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What do our kitchens say about us?

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Messages: 1 - 12 of 12
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Ramona Andrews BBC Food host (U14570541) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    "Hopefully we're becoming less obsessed with the idea that where we live should be a monetary investment above all else. Maybe we can relax a little. We're stuck with our kitchens for a while and so we can let our hair down a bit. We don't have to worry what an estate agent will think if they come round and see that we've painted our kitchen Berocca and pink." Says Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen on the blog. What do you think?

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Ramona Andrews BBC Food host (U14570541) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    Helps if I add a link... www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by George (U2217669) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    I'm just putting the finishing touches to our kitchen/diner. It's what we want and it suits us fine. It's fairly practical - good quality laminate work surfaces with a stainless steel sink - good vinyl on the kitchen floor and carpet on the dining end. Solid maple doors on the cabinets and a cream rangemaster cooker.

    We did take the opportunity to get plenty of electrical sockets and low voltage under cabinet lighting installed.

    Overall - NOT a showhouse specimen, but very functional and cosy. I do however wish it was larger.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Denadar (U8017493) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    I'm half way through having a new kitchen fitted, not a fantastic one as it is a very small galley type. I so agree with Capt-Lightning - but without the cosy bit smiley - laugh
    Overall - NOT a showhouse specimen, but very functional and cosy. I do however wish it was larger 

    I had a choice, enlarge the kitchen by connecting it with the dining room and using it as a kitchen/diner or keep it as it is with my separate dining room (which I love). I suppose it does say a little about me as I love entertaining and like having a room given over to just dining with all the paraphernalia of producing the food kept very separate.

    This is one of the few times I am not absolutely "with" Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen. OTT he might be but (apart from a few times in Changing Rooms) I really like his designs.

    If I had a large enough house to have a kitchen/breakfast room with separate dining and sitting rooms I might go long with his ideas. My dining room is a gorgeous raspberry colour so I go along with the pink but what is berocca, apart from a vitamin supplement?

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by meto (U14090385) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    I like ergonmic, especially in a small kitchen and as mentioned by CaptLightning, with more sockets than you could shake a stick at (with suitable fuse box to suit, not "spurs off" an existing ring main).

    He (LLB) has a point about not needing to persuade property valuers if not intending to sell any time soon; seemingly Ann Maurice, the House Doctor, although minimalising houses to be sold actually has her own full of clutter, i.e. it is very much personalised, as shown on a TV prog.

    A kitchen, given a choice, is what you want it to be. IIRC fitted kitchens arrived as early as 1920 's (Bauhaus era), even lighting fitments. (Halogen spots cost a fortune to run.)

    What do our kitchens say about us? Rather depends what one has to work with and what expenditure can be allocated to improving or making it suit. 1930's-built houses have tiny kitchens as do modern houses/flats. The biggest kitchens I know of are those usually council properties built in the 1970's.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by George (U2217669) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    If I'm asked how big my house is, I describe it as 'adequate' (I suppose it's about 140 sq. mtr.) I get a feeling that it has been altered a lot in its (almost 200 year) lifetime, and I'm not even 100% sure what room was originally the kitchen.

    I don't tend to entertain at home, but when family visit, I can comfortably seat 6 round the table. What does my kitchen say about me - it says here's a guy who likes solid, practical, good quality things - fads and fashions are not top of my list.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by sesley (U4024157) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    i think you should have a kitchen that you want and need,not what a estate agent thinks would sell.In my kitchen which was done last December,i have a pieace of black granite inlaid to my wooden work tops,for rolling out pastry,i also have my microwave fitted under my hob,because its safer to bend you knees than reaching above a oven for stuff that will be boiling hot,since i am a short arse as well,so i have to have a kick stool about to reach top shelves and cupboards. I love my kitchen,I have the washing up area away from my cooking area,,its been well planned out. plus a red glass splash back behind my hob,because i like red.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    Why is there a blog if all the comments are on the forums? Only one comment has been made on the blog, everything else is on here, which happens quite often, so what is the point of the blog? I'm not implying there should only be one or the other, but really, what is the point?

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by sesley (U4024157) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    maybe because most people read here rather than a blog,since the question was set for here,i don't really know what my kitchen says about me,i think its stylish,don't know if i am,though i do seem to have expensive tastes in that what i like seems to have a heafty price tag to it,either cooking pots or knives or appliances. I don't ;ike cheap kitchen stuff you buy in the pound shops.I think for me its much better to save for good quality stuff that looks good in 10 years time.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by MinnesotaMaven (U14037247) on Tuesday, 30th August 2011

    This time in 2009 we were just starting to tear out the old kitchen. Awkward, L shaped, with a useless breakfast room. this is what we have now
    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...
    Life is much easier with the new kitchen, we use the breakfast bar every day.
    We remodeled the kitchen for US, not some imaginary estate agent(although it helps that the Huz is a real estate broker).
    Our 2 bathrooms are decorated in what I refer to as "updated 30s/40s style". One has the original mauve and black tile (with 30s ish Chinese wallpaper) and the upstairs bath has black/grey and white tile with RED walls and wild/stylish red wallpaper with giant lotus flowers. www.romo.com/collect... ....Definitely not decorating for someone else!!

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Ramona Andrews BBC Food host (U14570541) on Wednesday, 31st August 2011

    Why is there a blog if all the comments are on the forums? Only one comment has been made on the blog, everything else is on here, which happens quite often, so what is the point of the blog? I'm not implying there should only be one or the other, but really, what is the point?
     
    You are welcome to leave comments in either space. The blog is a more public area for comments (it’s linked from the BBC Food homepage and relevant programme websites) and is much more findable throughout the BBC websites, so is more likely to been seen by those who don’t usually comment on BBC social platforms. However, many of you have been using the messageboard for many years and feel more secure responding here.

    As much as it would be fantastic to truly integrate the messageboard and blog, unfortunately we don't have the resource to do that, so we need to publish features like Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen’s post on the BBC Food blog rather than the messageboard (as the messageboard platform doesn’t provide features like images, linking text and ‘findability’), while the messageboard continues to be a well-loved space for discussion. I would hope that you might comment on the blog so that all the discussion is focussed in one place, but it's clear that many of you feel more comfortable commenting here.

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Wednesday, 31st August 2011

    I am hoping the over-fitted kitchen will die a death

    12 years ago I was looking for a new flat to buy

    All the kitchens I saw that had been fitted up to sell had been fitted with "seamless" cabinets to look sleek - you couldn't add another thing. Which was a shame as they had all been done on the cheap and lacked the following

    An oven large enough to cook in
    A decent hob
    A dishwasher or even the space to put one
    Anywhere to put the rubbish bin. This was in a little unhygienic dump in the middle of the room with the towels (no towel rail as no gaps between the units) and the cat bowl (if cat present)

    My kitchen I like the style of (vaguely Shaker), the look is fine, I do wish there was room for a breakfast bar or a table though.

    I've always hated the glossy featureless cabinet look - it's not "homely" , it's not practical (sticky finger marks). oddly it always looks untidy as two mugs and a teaspoon left out spoil the all important look, and I possibly dislike it particularly as I worked in labs for years and I can't stand kitchen fittings that look as if they should be in a lab or even a mortuary. I won't even have a stainless steel sink!

    Report message12

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