity.

    That entity, which we might choose to call a god, might also have been created by some higher order entity and so on.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Sasha (U15739216) on Saturday, 1st June 2013

    Personally I think science doesn't overtake religion but science can be proved and it is not like religion can't be but God isn't physically real.There can be a mixed view between religion and science with theories like the Big Bang e.g. God caused the elements to combine and form an explosion, to a creation there must be an origin or source.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Krazmaz (U2369239) on Monday, 3rd June 2013

    Religion and science are not mutually exclusive. Well, not in most cases at least; various forms of literalism nowithstanding. It would also be a question of which religion and which God.

    But that's just me.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by sandra (U15631788) on Monday, 3rd June 2013

    Wow, you guys have really good views. However, my teacher says that the universe is expanding (as the science suggests) but what is it expanding into? And if the world was created by the big bang what causes the big bang to happen? Certain particles and radiation are said to found after the big bang actually happened. It’s a mystery......

    Sandra smiley - smiley

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Krazmaz (U2369239) on Monday, 3rd June 2013

    Ultimately, we may never know. And not knowing something is perfectly okay. In fact, if anyone ever says they know something without a shadow of a doubt then you should probably take anything they say with a pinch of salt. Skepticism is healthy.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by sandra (U15631788) on Monday, 3rd June 2013

    Yep, I guess you are right smiley - smiley

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by U15747610 (U15747610) on Tuesday, 4th June 2013

    I think that evolution and the big bang theory are the most plausable. I think this because there isn't any solid evidence for the religious theories....because that's all they are...theories. Christians use the bible as solid evidence but there is no source for the bible so it could have come from anywhere. Some crazy guy on a mountain could have made it up and a massive chain of chinese whispers over the centuries has formed what is now the bible. Even if the bible is the word of God bits were possibly lost over the years, so what was the original bible is now a bunch of mis-translations.
    I realise there is no solid scientifc proof for the big band and evolution, but there is some evidence and it makes sense. There is back-ground radiation in the universe that came from the big bang...this is more commonly known as static or white noise (like when a radio isn't tuned in to a station).

    Hope I helped smiley - smiley
    Danielle

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Krazmaz (U2369239) on Tuesday, 4th June 2013

    I don't know much about the big bang or any other explanations for the origin(s) of the universe (or universes, who knows) but evolution I do know a little about, at least enough to know that it actually, demonstrably does happen.

    It is a 'theory' in the way gravity is a theory: it is seen and known to work, it is just a matter of explaining exactly how.

    But yes, absolutely certainty is anathema to science and, indeed, anathema to rational thinking. If we can't even be truly sure of what we know, the best we can hope for is reasonable certainty. Claiming to know ultimate truth is not the best way to go about things.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by sandra (U15631788) on Friday, 7th June 2013

    The science says that the universe is expanding but what is it expanding into? so if all our galaxies are moving away from us, what are they moving into?

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by PearlRaindropWriter (U15754454) on Saturday, 8th June 2013

    I think that's a very interesting question, Christians are generally split down the middle when it comes to their answer depending on their denomination. Personally, and I am a Christian, I think that the big bang theory and evolution are the most likely way 'things' happened. The creation story is very interesting but was written at a time when people had no scientific knowledge or understanding, they're had to be an explanation of how everything came to be, and at a time when religion was practically compulsory for everyone, God creating the world would be the only logical explanation. Now however, red shift has been discovered (proof that the universe is still expanding) and the big bang theory sounds more and more realistic whenever I either learn about it or revise it.

    However, the big bang was started somehow, and I like to think of it as a domino track. somebody has to set up the domino track, they set its path, its direction, and they set it off, however domino tracks can be unpredictable, you can’t change their path once the chain has been started, you can only alter it slightly, if a piece falls off track and stops the chain reaction somebody has to put that piece right and start the reaction again. I'm not saying that God has no ultimate power over us and the earth, quite the opposite, but I think God gave us free will and doesn't dictate every movement and moment of our lives, the big bang is highly plausible, more plausible than Adam and eve and the world taking 7 days to be created anyhow

    Anna smiley - smiley

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Krazmaz (U2369239) on Sunday, 9th June 2013

    The sort of Biblical literalism (or Fundamentalism, as could also be called) that has led to the Creationist movement - and the assumption that 'Seven Days' means 'Seven Days' - is roughly a hundred years old, if that.

    Before that point it was not deemed of any great import, and people discovered and investigated the natural world without trying to make what they found fit into their worldview. It's rather sad, really.

    Saint Augustine was writing about the problem of Christians making themselves look bad with unreasonable positions not backed up by evidence over a thousand years ago; someone should have paid him more attention.

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by sandra (U15631788) on Sunday, 9th June 2013

    That's a good explanation. Thanks smiley - smiley

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by U15758920 (U15758920) on Thursday, 13th June 2013

    I believe both theories to an extent. no hard evidence for this. There is more evidence suggesting that the big bang was the theory of how the world began, and Darwin's theory of Evolution, supports this. Therefore I agree with the scientific theory of the big bang as there is more hard evidence supporting this theory and it makes more sense than God created the world from nothing.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Krazmaz (U2369239) on Thursday, 13th June 2013

    A problem when it comes to arguments of this sort is that the theory of the big bang, evolution and abiogensis tend to get mashed together when, in fact, they are all distinct and seperate things. Highly important and sort-of-interelated things but thoroughly seperate all the same.

    The big bang - and theories of its ilk, I'm being broad - covers the origins of the universe in broad terms; matter, time, energy and so on. The very fabric of existence. Mind-bending stuff.

    Evolution is, as I said, a FACT and is about the variation and variety of life. I am, again, being horrendously vague but there you go.

    Abiogenesis - which is something people get confused with evolution A LOT - is about the origin of life e.g. how it started full stop (from which point evolution would have taken over).

    And then people have all these weird ideas about evolution, and Hollywood doesn't help and so on and so forth. It's a mess, basically, and I am rambling.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by BabyJackal (U15719104) on Monday, 17th June 2013

    There is a difference between believing that God created the Earth and whether this happened in 7 days or not. I think that is naive to assume that just because someone thinks that God created the Earth that they would stop investigating it. Surely if you thought that the world was created by an omnipotent God than you would be more encouraged than ever to investigate it?

    Also if someone did believe that God created the world, via the Big Bang or other theory, then it is rude to say this is an "unreasonable position". There is evidence for the Big Bang but this does not mean that it wasn't God who started it in the first place.

    I believe that God created the Universe and everything in it. I also see that there is good evidence for evolution and the Big Bang. This does not mean that they are scientific fact but they are scientifically supported theories.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

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    , in reply to message 16.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by U15765734 (U15765734) on Tuesday, 18th June 2013

    Hi everyone,

    I would like to know everyone's views on how the world began. Do you agree with scientific theory of big bang which causes the world to begin or do you agree with religion that god created the world?

    I would like to know your views please,
    Thanks,
    Sandra smiley - smiley 
    Many would say that God had created the universe, and then the world in 7 days. No one obviously knows this for sure, but it's just the story in most of the Holy Books.
    However, scientists say that the atoms reacted making the so called "The Big Bang". Then Gravity drew together large particles to make the planets. This is what some say, nonetheless, I don't know what others say about it.
    I think both in a way, because Half the things the scientist say about the atoms I don't actually believe. But I believe some of the beliefs about how the planet came to be the one we respire on, live on, excrete on etc, and the world we destroy.
    What would be your view upon this, because I would actually like to now myself, since I love astronomy.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by sandra (U15631788) on Wednesday, 19th June 2013

    Well, I think there is a link between both religion and science, I was thinking that if the world began by big bang and what caused the big bang? (could it be god who caused it) but in future if scientist find any new evidence which doesn't support the big bang theory, they might change the idea again in future. How ever, I do believe in both science and the bible.

    And yea I do love astronomy as well smiley - smiley

    Report message20

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