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which weed??

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Messages: 1 - 8 of 8
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by debanslow (U13983382) on Wednesday, 28th March 2012

    Hi,
    Ok so obviously I'm a very "green" gardener but am after a bit of weeding advice...
    How do I tell whether my "weeds" are weeds or new bulbs/perennials etc growing up again. I wonder if I might have been weeding some geraniums the other day?

    Are there any idiot proof tips?
    Thanks

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by santapup (U14659366) on Wednesday, 28th March 2012

    The definition of a weed is a plant in the wrong place-that is the saying

    You will come to recognise what is a common weed like dandelion,chickweed whatever in time-if in doubt leave it-but then again not too long or stuff will seed and you have more of a problem.

    It is a bit difficult to me more precise-it will come with experience-but if you didn't plant it and you don't want it then it is a weed

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by kate1123 (U14824475) on Wednesday, 28th March 2012

    If you take some photos and post them on the Clinic board you will probably get idents. Instructions for photos are at the top of the Clinic board.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by linda (U1797657) on Friday, 30th March 2012

    I'd definitely leave them till you're sure it's a weed i.e. plant in the wrong place. I've had some lovely surprises that either I didn't plant, or I planted elsewhere and they've spread.

    As a plantaholic I often forget where I've planted stuff so I take pictures, then I can check back to see what should be growing there

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by normaldot (U2379105) on Friday, 6th April 2012

    If you mean hardy geraniums you probably will have to weed them. Some varieties are lovely but they are just a bit too prolific. It is a pleasant job handling them because you release the scent.
    I made the mistake of planting a mixed packet of hardy geranium seed. Now I have them sprouting up everywhere, including cracks in my wall.
    You used to learn to identify weeds as part of gardening. I think if you learn to recognise the worst perennial weeds it will save a lot of work: dock, dandylion, ground elder, creeping buttercup and bindweed are my biggest workload. I like the look of bindweed, which is just as well. I think it might have been deliberately planted as all the flowers I get are white, and I have not seen any wild bindwood close by.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by lovespumpkins (U14259050) on Friday, 6th April 2012

    Learn your weeds

    Heres a helpful site :-
    www.dgsgardening.bti...

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by As-If (U15116884) on Friday, 6th April 2012

    Garden plants and weeds look very similar when they are young. Telling one from the other is just one of those things that comes with experience.
    This is true of gardening in general, you grow something this year, and next year you understand more about it.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by linda (U1797657) on Sunday, 15th April 2012

    I did the same thing with Bronze Fennel. Went away one year during the summer and it went to seed. Now it comes up everywhere and it;s about as easy to get rid of as Dandelions!

    Report message8

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