Discuss

acetate sheets?

  • Lavoisier2 on Friday, 18th June 2010

    Hi everybody,
    many TV chefs seem to use 'acetate sheets' when making chocolate decorations, e.g.:

    raymondblanc.com/Por...

    I was wondering whether these would be 'special' acetate sheets, or just the same as transparency films; and if not, where to find them.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks
    L2

  • Message 2. Posted by kari49 on Friday, 18th June 2010 permalink

    hiya you can get them in pound shops that is where ours came from, and are brill, good luck!smiley - smileykaren

  • Message 3. Posted by Denadar on Friday, 18th June 2010 permalink

    Hi kari,

    Do you use them for cooking and what size are they please - I, and lots of board members have been looking for them since the Raymond Blanc Kitchen tips, messages 305 - 309 are just some of the posts.

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    They are needed for his chocolate cups and I am dying to try them out smiley - smiley

  • Message 4. Posted by Denadar on Friday, 18th June 2010 permalink

    Hi Lavoisier2,

    As you can see I have asked Kari about the ones she mentioned, as the only place I could find sheets similar to those used by Raymond Blanc were from a wholesale specialist caterers and they were available only to professional chefs/cooks - also at £49.99 for 100 sheets they were too expensive as you had to buy the full amount, OK for a professional kitchen but goodness only knows how long it would take to use them in a domestic one.

  • Message 5. Posted by Lavoisier2 on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink

    [Kari]
    Thank you for your tip. I will see if I can find them.

    [Denadar]
    I thought of trying out those 3M transparency sheets. They might be a bit too thin, but at least they're much cheaper, I can afford to try and fail (I hope they won't release any toxic substance into the chocolate).
    Trouble is now I can't find them either! I'm sure I've seen them 1000 times: of course now I need to buy them, they've vanished.

  • Message 6. Posted by meto on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink

    I'm not sure if you're meant to use foodsafe one. I found these boxes, which, if you cut into two down two corners would give you roughly the right size. You finish up with two V shapes, although it would give you an art deco shaped cup smiley - cool www.cakecraftshop.co... Not cheap though as with P&P it'd be 45p per cup, ouch. I assume they are reusable if washed or some boxes could be used for sweeties as is.

  • Message 7. Posted by Mrs Vee on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink

    I have no idea whether this would be food-safe but it looks interesting..

    www.amazon.co.uk/gp/...

  • Message 8. Posted by juliana50 on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink

    Hi Denadar. I used to make cards as a hobby. You can buy acetate sheets from any craft shop (Hobbycraft etc) But as meto says, I have no idea whether you need special "foodsafe" sheets for your purpose. HTH

  • Message 9. Posted by Lavoisier2 on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink

    Just bought a few A4 transparency sheets. I'll give them a try.

    The sheet on Amazon looks interesting, and it's an A1 size (about 23x33 in).
    That's big enough for any chocolate cup I might attempt to make at home!

  • Message 10. Posted by Denadar on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink

    Hi everyone and thank you for your suggestions.

    I tried very hard to check whether the handicraft sheets were OK to use in the kitchen, but no one would say if they would leech chemicals into the food or not, and not wanting to poison (smiley - yikes) my friends/guests, I decided to err on the side of caution.

    I even emailed Raymond Blanc's blog (or whatever) but unfortunately no reply. Unusual because when the chocolate cups were not on the BBC food recipes I emailed him then and he sent me all the chocolate recipes.

  • Message 11. Posted by Denadar on Saturday, 19th June 2010 permalink


    I've emailed the Raymond Blanc site agsain. Keep our/my fingers crossed for an answer. smiley - smiley

    If we don't hear from you again Lavoisier, I'll take it that they are not right for food preparation smiley - laugh smiley - laugh

  • Message 12. Posted by Lavoisier2 on Sunday, 20th June 2010 permalink

    If we don't hear from you again Lavoisier, I'll take it that they are not right for food preparation

    Unless I get someone else to taste it. smiley - devil

    In fact, being a chemist I thought I'd look up cellulose acetate before risking to poison myself or other people:

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    According to this article, there are no added plasticizers, and the products of degradation of the polymer are acetic acid (the acid contained in vinegar) and cellulose (about the same as paper).
    I'm not too worried. A walk in the city centre, or eating barbecued meat, is probably much worse in terms of exposure to carcinogenic and toxic substances.

    Besides, polycarbonate moulds and containers are widely used in the food industry, despite some studies showing reproductive toxicity:

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    I'm surprised that it should be so difficult to find something chefs use on a regular basis. Especially now that there are so many shops selling professional equipment to the general public. How come I can buy blowtorches, silicone baking mats, pastry dockers, waffle irons, but not a silly acetate sheet or a rectangular frame?

  • Message 13. Posted by Denadar on Sunday, 20th June 2010 permalink



    Unless I get someone else to taste it.smiley - devil


    Great thinking smiley - winkeye

    I couldn't believe how difficult it was to get these acetate sheets either smiley - doh and when art/handicraft shops were asked they wouldn't commit themselves. Can't blame them though in today's litigious society

  • Message 14. Posted by Denadar on Monday, 21st June 2010 permalink


    I have just heard from Adam (from Raymond Blanc's Kitchen secrets" - smiley - magic smiley - bubbly - yes the gorgeous Adam that every chef (or cooksmiley - winkeye) needs.

    He said it is perfectly OK to use the acetate sheets from art shops as long as it is very thin so that it can bend easily.

  • Message 15. Posted by Reynard Dargent on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink

    Not having seen the original programme I'm coming at this with only what I've read on the thread (and my own knowledge & experience).

    If RB called for the use of an acetate sheet then I would have thought that any old acetate sheet would be fine - after all, acetate is acetate right smiley - winkeye

    If RB had said to use a sheet of foodsafe flexible plastic/film then I would say you need to track down the proper stuff from a specialist food supplier.

    As it is, acetate is acetate & I would imagine the only reason it's not billed as 'Foodsafe' is that using it in the preparation of food isn't something the manufacturers had particularly thought about. The fact that sweets and cakes are often sold in acetate packaging would be indication enough for me to assume there weren't any problems with it.

    ATB - Reynard.

  • Message 16. Posted by Stokey Sue on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink

    According to this article, there are no added plasticizers, and the products of degradation of the polymer are acetic acid (the acid contained in vinegar) and cellulose (about the same as paper).
    I'm not too worried. A walk in the city centre, or eating barbecued meat, is probably much worse in terms of exposure to carcinogenic and toxic substances.


    I used to use quite a lot of acetate sheet for overhead projector slides, and they often smelt quite strongly of acetic acid

    I can see no problem with using them for food - in fact I might see if there's a spare packet in my desk I can transfer to the kitchen!

    I don't see it as much different to wrapping food in cellophane paper (which is done by posh organic shops)

  • Message 17. Posted by uschi on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink

    You could always give the sheets a wash beforehand (make sure they are completely dry before applying the chocolate) to remove anything from the surface.

    As the chocolate isn't stored on the sheets the time of contact is fairly limited.

    I use polymer clays which take about a day to eat into other plastics, which is something acetate sheets don't do, so my guess would be that they are safe to use. I mean you won't eat choc cups every day, will you?

  • Message 18. Posted by Lavoisier2 on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink

    He said it is perfectly OK to use the acetate sheets from art shops


    Brilliant, thanks Denadar.

  • Message 19. Posted by Denadar on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink


    I was so chuffed and impressed Lavoisier, twice I have asked them a question and twice they have come back with an answer very quickly. I was also pleased to see that the brilliant A-dam is development chef to Raymond Blanc smiley - biggrin

  • Message 20. Posted by leaguer471 on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink

    Was this recipe on one of RB's Kitchen secrets programmes?

  • Message 21. Posted by Denadar on Tuesday, 22nd June 2010 permalink


    Hi leaguer,

    Yes it was one of R.B's recipes on the Kitchen secrets, here's a link

    www.bbc.co.uk/food/r...

  • Message 22. Posted by Lavoisier2 on Wednesday, 23rd June 2010 permalink

    Yes.

  • Message 23. Posted by mizzgee84 on Monday, 18th October 2010 permalink

    hi

    can i ask you please please if you could let me know if you found out what acetate sheet to use for desserts.
    I saw an episode on come dine with me where this lady used it for chocolate decorating for her cheesecake to use in a ring but everybody was eating the acetate paper??????? she did mention it was acetate sheet but they ate it so I am so confused is there a special one and where to get it from did you manage to find out?

  • Message 24. Posted by Denadar on Tuesday, 19th October 2010 permalink

    Hi mizzgee,

    I don't think you are supposed to eat it. I've never heard of acetate paper either, but then, saying that, there must be loads of things I haven't heard of.

    If you read this whole thread you will see what we found out about acetate sheets. smiley - biggrin



  • Message 25. Posted by Stokey Sue on Tuesday, 19th October 2010 permalink

    <quote>I saw an episode on come dine with me where this lady used it for chocolate decorating for her cheesecake to use in a ring but everybody was eating the acetate paper???????

    But don't you have to be daft to be on CDWM?

    Seriously - the whole point of using acetate is that it peels off clean with almost no effort, and you really aren' t supposed to eat it. I've had to peel bits of acetate off bought cakes, and I really wouldn't want it in my mouth, I think you could cut your gums on it.

  • Message 26. Posted by meto on Tuesday, 19th October 2010 permalink

    I can't imagine eating acetate either as neither do I know of it arriving in an edible paper form.

    I wonder if the contestant used rice paper, which is edible and perhaps what you saw them eating, inside the acetate which might have been used in addition to hold the shape but was itself peeled off? All I can think of not having seen the programme.

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