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Scotch Eggs

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Messages: 1 - 43 of 43
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Alison Wright (U14267575) on Thursday, 28th July 2011

    After my OH had a cholesterol scare a couple of years ago I've tried to keep a close eye on what I cook for him. He's accepted the changes I've made without complaint & with diet & meds. his levels are back to normal.

    However, there are times when I know he craves the food of his youth, & in his case it's Scotch eggs, which I've promised to make for him soon. But in all my years cooking - I've never made them. I can't even recall a Scotch egg thread on this board before.

    So does anyone still make them & can pass on any tips, hints, do's & donts?
    TIA
    Alison

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Hi Alison

    Scotch eggs haven’t been a topic for quite a while. I don’t know if the packet veggie sausage mixes are lower in cholesterol than real sausage meat (I suspect they are) but I have made pretty passable scotch eggs with them.

    If you/he doesn’t fancy the veggie mix then either buy the best sausagemeat you can lay your hands on, de-skin your favourite premium sausages or, for a lower cholesterol version, make your own “sausagemeat” from minced turkey like in this one: www.food.com/recipe/... But if your chap longs for a Scotch egg, then I really don’t think that a “real” one made in the traditional way as a special treat will do much harm especially if you balance the rest of the day’s food accordingly.

    I don’t deep fry either – just breadcrumb (I love panko breadcrumbs – really crunchy) & bake. A little mist of oil over prior to baking is a good idea.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Joanbunting (U14658764) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Morning Alison

    Well done both of you - he deserves a treat and after all the latest pronouncement says eggs are not badies ant more.! What they will say next week is another matter, so make them quick!

    I do make Scotch Eggs now and again because M and the GCs are fond of them.

    The children love mini ones made with quails eggs.

    I use very fresh small eggs - easier to handle, Good quality sauasge meat, or as Dee said "undressed" sausages. I mash it up and add fresh chopped herbs and sometimes a little finely chopped onion, softened in a little oil. This needs to be seasoned very well, a dash of Lee and Perrins or a little Dijon mustard helps.

    Pat the sausage mixture out into rounds on a dampened board then wrap it around the eggs, making sure you seel the join.

    Roll in seasoned flour and dip into beaten egg before rolling in breadcrumbs - actually use fresh white ones. I do deep fry simply because they taste nicer.
    Dee suggestion for using brownerd crumbs and baking them is good alternative.

    Actually if your oil is hot enough however should not absorb too much especially if you drain them thoroughly on kitchen paper.

    I hope you both enjoy them and remember "A little of what you fancy....."

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by bellehelene (U14831087) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    I used S@insburys venison sausages to de-skin for quail scotch eggs. I believe venison is cholesterol free so maybe your OH could be ok with them. I have also made smoked salmon forcemeat scotch eggs too as I had non meat eating guest at my Burns night dinner last year.

    If you prefer a runny egg you can soft boil, peel and then freeze them. Wrap the coating around bread up and then cook and serve straight away. Quails eggs are a bit fiddlely to peel but worth it.

    I seal in a deep fat frier then finish in the oven which helps to render most of the fat out.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Scalywitch (U2366427) ** on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Hi, I personally don't like them however my OH loves them he had one from here and it was probably the best he has ever had, great place to eat if you are in Suffolk too.

    www.britishlarder.co...

    You may need to make changes to your local produce available however the method should be the same, just scroll down for the recipe.x

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Joanbunting (U14658764) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Morning BH

    I wonder if merguez would work?

    Like the sound of the smoked salmon.

    Re quails eggs , they are, as you say, fiddly though worth it but did you know that here you can buy ready peeled ones smiley - biggrin at a price ?

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by mischievousRealRo (U14035913) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    After my OH had a cholesterol scare a couple of years ago I've tried to keep a close eye on what I cook for him. He's accepted the changes I've made without complaint & with diet & meds. his levels are back to normal.

    However, there are times when I know he craves the food of his youth, & in his case it's Scotch eggs, which I've promised to make for him soon. But in all my years cooking - I've never made them. I can't even recall a Scotch egg thread on this board before.

    So does anyone still make them & can pass on any tips, hints, do's & donts?
    TIA
    Alison  
    www.bbc.co.uk/food/r...

    www.bbc.co.uk/food/r...

    I have made both of these and they were scoffed very quickly! HTH

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by kari49 (U12195831) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    hiya alison and rosmiley - hug there hasn,t been a scotch egg thread for a while, when i used to make them, i used to use cumberland sausage meat to encase the eggs and then breadcrumb them but now i would go down the panko breadcrumb route, i alwys baked them as i am not a big fried food eater, and made a tomato sauce to go with it good luck!smiley - smileykaren

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by bellehelene (U14831087) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Hi Joan.

    Oh yes merguez. Good call.

    The ready peeled quail eggs, would they be soft boiled as they are REALY fiddly!Just as much how to spell fiddly, I oops myself before the self appointed spelling 'harbour sharks' pick it up! smiley - whistle

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    You can buy hte ready peeled quail eggs in quite a lot of UK supermarkets, but they are quite firm all the way through

    Just one hint - lightly flouring the peeled eggs makes the sausage stick better

    And here are more varieties of Scotch eggs than I ever thought possible:

    www.handmadescotcheg...

    The black pudding one is devine

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Joanbunting (U14658764) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Good Gracious Sue

    Who would have thought it?

    I hope Alison's husband doesn't get to see the site smiley - laugh

    I must try black pudding, but boudin noire (black pudding) are quite soft. On the other hand ........ boudin blanc??????

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    I'v e had some from that company Sue, they're great!
    Also gives good ideas for making different ones at home.

    I forgot to say about flouring the eggs it does help.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by tulip (U14755128) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    I often used to make scotch eggs years ago but have become very health concious lately. I love the sound of the smoked salmon forcemeat, any tips on how to do that? The black pudding sounds great too.
    I must say I always have great difficulty in peeling soft boiled eggs.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by bellehelene (U14831087) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Hi Tulip.

    The best way to peel eggs is to once cooked put in cold water and crack the eggs and let them stand until cooled down. The water gets between the membrane and egg so making it much easier to peel, best under a running tap.

    For the smoked forcemeat it is smoked salmon, a little fresh salmon too, pulsed with a few white bread crumbs, lemon rind, egg and seasoning. Herbs like parsley, chives or dill adds little flecks of colour. Add fresh cream to bind but not too much or it will take to the egg.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Alison Wright (U14267575) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Afternoon all,

    Great replies from everyone - & some lovely ideas on the links - thankyou.

    No I won't be showing him the website with 40 different varieties - as I know he'd be placing an order!

    I wasn't concerned about the eggs, more so the fat in the sausage & the deep-frying. But as you say Joan, he deserves a treat.

    I think the idea of baking is a good one - I'm going to give that a go, if that doesn't float his boat - I'll get the chip-pan out! but I don't think he'd thank me for using quail eggs though!

    Thinking back, when growing up, my Mum used to make them for us using my Dad's little 'banty' eggs which were just the right size for little'uns, pity you can't buy little eggs these days.


    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Joanbunting (U14658764) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Hi Alison

    Banty eggs. My gran used to keep bantams - when i wa little i thought they were magical birds.

    I used to be able to buy banty eggs in the Grainger market and i can get poulets eggs here.

    Anyway you two enjoy them!

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Lokelani (U8896212) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    I always bake mine, more than enough fat oozes out of the sausagemeat to make them naughty enough for my liking.

    Sometimes I use sausagemeat & sometimes sausages & just take out of the skins, each one makes a nice size egg I find.

    I chop the egg, which I aim for slightly soft hard boiled if that makes sense. I always get in a right sticky mess making them, but find them well worth it when I do. They're just so good hot or cold.

    I wonder if they freeze well does anyone know? That's something I've never tried.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Alison Wright (U14267575) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    Lokelani,

    I'm a bit iffy about bought sausagemeat - as you don't really know what's in it. Even when I make stuffings I use good quality sausages with a high meat content, which is what I'll use for the Scotch eggs.

    I wondered about freezing too, I have a feeling the white part of the egg may discolour. Re - freezing stuff - I tend to work on the premise if frozen food manufacturers dont make & sell them - it mightn't be a viable proposition.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by BakerPhil (U14104290) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    I've thought of making scotch eggs in work but as we dont have a deep fat fryer, I was wondering if they would come out ok if they where cooked in the oven,

    I think I might just try a sausage mix in a loaf tin with eggs through it and then serve in slices

    Bp

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Alison Wright (U14267575) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    That sounds like a good idea Phil, reminds me of the Grosvenor pie with the pastry around, be nice for a picnic, my OH would love it!

    Quite a few posters seem to bake them, that's what I'll try first before getting the chip-pan out.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Pet (U14937760) on Friday, 29th July 2011

    I bake them too, when I deep fried them a lot of fat from the sausagemeat leaked out and contaminated the oil in the fat fryer so I've always baked on a rack over a roasting tin since.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Monday, 1st August 2011

    I'm a bit iffy about bought sausagemeat - as you don't really know what's in it. Even when I make stuffings I use good quality sausages with a high meat content, which is what I'll use for the Scotch eggs.
     


    Don't really understand that

    Sausagemeat from a half decent butcher (or a decent brand from asupermarket) will have the same content as the skin-on sausages from the same source, surely? That's my experience

    I'd be very angry with my butcher if he gave me a lesser product because he wasn't stuffing it into skins - and he woudln't anyway, he'd consider it a bizaree thign to do.

    And if you read the label on a supermarket brand, the meat content is usually stated

    The main trouble is actually gettign hold of sausagemeat, other than at Christma

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by meto (U14090385) on Monday, 1st August 2011

    Replying generally. Do they put rusk (bread) into the sausage meat for Scotch eggs?

    I ask because I let myself down when giving up meat by eating one without even realising that the outer was in fact meat.smiley - biggrin

    Bread would make sense regarding fat coming out given what's often left in a frying pan. There used to be Porkinson (brand name) sausages on the shelf at Sainsbury & elsewhere which seemed to exude less fat, so perhaps it could alternatively be a case of learning which is best for Scotch eggs.

    PS: A spot of curry powder in the meat instead of herbs works well.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Joanbunting (U14658764) on Monday, 1st August 2011

    Afternoon Sue

    "The main trouble is actually gettign hold of sausagemeat, other than at Christma"

    It is not a problem here because all good butchers sell what they can "farce" (stuffing) which is, in fact really good sausage meat. You can usually get a plain one, a herb one and a spicy one. It makes really good Scotch eggs.

    I do have my grandmother's sausage meat recipe (she was from a family of pork butchers) if anyone is interested.

    As chance would have it i will be making quails egg Scotch eggs tomoorow because the family are arriving from the US and I think a help-yourself sort of buffet will be best to cope with a long journey and jet lag. Might just start a thread asking for further suggestions!

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by looksalot (U14606492) on Monday, 1st August 2011

    Some advice on baking scotch eggs please. When you bake them what temperature/timings do you use? Also, do you roll them, or spray them, in oil first?
    Thanks

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Lokelani (U8896212) on Tuesday, 2nd August 2011

    If I buy Waitrose or M&S premium sausagement it has the same stuff in as their premium sausages I'd hope. You've made me wonder now I shall check! They do seem to sell at least 2 or 3 grades of it though, same as they do sausages.

    Good thought about freezing, if it's not often seen in frozen food there's probably a good reason why!

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Tuesday, 2nd August 2011

    Sausagemeat freezes wonderfully - i stock up when they sell it off after Christmas

    50 per 500g package sometimes

    Hardboiled eggs do nto freeze well though so you can't freeze Scotch eggs

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by tulip (U14755128) on Wednesday, 3rd August 2011

    Just been to my slimming world class this morning, I have now lost a stone and am at target weight. Everyone was raving about the scotch eggs made with pork steaks, all fat removed and lean bacon. Blitzed and wrapped around the egg and baked in the oven. Will give them a try over the weekend and let you know what they are like.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by meto (U14090385) on Wednesday, 3rd August 2011

    Hi tulip. Did they say if they chopped their eggs before baking (see Msg #15)?

    Just wondering as hardboiled eggs can become quite leathery, so wondering if aside from the meat, there were tips about the egg itself.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by tulip (U14755128) on Wednesday, 3rd August 2011

    No hard boiled eggs the meat was dipped in egg and breadcrumbs and sprayed with a low fat spray before putting in the oven. Can;t vouch for them but will certainly be having ago. If you're familiar with slimming world they are 2.5 syns.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by auntisue (U13105113) on Wednesday, 3rd August 2011

    I wouldnt worry about the cholesterol, a treat once in a while is OK.
    I regularly make them using 3 skinned good sausages divided in half, one half moulded around one end of egg, the other half moulded around the other. Egg rolled in flour, moulded in the sausage meat, dipped in egg, then breadcrumbs. (best to only use one hand otherwise you get in an awful mess), cooked in oil
    sue

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    No hard boiled eggs the meat was dipped in egg and breadcrumbs and sprayed with a low fat spray before putting in the oven. Can;t vouch for them but will certainly be having ago. If you're familiar with slimming world they are 2.5 syns.  If ther is no hardboiled egg, then surely it isn't a Scotch Egg?

    I really don't like the egg in a Scotch egg chopped, especially if it is also mixed with mayo a la cheapo supermarket - it misses the whole point, which to me is that the egg is intact when you cut it in half

    We all seem to have overlooked one variant - the curry versio (no, not a chip shop nasty - Nargisi Kofta)

    indianfood.about.com...

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Pet (U14937760) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    smiley - laugh I thought that too Stokey Sue, then a read it with a comma between No and hard boiled eggs.
    (not chopped)

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by DEB (U6907879) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    how about these

    www.bbcgoodfood.com/...

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by tulip (U14755128) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    Sorry, should have said not chopped eggs, just plain hard!

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Alison Wright (U14267575) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    ........ or these?
    www.recipes4us.co.uk...

    I think they'd be even nicer if a slack handful of bought 'crispy fried onions' were crushed up/blitzed & added to the potato mix.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by meto (U14090385) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    tulip, thanks for your reply to me. You said first off that they were wrapped eggs, so no need to apologise. I probably should for complicating the issue and directing my question to you, other than for any handy tips.

    I think what I should have done is to ask whether or not eggs go leathery if not chopped but are baked.given that baking takes longer than relatively quick deep frying, which is a general question.

    Apols tulip.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by tulip (U14755128) on Thursday, 4th August 2011

    Thanks Meto but apologies not necessary! I don't know if they will go leathery with baking as I have only ever done the traditional type and deep fried, but, I am shopping tomorrow for the low fat type and will report back when I have made them over the weekend. My recipe says to bake them for 20mins which sounds a lot I admit. However people at my class have said they are very nice.

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by tulip (U14755128) on Sunday, 7th August 2011

    Just been to my slimming world class this morning, I have now lost a stone and am at target weight. Everyone was raving about the scotch eggs made with pork steaks, all fat removed and lean bacon. Blitzed and wrapped around the egg and baked in the oven. Will give them a try over the weekend and let you know what they are like.  Verdict on my low fat scotch eggs. When they were warm out of the oven they were very very nice. As they got cold they were a bit dry, as they would be having very little fat in them, but they were still very tasty. I needed to add a bit of moisture so I had some coleslaw I had made as a side dish. They were very large and substantial dish and yes I would make them again.
    I would think that scotch eggs made with traditional sausage meat, hence containing some fat, would cook in the oven very well - thus being a bit healthier.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Mamta (U2174216) on Sunday, 7th August 2011

    Wow Sue, what a variety of scotch eggs on this link! They are certainly thinking outside the box.
    The 'vegetarian' one made me laugh though, vegetarian egg!!
    It seems that any thick coating you can make that will make something like a kofta/kebab, will stick to eggs to make variants of scotch eggs. This is something to bear in mind for me. I wonder if the boiled egg will burst, if baked inside some sort of thin pastry?

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by meto (U14090385) on Sunday, 7th August 2011

    On coleslaw, a mix I make is just grated carrot, cheese, apple. Need to swish the apple in a bit of acidulated water unless eating instantly. It's wet enough not to need a dressing, although might need to assess the cheese calorie count. I like this as not gloopy at all.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Monday, 8th August 2011

    The 'vegetarian' one made me laugh though, vegetarian egg!!
     

    smiley - erm

    Mamta - most vegetarians in the UK are Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian - they eat eggs and dairy
    It's vegans that don't eat either (and the allergic of course!)

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Sakkarin (U7438804) on Sunday, 29th April 2012

    If you would like to continue with this discussion when the BBC Board shuts up shop, this thread is being continued on the Sakkarin forum at this address:

    www.carta.co.uk/food...

    Report message43

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