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How to cook like Heston

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 186
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Wokman (U3734939) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    I am looking forward to this series starting on on channel 4 tonight at 20.30 where Heston Blumenthal challenges the way Brits cook beef.

    I think it might be time to source my local supplier of liquid nitrogen and get a decent set of welding gloves to follow the series, although the things he will be showing should be able to be made at home.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Wokman (U3734939) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Sorry that should have read starting at 20.00 - 20.30.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Thanks for the heads up - I hadn't spotted it

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Alison Wright (U14267575) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    I posted a thread about it on Monday Wokman/Sue - with an info link smiley - smiley

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Wokman (U3734939) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Thats probably why some people missed it Alison as it was posted in a list of other TV programmes rather than having it's own thread.

    I didn't read your original thread about new TV food programmes as the title didn't grab my attention, but i'm sure there will be enough foodies watching it tonight to start a debate about Heston's methods.

    I like his eccentric ways and think he is as mad as a genius, certainly looking forward to it tonight.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by karadekoolaid (U5605528) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    I also love watching Heston produce wonderful dishes. I have to admit, I´ve only actually tried out two of his recipes - his confit tomatoes are just spectacularly good! -but I think the "clue", if there is one, is his extreme attention to detail. I religously followed every single step and the results were fantastic.
    BUT - it took ages!

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    I enjoyed it, though the pudding & the burger we'd sort of seen before, and it did feel a bit like his top tip for the steak was to buy one you can't afford smiley - winkeye

    I will watch the others in the series, & I will try the steal flipping technique - it does seem a genuine attempt to make Heston user friendly

    The only dish of his in my regular repertoire is his version of poached pears in red wine which was a hit at Christmas

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    Years ago bought my son "The Big Fat Duck cookbook" for Christmas 2008 (I've just seen the price on Amazon smiley - doh) I managed to keep it for a few months until he demanded his present smiley - winkeye. He swears by it, but like you KKA he actually does follow the recipe religiously too, and as has been said, the results are fantastic.

    I have recorded the programme and look forward to seeing it - don't know what type of steak he uses yet, but I only have steak once, maybe twice, a year so do buy really good (expensive?) ones. Never, ever fillet steak though. I see some branches of Asda are selling Wagyu beef, wonder what that steak is like. I don't know how much they are selling it for but I think I'll give this one a miss smiley - yikes
    www.finefoodspeciali...

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    Hi Denadar and everyone,

    Was looking forward to the programme, thanks to Alison Wright having alerted me to it (for which I thank you Alison). It was enjoyable but as has already been written, I think the aim may be to make Heston more 'user friendly'. I admit to being a little disappointed as I was hoping he would venture into sous-vide cooking but I shall continue to follow the series nevertheless.

    And I saw my local butcher too - it's always good seeing Cathal ('Jack') though I regret that he spends more time in London now than Brussels (perhaps that might change following the 'French fillet' incident - but somehow I doubt it smiley - winkeye).

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by mummyfoo (U9651297) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    I'm not a massive Heston fan really, I tend to watch for entertainment purposes rather than actual cooking tips.

    Last night's programme sort of confirmed that view - far too much faffing around for my liking!

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by EG (U15000607) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    I agree. I think there is too much talking and not enough cooking. I was intrigued by his burgers and was looking forward to hearing more. Then he produced the skirt steak, salted, left for four hours and then minced fresh and
    wrapped. Sorry Heston - we all don't have a mincer at home. Think I would follow any of the other four guys versions first !

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by ORTHO (U12217921) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    I am looking forward to this series starting on on channel 4 tonight at 20.30 where Heston Blumenthal challenges the way Brits cook beef.

    I think it might be time to source my local supplier of liquid nitrogen and get a decent set of welding gloves to follow the series, although the things he will be showing should be able to be made at home.

     
    I suggest you practice the following ...

    "Officer, you have found a syringe in my pocket because I'm on my way home to make an Oxtail Pudding"...

    Please let us know how you get on........


    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Friday, 6th January 2012


    Hi mummyfoo,

    I really love "faffing around", it is part of the pleasure in cooking for me, and I believe it is for some other posters - hence Lou's comments on the Christmas triumphs thread.
    My key triumph was deboning a turkey for the first time ever, using just a picture guide from the internet. I was madly pleased with myself, especially as I panicked a quarter of the way through and thought I would need joint is and cook it in pieces. 

    I have just bought a new boning knife and am now going to try my hand at the boned and stuffed duck - shown by Michel Roux on his "Classics" programme - though using a recipe from Keith Floyd in his Floyd on France book (an easier stuffing and less time consuming!).

    Saying how much I enjoy"faffing" around though, I think Heston's Black forest gateaux is a step too far for me.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Friday, 6th January 2012


    Hi Ortho,

    You can get them (syringes) from Boots, I know this because smiley - whistle .......... I have a recipe for Vodkas injected cherry tomatoes. A very amusing amuse bouche smiley - winkeye.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Scalywitch (U2366427) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    Hi Denadar, I too am a serial faffersmiley - biggrin!!!

    I have a mincer too and am not richsmiley - winkeyegot an old hand operated one off Ebay for a tenner which serviced me until I was gifted one for my kenwood chef. My mum bless her was as poor as a church mouse but she had a mincer too they can save you loads of money in the long run as they are so useful for mincing up leftover roast meat for shepherds or cottage pie. So would highly recommend investing in one. I have made homemade burgers for years with mine but may have to try his technique, possibly not with sirloin though!

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by EG (U15000607) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    You just reminded me that my mother had one also and is probably in storage
    somewhere ! I must go hunting.

    Was your ebay one just the manual type one ? My mothers was but I only remember her using it to make an apple cider so not sure if the manual one
    would be good enough for beef ?

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    Hi Denadar,

    Faffing about in the kitchen - there's nothing better IMO smiley - biggrin

    Last night I faffed a magret in the waterbath. Cooked to 'medium' perfection and served with a roasted fig in a jus made with a very little foie gras fat and some portwine plus a potato and broccoli gratin. Wonderful! If anyone had told me I'd be cooking 'sous vide' a year ago, I'd have told them they were crackers!

    Returning to Hestons's beef - even though from now on I will always cook beef 'sous vide', for anyone cooking on a hob his tip about leaving the beef in the fridge for 48 hours before cooking to dry age and thus concentrate the flavour makes perfect sense!. As does his tip to turn a steak every 15 seconds and it's so easy to do - you don't even need a blow torch smiley - winkeye The hamburger was fascinating and if I was into making hamburgers (which I'm not) I'd certainly give his method a try.

    So glad your got your knife - got mine too though with the festivities I've not had much time to do any more boning yet.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    Valid point Scalywitch - in the impoverished '50s a mincer (the manual type that clamped onto the edge of the kitchen table) was about the only piece of kitchen equipment that most households had - that way every scrap of leftover meat could be used up in some form of scrap pie.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Scalywitch (U2366427) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    Like this one,

    www.ebay.co.uk/itm/M...

    Good old things they are, even in a power cut lol.x

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    I agree. I think there is too much talking and not enough cooking. I was intrigued by his burgers and was looking forward to hearing more. Then he produced the skirt steak, salted, left for four hours and then minced fresh and
    wrapped. Sorry Heston - we all don't have a mincer at home. Think I would follow any of the other four guys versions first ! 
    I don't have a mincer either, and I'm not sure I know anyone who has one in working order (I know a lot who have Mum's under the sink or in the cellar I suspect)

    However, he is showing you how to cook in a different, non-standard, manner - that is the point of the program - and if he has to limit himself to the most basic kitchen implements he can't do that

    Why do people always think that paying attention to detail is "faffing"? He's cheating - he's doing it properly!

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    Why do people always think that paying attention to detail is "faffing" 

    Hi Stokey Sue, I mentioned "faffing" in reply to a post which used this expression, as did, I think, scalywitch and Blue Doyenne.

    I have a mincer in working order and though I don't use it that often, it is used. It is very useful for the base of some meat terrines such as Valentine Warner's Rabbit and pickled walnut terrine.
    www.guardian.co.uk/l.... Although he used a food processor (even though stipulating not too smooth) for chopping the rabbit and pork I find the texture of the meat when minced is better.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by mummyfoo (U9651297) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    It was me who mentioned 'faffing' - for what its worth, I also love pottering in the kitchen and making (hopefully) good food - witness my day long attempt at a shelffish bisque on Christmas Eve which took me the whole day! I also like to think I keep an attention to detail during my cooking processes...

    I watched Heston doing the oxtail and veal kidney suet puds, for example, and I felt he turned this rather simple dish into a labour-intensive (and not very practical for the average viewer) end product. As I say, televisual entertainment - which is fine.

    (I also dislike his man-handling of foodstuffs and find that a bit of turn-off.)



    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 6th January 2012

    As a food processor fan, I don't have a mincer

    I know it does some things better, but I'd use it so little it wouldn't justify cupboard space here, and Maggie the Magimix is permanently set up in the corner

    Heston's burgers are about the only dish I have seen that I can't do with Magimix and/or mezzaluna (two handled chopping knife)

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Saturday, 7th January 2012

    Me neither - and as I'm not a big fan or hamburgers and don't make my own sausages, I don't think I'll be buying one, but I did enjoy learning the reasoning on which he based his method - that was very interesting.

    As an aside, I've read good reviews of his book 'Heston Blumenthal at Home' and have ordered it. I know there are one or two recipes in it which may be too 'way out' but I've read there are many others that are accessible and apparently he goes into the reasons behind all of his methods which is what I'm most interested in.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Saturday, 7th January 2012

    Hi Blue Doyenne,

    I've been toying with the idea of buying it, can you let me know what you think of it when you get it please. Thanks.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by mark111757 (U14776024) on Saturday, 7th January 2012

    i enjoyed the first episode very much.....learned alot especially about doing steaks.....and it was not hard to do IMHO....looking forward to more from heston and the fab baker brothers!!!

    cheers from the states!!!

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    "Hi Blue Doyenne,

    I've been toying with the idea of buying it, can you let me know what you think of it when you get it please. Thanks."

    My pleasure - will do Denadar

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    Hi Blue Doyenne,

    I think you will be over the moon smiley - winkeye My son finally got around to telling me yesterday that he got it as a Christmas present and he absolutely adores it - he said "treat yourself Mum" smiley - laugh - he knows how much I need another cook book.

    I have decided to give away some books I never use to make room for ones I will, the first one is "Jamie at Home", I have only ever just looked at it (I realised it was a mistake when I bought it) - never used it. Haven't made up my mind about any others yet.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by emerald7 (U7602680) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    Hi Blue Doyenne,

    I've been toying with the idea of buying it, can you let me know what you think of it when you get it please. Thanks. 
    Hi

    I got the book a few days ago, and absolutely love it. It's beautifully presented and well written, and there are lots of recipes that are quite achievable by the home cook. My copy will be very well used.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    Hi emerald7, if I remember correctly it was your mention of the book on the 'other side' that got me curious enough to look for reviews.

    So thank you - I'm really looking forward to reading it.

    denise

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    "treat yourself Mum"

    Denadar - my sentiments exactly smiley - laugh

    On a more general note concerning the book, would love to hear what your son and emerald7 have cooked from the book. Will do the same when I receive my copy.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by emerald7 (U7602680) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    "treat yourself Mum"

    Denadar - my sentiments exactly smiley - laugh

    On a more general note concerning the book, would love to hear what your son and emerald7 have cooked from the book. Will do the same when I receive my copy. 
    Hi Denise

    So far, just the roast potatoes, and the salmon with Bois Boudran sauce – it was the latter that I saw on an eGullet thread, which inspired me to buy the book. It was fabulous, and will definitely be repeated:

    forums.egullet.org/i...

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Monday, 9th January 2012

    Thank you emerald7 - have read the thread and bookmarked it so that I can learn how other cooks are experiencing his dishes too.

    denise

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Fruitcake (U1141715) on Monday, 9th January 2012

    My friend got 'Heston at Home' for Christmas and he cooked the mushroom jelly/parfait/cream starter for a dinner party at the weekend. Unfortunately I wasn't invited (charming!!) but he showed me a picture of the finished dish and it did look superb. He said although it took 3 days it was the best thing he had ever cooked (because it was lovely but also so exciting to be trying something different) and would definitely be doing it again as it was would be easier now he knew what he was doing.

    Not to feel left out he's doing the scallop tartare with white chocolate foam and prawn oil for me this week. smiley - smiley

    I've had a flick through the book and the two dishes that stood out as ones I really want to try are schezuan broth with duck dumpling, and the crab lasagne. Will be borrowing the book to give those a go soon I think!

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Wednesday, 11th January 2012

    I think he's on "This Morning" starting about now. smiley - smiley

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Scalywitch (U2366427) on Wednesday, 11th January 2012

    I cooked my steak (rib eye) the other day like he described, I hadn't had time to do the drying out but had left them out to get to room temp. I have to say I was dubious about turning them so frequently after so many years of just the once BUT the steaks were gorgeous, much more evenly cooked (rare) and the crust was wonderful, I shall continue to do them this way and will try the drying out next time too.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Wokman (U3734939) on Wednesday, 11th January 2012

    I am looking forward to tonights episode about eggs, we did make the oxtail and liver pies with our own variations.

    I will get back to that and let you know what we did with his recipe within the next few days.

    I can promise you that the results were fantastic.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Thursday, 12th January 2012

    Hi Wokman,

    I love the way Heston cooked his eggs, they looked just the way I like them, white just set and the yolk runny. What wonderfully orange the yokes were too, wonder whether it is the breed of chicken he has or what he feeds them> I loved the look of the raggedy headed chicken, a real rock and roller.

    The dry ice ice-cream would be a good idea for a party too, not necessarily egg and bacon flavoured smiley - winkeye

    As you made his oxtail pies you might be interested in this
    www.lovefood.com/...

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Friday, 13th January 2012

    I'm really loving this programme!
    Eggs, so simple and wonderful and yet he takes their cooking to the level of perfection. What I'm finding most of all is that everything makes sense.
    I can't wait to see what I'll learn about chocolate.

    Not so sure about the bacon and egg ice cream though (sorry Heston).

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 13th January 2012

    That lemon tart looked just wonderful

    I'd love it have a go - but not sure what I'd do with 12 portions (other than increase my waistline)

    interesting way of sealing the pastry case - definitely one to try
    www.channel4.com/4fo...

    I'd love to try the bacon and egg ice cream - when I was younger canapes filled with (cold) soft scrambled egg with bits of crispy bacon or smoked salmon were quite popular, not so very different

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Friday, 13th January 2012

    By some magical coincidence the book I ordered, 'Heston Blumenthal at Home' has just arrived and it looks like one serious read.
    So I'm off to a quiet corner .... page 396 'Using this book' seems like a good place to start.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Friday, 13th January 2012

    Hi Blue Doyenne,

    It is, to me too, the most brilliant of programmes, as you say when he explains his methods it makes perfect sense, even down to using coins instead of baking beans. The use of the heat sensor thingy showing how more heat was given off by the coins so helping to cook the pastry from the top, genius.

    I had egg and bacon ice cream at the Fat Duck, I can remember being very pleasantly surprised that I really liked it but cannot for the life of me remember what it tasted like.

    It seems that once you have actually tried (and eaten) any of his recipes you become a convert smiley - smiley smiley - ok - USUALLY - bound to be some who don't.smiley - winkeye

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Friday, 13th January 2012

    "I had egg and bacon ice cream at the Fat Duck"

    Dena, I am seriously in awe - I've never eaten in any Michelin-starred restaurant. One day perhaps ......

    And the book is fantastic, your son was right - you'll love it.

    Stokey Sue - I followed the link you posted and I see what you mean ... 'liquid pastry' . The lemon tart recipe is in the book and strangely enough there's no mention of sealing the pastry base at all - he just sticks it back in the oven for 10 minutes after removing the coins/beans.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 13th January 2012

    I even wondered if one could cheat a little (sorry HB) and use the egg white leftover from making the pastry instead of an additional egg for the liquid pastry

    I might try it next time I bake anything blind

    And just the tip to scrunch the paper 8 times is a good one I think - far more than I have ever done

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by irishcountry-cousin (U4046489) on Saturday, 14th January 2012

    I am going to try the six minute (non) boiled egg. I makes so much sense to take it off the heat and let it cook in the residual heat. But 15 mins for scrambled eggs.......... a wait too long, I think.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Thursday, 19th January 2012

    Wow - I am absolutely loving this programme. i have just watched the chocolate episode (I record it so that I don't miss it smiley - winkeye) and I want to make the exploding chocolate cake and the flowerpot tiramisu and the hot chocolate and.... and ......

    I am today ordering the book Blue Doyenne and Emerald, can't wait to get it.

    Happy days will soon be here smiley - biggrin

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by Bluedoyenne (U2341157) on Thursday, 19th January 2012

    " am today ordering the book Blue Doyenne and Emerald, can't wait to get it."

    I'm surprised you've waited this long ...... I just know you'll love it smiley - biggrin

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Wokman (U3734939) on Saturday, 21st January 2012

    Hi Denadar,

    Thanks for the link, but I don't do much in the way of cookery competitions these days. The last one I took part in was the Great British Barbeque competition where I came second in the South Wales heat.
    Having said that I did once win the egg and spoon race smiley - laugh

    With Heston's pies we changed the suet pastry for shortcrust and added steak and kidney as well as the oxtail.
    Then we made some more pies a few days later with suet pastry and left out the oxtail. Both recipes were made using the basic pie mix that Heston made.
    I preferred the pies made with the shortcrust pastry as I am not a big suet fan, however both methods were perfect.

    I also tried his 6 min soft boiled egg method and after placing in it in the egg cup I took the top off (with the dexterity and precision, the likes which have not been seen since the days of the ancient Samuria warrior), to reveal the perfect HARD boiled egg.

    I will have to try that one again and adjust the timing as my pans hold a lot of heat ages after they have been taken off the hob, so I suspect the egg just carried on cooking rather than cooling down in the residual heat.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Saturday, 21st January 2012

    Hi Wokman,

    I too had a perfect hard boiled egg smiley - erm - My pans also have very thick bottoms - I didn't think of that being maybe a reason

    Sorry you are not entering, I'd love to be able to say "Well of course I know the winner doncherknow" smiley - winkeye

    I haven't made a meat pie for ages but maybe will try now.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Simon Barton (U14283743) on Saturday, 21st January 2012

    I made the Oxtail pie in the week. It's the first time I have ever made my own pastry but the it sounded so good on the programme that I was inspired to give it a go and I certainly wasn't disappointed and I will be making it again without a doubt.
    I haven't tried any of his egg methods yet but am interested to give them a go as well as his technique for cooking steak.

    I'm really enjoying the series.

    Report message50

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