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October Dog Club

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Messages: 301 - 336 of 336
  • Message 301

    , in reply to message 299.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Poor new parents. When you see how exhausted and hollow eyed they are, you do wonder how on earth babies survive and get nurtured. But they usually do, so I'd guess the force of nature overrides all.

    Enjoy your cuggles with Hannah. Oh no, baby talk, and er...I don't use it with my grandchildren, but I do tend to get a bit silly with the PBs...  
    Indeed Lilo and as both Julia and Neil must have been genetically modified with Dormouse DNA - they really could both slep for England - this has come as a real culture shock to them.
    Physically demostrative I admit to being Lilo but am certainly not a cootchy coo man!
    I wonder if she likes her ears tickling like the shelties do. Must suggest that to Nand J because Freya simply swoons away into a soporiffic stae as soon as I tickle hers!
    According to Mrs F - and much to her chagrine - I speak very softly to the dogs who more often than not respond with alacrity to my requests - whereas her very convincing impersinations of a Grimsby Fish Wife which scatter the pigeons from the woods behind us fall on studiously deaf ears and then her fall back tactic of entreaties to do 'whatever' are treated by the dogs with utter and complete contempt. The strange thing is though when I am not at home they do anything she tells them to.

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  • Message 302

    , in reply to message 301.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    I don't have any knicker stories - though my first dog managed to eat a ready to cook pie from the dish on the work surface without knocking it off, which was a blessing as it was made of glass. It was so clean that for a moment I thought I must have put the pie somewhere else.

    The strange thing is though when I am not at home they do anything she tells them to. 
    Not really strange fellman. When you are there the dogs know you are team leader so ignore Mrs F. When you are absent, they accept her as team leader and will comply.

    Gertie got scared in the village earlier today. Just approaching our little thatched post office and a collecting postie came out of the door quite fast, dragging two post bags behind him. They made quite a noise. Gertie jumps backwards into the road (no pavements here) and barks furiously. Postie says in cowboy tones 'Git up there little dawg'. Not helpful. Luckily the approaching car was moving slowly as the PO is on a sharp narrow bend. Also luckily the headcollar is snug and held her.

    I got her back by me and to face the demon, but as we went up the road she kept turning and looking back with a soft woof to tell him off / keep him away. He wasn't a postie I'd seen before, not that I keep tabs, and I don't think he would have stopped to help me overcome that action by repeating it for me when I and Gertie could expect it.

    C

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  • Message 303

    , in reply to message 302.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    I don't have any knicker stories - though my first dog managed to eat a ready to cook pie from the dish on the work surface without knocking it off, which was a blessing as it was made of glass. It was so clean that for a moment I thought I must have put the pie somewhere else.

    The strange thing is though when I am not at home they do anything she tells them to. 
    Not really strange fellman. When you are there the dogs know you are team leader so ignore Mrs F. When you are absent, they accept her as team leader and will comply.

    Gertie got scared in the village earlier today. Just approaching our little thatched post office and a collecting postie came out of the door quite fast, dragging two post bags behind him. They made quite a noise. Gertie jumps backwards into the road (no pavements here) and barks furiously. Postie says in cowboy tones 'Git up there little dawg'. Not helpful. Luckily the approaching car was moving slowly as the PO is on a sharp narrow bend. Also luckily the headcollar is snug and held her.

    I got her back by me and to face the demon, but as we went up the road she kept turning and looking back with a soft woof to tell him off / keep him away. He wasn't a postie I'd seen before, not that I keep tabs, and I don't think he would have stopped to help me overcome that action by repeating it for me when I and Gertie could expect it.

    C

     
    So funny - will you try to explain to Mrs F (aka SHE who must be obeyed) that I am team leader here!!?
    Rikki - who is an ancestor of Gertie did have a stealing fetish But he only stole when we had visitors to get attention. Embarassingly he would sneak into the spare bed room which double as a clothes airing room in bed weather and walk back into the middle of of the sitting room with the first Mrs F's frillies (newly laundered I hasten to add) daintily displayed in his mouth - often adding to his performance by depositing said garment at the feet of a male guest.
    He never did this unless he had an audience

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  • Message 304

    , in reply to message 302.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    I don't have any knicker stories - though my first dog managed to eat a ready to cook pie from the dish on the work surface without knocking it off, which was a blessing as it was made of glass. It was so clean that for a moment I thought I must have put the pie somewhere else.

    The strange thing is though when I am not at home they do anything she tells them to. 
    Not really strange fellman. When you are there the dogs know you are team leader so ignore Mrs F. When you are absent, they accept her as team leader and will comply.

    Gertie got scared in the village earlier today. Just approaching our little thatched post office and a collecting postie came out of the door quite fast, dragging two post bags behind him. They made quite a noise. Gertie jumps backwards into the road (no pavements here) and barks furiously. Postie says in cowboy tones 'Git up there little dawg'. Not helpful. Luckily the approaching car was moving slowly as the PO is on a sharp narrow bend. Also luckily the headcollar is snug and held her.

    I got her back by me and to face the demon, but as we went up the road she kept turning and looking back with a soft woof to tell him off / keep him away. He wasn't a postie I'd seen before, not that I keep tabs, and I don't think he would have stopped to help me overcome that action by repeating it for me when I and Gertie could expect it.

    C

     
    Now that is unfortunate poor Gertie. Robin still has to woof at first sight of a black bin liner because the bin man threw a few ofthem into the dog area one afternoon when she was a puppy and the wind swirled them around like so many witches.
    I hope it leaves no lasting effects.

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  • Message 305

    , in reply to message 304.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Thanks fellman, but I don't think she will worry too much. Actually thinking about it now, I don't know why he was bringing bags out as the collection time is 17.15 and it was only 2.30pm.

    I have had an email from a cousin in NYC who is safe high in her apartment block and in says that in the evacuation centres, pets are welcome and they have cages for dogs and cats - goodness knows how noisy that must be and what they do for an exercise area. This is in big gym halls etc with camp beds - must be a bit of a nightmare.

    C

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  • Message 306

    , in reply to message 305.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Thanks fellman, but I don't think she will worry too much. Actually thinking about it now, I don't know why he was bringing bags out as the collection time is 17.15 and it was only 2.30pm.

    I have had an email from a cousin in NYC who is safe high in her apartment block and in says that in the evacuation centres, pets are welcome and they have cages for dogs and cats - goodness knows how noisy that must be and what they do for an exercise area. This is in big gym halls etc with camp beds - must be a bit of a nightmare.

    C

     
    I am a wee bit concerned about Pat who is my oppisite number in America - ir breed historian and I have been feeding her regular information since 2001 ahe lives in the relative wids in an all wooden slatted house of anquety without the finances to upgrade or strenghten it nd surrounded by tall ancient trees and she is onland right inthe projecyed path of the worst of the storm but far enough inland to avoid the expected water surge
    She has 14 shelties most of them aged and has no shelter she can go to with them, and she lives alone and is of pensinable age.
    Only 3 weeks ago a giant oak blew down at the side of her house in what was a gentle breeze by comparison with what is on its way.
    How these people live with the fairly regular threat of the worst exeses of nature i just can't comprehend.
    I an sure you are right about Gertie - poor Robin did not have the good start in life Gertie has been fortunate enough to have.

    Report message6

  • Message 307

    , in reply to message 306.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Monday, 29th October 2012

    Fingers crossed that all will be well for your friend Pat and her elderly shelties fellman. Nature reminds us on a regular basis that we humans don't really rule the world.

    C


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  • Message 308

    , in reply to message 307.

    Posted by Lilo (U12007400) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Oh Fellman how awful for that poor lady! I was thinking about the animals caught up in it, last night, watching the news. Obviously the humans, but how terrified they must all be.

    Report message8

  • Message 309

    , in reply to message 308.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Oh Fellman how awful for that poor lady! I was thinking about the animals caught up in it, last night, watching the news. Obviously the humans, but how terrified they must all be.  Indeed Lilo
    Pat has some of the pioneering spirit in her and lives where she lives out of initial choice and now necessity of course
    Have met her twice on my visits to judge and speak in USA and I couldn't descibe her as a 'modern American' and perhaps this is why she is quite stoical - nay stubborn - in some ways. Her recently departed horse's barn blew down in the last big wind and she built it back up herself From the photos many of our builders would hav refused the job. The Americans have an expression they use to descibe such as Pat which I give in the vencular - It most aptly describes her, -
    'She's a corn fed gal - who goes b'ar huntin' with a switch'!!!

    Report message9

  • Message 310

    , in reply to message 307.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Fingers crossed that all will be well for your friend Pat and her elderly shelties fellman. Nature reminds us on a regular basis that we humans don't really rule the world.

    C


     
    I hope so Constance - the world needs such characters and they are now a vanishing breed. Her late husband was rendered a quadraplegic(sp) on helicopter mission in Vietnam and a son is sadly alcoholic and lives 2000 miles away. She has macular degeneration in her eyes too Her dogs are all to her - and her historical work of course
    I don;t hear from her too often but when I do I am staggered that she gets the strength from somewhere to cope with what is by any standards a really tough and in so many ways primitive life - in tese 'enlightened' and high tech times.

    Report message10

  • Message 311

    , in reply to message 309.

    Posted by 2pa (U15424935) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Sounds like me. Can't be doing with modernstuff or fuss, social workers and medicine. Die with yer boots on is my motto. I've lived most of my life outside and without electricty or mains water. After all, we lived very well without them for zillions fo yearsand any mmodernstuff I've encountered has harmed me and others. Dying in a hurricane wouldbe far preferable to dying in a Hospital or ccccCarehome - more fun, cleaner, quicker, less painful and not being bossed or interfered with by strangers.

    Might change the his name from youtu.be/0qzx5x-uKKA... to youtu.be/iALGml0BQoI...

    Haven't been able to write or answer as too ill and storms, floods, etc., but just to tell you that Zorro is fine, but I may change his name to' and his "recall time" (I think that's what youc all it) is about 1-5 seconds, depending on how far away he is, but more if the mission is a rabbit or flock of birds. (I used to be able to fly a bit, too - you can when you're young enough to believe and he still is.) I didn't do Training, as I could see it'd fail and set bad pattern. This is what I do: if he's far away, where he wouldn't notice (see, hear, etc) my going in a particular direction, I give a brief whistle that says, "I'm going that way now." If he can see or hear me, I just make a slight gesture, not sure what it is, that says the same. If he's very far away or there's a lot of wind or there are trees and rocks between us, I'll whistle twice or whistle and give ashout to tell him where I am. I don't command him to come or even ask him to; it really is a free choice and I truly mean it. I don't look back to see whether he's coming or praise him when he does, but I do greet him in a friendly but casual way as he arrives, or zooms past like a rocket before slowing to wait for me. He had that free choice and still has it and he realised almost at once that choosing to come with me was always preferable, as he'd otherwise miss the rest of the walk or I might even decide to go backto the tent. Other times, I don't moind where or when we go and he's the one who chooses. Of course, there are situations in which he needs to stay beside me, but he nearly always does it without even having a collar and lead.
    Obviously,this wouldn't work for eveyone, everywhere - it's just what works for us.
    I hardly ever speak to him, except in a friendly babble just to chat. I don't use verbal commands, now we know each other - just body language and whistling.
    I'm glad Constance said about dogs being adaptable, as I can hardly breathe at all lately, so he'll need to be. Santy, my mate here, whose father bred Podencos and had every kind of animal and fruit tree and wisdom, says I worry too much and that, once I'm not here, Zorro will soon sell himself to a new owner!
    He's very funny about presents. Anything he really, really likes is taken away and buried in a secret vault. He must have at least twenty by now, each on a separate plot of the site. (200 plots, 12 bunglows, five campers, but never mind, as it was all paid for by a grant from the Junta de Andalucía and the owner, who received the grant, is the richest man in the area - typical.) I got him a lovely bouncy ball and he even banked that! (Zorro, I mean, not Owner.)
    I was going to cancel my BBC membership about ten days after joini0ng. I stayed because TN and S friendlily invited me to the Dog Club and you were all friendly and helpful. If I'm not here any more, it may be because of not wanting to participate in the BBC (which I've disliked for decades) or because too ill or finally relieved of illness, but wanted to let you know now, in case, that this Podenco is a happy dog, despite the stomach full of salami and dressing-gowns.

    Report message11

  • Message 312

    , in reply to message 311.

    Posted by Thursday Next (U2257911) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    I'm glad you are still here 2pa and so pleased to hear Zorro is doing so well. Sorry to hear you have been ill. Look after yourself.

    Report message12

  • Message 313

    , in reply to message 311.

    Posted by solwright (U14953337) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Good to hear from you again 2pa. Zorro and you make a good team.

    Hope your health improves.

    Report message13

  • Message 314

    , in reply to message 311.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Hi 2pa - good to hear from you and to know that you and Zorro have come to an understanding. I've said before that we often talk too much to dogs - they 'read' our body language and state of mind so well. Yes they are adaptable, but I hope you'll improve, weather and other things not withstanding, that we get to hear more of the results of your patience and effort and what you and Zorro are up to.

    Take care,

    C

    Report message14

  • Message 315

    , in reply to message 314.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Hi 2pa - good to hear from you and to know that you and Zorro have come to an understanding. I've said before that we often talk too much to dogs - they 'read' our body language and state of mind so well. Yes they are adaptable, but I hope you'll improve, weather and other things not withstanding, that we get to hear more of the results of your patience and effort and what you and Zorro are up to.

    Take care,

    C

     
    I was only wondering about you yesterday 2pa
    Stiff upper lip lass - if I can do it so can you and Zorro
    Went to see Hannah again for an hour this afternoon - she held on to my finger for a good long while and didn't grissle once when i had her She just gazed at me with the most beautiful eyes in the world - and I am a lost soul!
    Lilo I didn;t coochi coo once but did get into trouble for singing to her my version of Puff the magic Dragon
    which went like this
    Pufff the Maggic Dragon lived all alone
    He didn;t have a lady friend that he could call his own.
    Then one day he met her - a crackin' bit of stuff
    He didn;t know what do with her - that's why they call him P*ff
    I taught her dad that too! And he sang it on his first day at school! Do you think history could repeat itself?

    Report message15

  • Message 316

    , in reply to message 315.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Tuesday, 30th October 2012

    Well fellman - the first few years of a child's life are crucial to their development into adults, so who knows what little Hannah will come out with at playgroup/school with such a grandparent! I'm sure she found your dulcet tones fascinating and she already knows how to twist you round her tiny finger. I know she's a very lucky little girl to have a loving g-father.

    C

    Report message16

  • Message 317

    , in reply to message 316.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Well fellman - the first few years of a child's life are crucial to their development into adults, so who knows what little Hannah will come out with at playgroup/school with such a grandparent! I'm sure she found your dulcet tones fascinating and she already knows how to twist you round her tiny finger. I know she's a very lucky little girl to have a loving g-father.

    C

     
    She did smile while I sang - nah it wasn't wind.
    I was disgrace fully non conformist father to Neil and am enjoying being a (loveable?) rogue of a grandfather to Hannah.
    My family were not inclined to displays of affection when i was a child - spare the rod and spoil the child - old fashioned Scots approach and laughter in the house we shared with my grandparents must have been a capital offence!
    But I was determined things would be different for Neil as a youngster and I reckon I can get away with even more riotous behaviour as a more than slightly dotty G father! besides which it will annoy the hell out of Julia's Mum so a double beneit!
    It is me who is lucky - I never thought to experience this

    Report message17

  • Message 318

    , in reply to message 317.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    So when can we expect to see Hannah in the Junior Handler classes then? Is there a lower age limit? Shelties of course are a good size for children - I've seen some strange pairings in family dog shows. Small children with great big and strong Labs who are towing their handlers around.

    Gertie is 9 months old today - doesn't time fly?

    C

    Report message18

  • Message 319

    , in reply to message 317.

    Posted by solwright (U14953337) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    I reckon I can get away with even more riotous behaviour as a more than slightly dotty G father! besides which it will annoy the hell out of Julia's Mum so a double beneit!  

    I like it! More power to your elbow.

    I was just thinking how rarely I see shelties around here now. There was one who had been rehomed and was totally devoted to her new owner, walking along beside her in most dignified fashion. I'm sure she never left that lady's side for the rest of her life.

    Report message19

  • Message 320

    , in reply to message 318.

    Posted by Thursday Next (U2257911) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Or junior strangling classes as they are often known!

    Some of the youngsters are good and really seem to have an affinity with their dogs, others seem to think the way of training their dogs is by pulling them around on very tight leads and collars.

    Watching junior handlers when the judge has a wicked sense of humour is good - the handler should never be between the dog and the judge and some of them take this to extreme by very obviously jumping this way and that way to keep out of the way. A wicked judge starts moving around to keep the poor kids on the move.

    Report message20

  • Message 321

    , in reply to message 320.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    A wicked judge starts moving around to keep the poor kids on the move. 
    That made me laugh TN! Don't they attend ringcraft classes to see how it should be done? Mind you I've seen (on TV) some poor handling by adults, especially when they change direction without warning the dog, who poor thing, gets a sharp jerk in the neck. It really ain't difficult to warn your dog you want them to listen and there is an 'about turn' coming up.

    We have something similar in agility. Some young handlers are really good and do their own training; others are obviously running the dog their parent has trained. In agility, the young handlers compete against everyone else. There are a few shows with young handler classes but not many.

    I've only seen one child in tears because it all went wrong and blamed the dog; so most youngsters seem to understand that it is teamwork. It's quite a lot to remember - the course, where they should be in relation to the dog and plan B when the dog isn't where you thought it would be at any obstacle.

    C


    Report message21

  • Message 322

    , in reply to message 318.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    So when can we expect to see Hannah in the Junior Handler classes then? Is there a lower age limit? Shelties of course are a good size for children - I've seen some strange pairings in family dog shows. Small children with great big and strong Labs who are towing their handlers around.

    Gertie is 9 months old today - doesn't time fly?

    C

     
    NEVER I HOPE.
    I am not a great fan of them not only because of Thursday's comeents but also beacause it teaches them that the handler and his/her technique is more important thanthe dog THESE DAYS When they first became popular neil used toenter them at Breed Club shows - but soon said he would rather handle with the adults!
    But in those days it was all a much simpler competition.
    now al the revers T shapes and twiddles a pas de deaurs they have to do to show their 'womderful skills' and the dogs off to their nest advantage seem like am elaborate game of charades and I have been judging since 1970 and never once had anyone in the 12 different counties i have judged in show a dog like that' YET all have managed to show me the dog's quality.
    I also dislike seeing small children dressed as mini adults in smart business suits - For heavens sake it is the dog who the judge shulf be lookng at not the hjandler There are fashion shows aplenty for juviniles withut turning DOG showing into one!!
    Herrrrumpph!!

    Report message22

  • Message 323

    , in reply to message 322.

    Posted by solwright (U14953337) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Oh come on, fellman, don't hold back. Why don't you say what you really mean?!

    Report message23

  • Message 324

    , in reply to message 322.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    I also dislike seeing small children dressed as mini adults in smart business suits 

    I don't like it either - you must also have seen leading rein classes at a horse show - where the mums and it seems to be mums more than dads, who dress as if at a Buck Palace garden party rather than trotting around a field with a pony and child!

    I've only judged at one family dog show but didn't care a fig for what the junior handlers were wearing, but awarded on how they related to the dog and their manner with it. Didn't get swayed by cuteness either.

    Luckily in agility no-one cares what you wear. Many wear their club's polo shirts, but I've even seen a few women run in skirts, not unusual in the showing world but rare in agility. The funniest was a fancy dress class - silk and lace - at the Dogs in Need agility week. Some of the men were a hoot and I didn't recognise some of them so good were the costumes.

    C

    Report message24

  • Message 325

    , in reply to message 323.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Sorry. I do tend to call a spade a bl**dy shovel. What yousee sadly is what you get with me!!

    Report message25

  • Message 326

    , in reply to message 325.

    Posted by solwright (U14953337) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Excellent. I approve of that. My boss didn't though, when I took that approach at work. He was glad to see the back of me when I retired, and the feeling was mutual.

    I like the fact that the staff at the pound are pretty direct too, when people are trying to rehome an unsuitable dog.

    Report message26

  • Message 327

    , in reply to message 324.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    I also dislike seeing small children dressed as mini adults in smart business suits 

    I don't like it either - you must also have seen leading rein classes at a horse show - where the mums and it seems to be mums more than dads, who dress as if at a Buck Palace garden party rather than trotting around a field with a pony and child!

    I've only judged at one family dog show but didn't care a fig for what the junior handlers were wearing, but awarded on how they related to the dog and their manner with it. Didn't get swayed by cuteness either.

    Luckily in agility no-one cares what you wear. Many wear their club's polo shirts, but I've even seen a few women run in skirts, not unusual in the showing world but rare in agility. The funniest was a fancy dress class - silk and lace - at the Dogs in Need agility week. Some of the men were a hoot and I didn't recognise some of them so good were the costumes.

    C

     
    Nobody used to care in dog showing either Constance and provodong your back side wasn;t hanging out of your trousers and you didn;t smell worse than a Puli - you passed muster
    Of course there were those men who habitually wore a suit sometimes plis fours - others wore a stockmans coat and some were dressed very casually Like wise there were some ladies who dressed in floppy hats and skirts which looked like lounge curtains - others in the sixties and seventies who would today's pole dancersappear to be the eliamy of modesty (ah those happy days!)
    Judging was different - and everyone made an effort
    But these days the handlers in many cases are better presented than the dogs and it sometimes seems to me that the handlers are on show rather than the charges.
    But the saliebt point is that many of the new breed of business suit clad handlers started life as junior handlers where outfit is important and if parents could npt afford to kit them out to win - they did not go to the shows. Virtually every breed columnist has bemoaned the lack of young peple coming into the breeds There are many reasons - health issues being one important one - but finance is definately anther and i would not like to outlay the money required to keep a young handler suited and booted to the standard which has become the norm.

    Report message27

  • Message 328

    , in reply to message 326.

    Posted by Constance (U14594138) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Another shovel-caller and wysiwyg here!

    Someone at work once said to me that they could always count on an honest opinion if they asked it of me and they always knew where they stood with me - - I took that as a compliment!

    C

    Report message28

  • Message 329

    , in reply to message 328.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Another shovel-caller and wysiwyg here!

    Someone at work once said to me that they could always count on an honest opinion if they asked it of me and they always knew where they stood with me - - I took that as a compliment!

    C

     
    Quite right too Constance . You would fit in very well in Cumbria where swivel eyed people and those with more faces than the town hall clock are avoided like the plague.

    Report message29

  • Message 330

    , in reply to message 329.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Wave to everyone in the dog club. Haven't been here in ages.

    Rocky dog is still as loveable and manic as ever. 7 years old and he still bounces like zebedee. I left him in the garden this afternoon whilst I ran a few errands with my 4 year old grandson (who sat in the back of the car making appropriate car noises every time I changed gear).

    When we got back the dog had a short gash on his cheek so I took him to the vet in case it needed a stitch. Boy did it need stitches as it was quite deep. I looks like he somehow managed to spear himself. He now has a massive collar on.

    Those of you who have long memories may recall me posting a video of Rocky about five years ago chasing after a ball with a collar on. At that time it took him quite a while to get used to it and be able to get into the car, negotiate doors, go up steps, etc. without bashing it. This time he seemed to need no reminding, jumped straight into the car without a problem and so on.

    This is the original video from 2007.

    [URL=s220.photobucket.com...[IMG]i220.photobucket.com.../IMG][/URL]

    And today.

    [IMG]i220.photobucket.com.../IMG]

    Report message30

  • Message 331

    , in reply to message 330.

    Posted by What larks (U14260755) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    I'm not sure I'm getting all the pictures, but saw "Poor Rocky": I hope he isn't feeling too sorry for himself..

    I remember a photo of him in a hoody, and was so taken I thought about getting one for Ben. He has such big ears that might be a problem!

    Report message31

  • Message 332

    , in reply to message 330.

    Posted by solwright (U14953337) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Your links aren't working for me at all now. The first time I tried I got some photos which showed Rocky looking adorable, tho' I'm not sure it was the intended video.

    He looks really cute. Is he pure staffie?

    Report message32

  • Message 333

    , in reply to message 332.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Wednesday, 31st October 2012

    Sorry that the links don't work. If you got to my album then the Rocky movie is on page two (Rocky chasing), along with several photos of his severely battered and mended with duck tape collar.

    He's not pure staffie, he's a cross and too tall for a pure staffie. He is a little darling but very strong and bouncy. We reckon he does weights when we are out. He's never unsupervised around children because he's so enthusiastic he would knock them over. TBH my neighbour braces herself against a wall to say hello to him.

    We have a series of baby gates around the house so we can contain him from visitors and grandchildren. It's a bit of a shame because there isn't a malicious bone in his body but he is too bouncy and enthusiastic.

    I wish I'd had him from a puppy, he was two before he was mine to try to train and OH wasn't consistent when I did attempt training. The four year old grandon is learning the commands and the dog is starting to respond to him so there may be hope yet.

    Report message33

  • Message 334

    , in reply to message 329.

    Posted by Lilo (U12007400) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    Apologies for not reading through, but I will. Hi Nomad! Up very early and dashing about as The Viking has early appointments.

    News comes from Alison my newly acquired groomer. She is fantastic! Absolutely lovely, and yesterday afternoon did an amazing clip on both Poodle Boys, and seemed somehow to bring out their characters without even knowing them. Because I bathed them she only charged half the usual rates, and is very modest in her talents, not being a trained groomer. Never mind that, she's a million miles better than that lot down in the village.

    She did Isaac first, so I could collect him early, reported she put a muzzle on his just in case, as he didn't know her and she didn't know him. Sensible. She is, after all, a veterinary nurse. Said she didn't need it and that he was a reasonably relaxed lad. Even let her clip his nails without one. A sucker for a pretty face ; -)

    Said Murph was great, let her do anything, which is about right. The tart.

    The difference in this experience was that when we came home (walking distance) Isaac went straight up the field and saw the welsh spaniel girls and Miserable Sylvia with Teddy the welsh terrier*, came home, had his tea and fell into a deep sleep until it was time to collect Murph. A million miles from the freaked-out behaviour last time.

    I know this would sound silly to anyone else, but I've been worrying about this for ages, trying it myself was no good and knowing that I *had* to find someone. Alison only has a few dogs as regulars and has agreed to take my two on permanently. Hurray!

    This morning, it's blowing a gale and pouring with rain. A certain silvery (much paler now he's been clipped) poodle boy is refusing to go out.
    We shall see...

    * Miserable Sylvia is one of those women who has nothing positive or nice to say about anyone. I've tolerated her for a long time, I do have a long fuse (TV would beg to differ) but yesterday...woooo.....told her I'd found Alison who'd done such a great job. "Oh HER" she sniffed..

    Well! I lost it a bit and replied through gritted teeth "Oh for god's sake what are you going to tell me NOW" (she disses everyone).

    "Oh nothing nothing. I'd have taken Teddy to her HAD she returned my phone call..."

    I told TV. He said Alison has probably sussed her out and is keeping a low profile. He also said we should kidnap Teddy and bring him to live with us!


    Some people! I'm going to avoid her in future. She brings me down every time.

    Anyhoo...happy day all xxx

    Report message34

  • Message 335

    , in reply to message 334.

    Posted by fellman (U14848647) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    Apologies for not reading through, but I will. Hi Nomad! Up very early and dashing about as The Viking has early appointments.

    News comes from Alison my newly acquired groomer. She is fantastic! Absolutely lovely, and yesterday afternoon did an amazing clip on both Poodle Boys, and seemed somehow to bring out their characters without even knowing them. Because I bathed them she only charged half the usual rates, and is very modest in her talents, not being a trained groomer. Never mind that, she's a million miles better than that lot down in the village.

    She did Isaac first, so I could collect him early, reported she put a muzzle on his just in case, as he didn't know her and she didn't know him. Sensible. She is, after all, a veterinary nurse. Said she didn't need it and that he was a reasonably relaxed lad. Even let her clip his nails without one. A sucker for a pretty face ; -)

    Said Murph was great, let her do anything, which is about right. The tart.

    The difference in this experience was that when we came home (walking distance) Isaac went straight up the field and saw the welsh spaniel girls and Miserable Sylvia with Teddy the welsh terrier*, came home, had his tea and fell into a deep sleep until it was time to collect Murph. A million miles from the freaked-out behaviour last time.

    I know this would sound silly to anyone else, but I've been worrying about this for ages, trying it myself was no good and knowing that I *had* to find someone. Alison only has a few dogs as regulars and has agreed to take my two on permanently. Hurray!

    This morning, it's blowing a gale and pouring with rain. A certain silvery (much paler now he's been clipped) poodle boy is refusing to go out.
    We shall see...

    * Miserable Sylvia is one of those women who has nothing positive or nice to say about anyone. I've tolerated her for a long time, I do have a long fuse (TV would beg to differ) but yesterday...woooo.....told her I'd found Alison who'd done such a great job. "Oh HER" she sniffed..

    Well! I lost it a bit and replied through gritted teeth "Oh for god's sake what are you going to tell me NOW" (she disses everyone).

    "Oh nothing nothing. I'd have taken Teddy to her HAD she returned my phone call..."

    I told TV. He said Alison has probably sussed her out and is keeping a low profile. He also said we should kidnap Teddy and bring him to live with us!


    Some people! I'm going to avoid her in future. She brings me down every time.

    Anyhoo...happy day all xxx

     
    Hope I am not treading on anyone's toes Lilo but experience has taught me that qualifications don;t necessarily equate with abilities and I have never seen a degree course in common sense.
    In days of yore there was bi NXQ courses in dog grooming and it was learned by watching someone who made a half deent job of it and then trial and error The successful ones also had talent and empathy but no certificates to pin on the wall proclaiimg their competence.
    Most males are sucjers for a pretty face and I am convinced that was the case with the ex mrs F who had a obile grooming service and could quieten dogs who were little ore than hairy crocadiles when a brish was produced - according to their owners. She would never use a muzzle - said it made dogs even more agitated and it worked except with Frankesnstein the Cien and a Scottie who bit right throughher hand!
    TV is a lucky man When I leave hme early I creeo arund in the dark lest the one eye over the duvet surfaces and those immpotrtal words 'yu are quite mad you do realise' are uttered. Mrs F does not do mornings until I take her the obligatory freshly brewed proper coffee she does a pasible imitation of a grizzly bear / She aslo has the abilty to discern if I have used three grains more or less in making it!

    Report message35

  • Message 336

    , in reply to message 334.

    Posted by What larks (U14260755) on Thursday, 1st November 2012

    Phew! Thank goodness you've found a new groomer, Lilo. She sounds a "treasure".

    We have been cutting some horrible thorny prickles out of Ben's long tail and "trousers". They look like something out of a medieval torture room. I have never dared take him to a grooming parlour partly because he is such a wimp about his bottom bits being touched - they are a disgrace. (Too much information?)

    As for grumpy walkers - well, they don't bother me unless they are criticising my dog, though I think I'd avoid Mislerable Sylvia just because I'd find her so depressing to be with. A woman I meet and chat too sometimes when I'm walking Ben alone took one look at J, the visiting overgrown staff, and said "Oh, I don't trust those dogs" and put her dogs on leads. They were Jack Russells and I was oh-so-tempted to tell her that the only dog that has ever attacked me was a JR.

    Actually, J is such a wimp it is becoming a problem. He'll be here at the weekend so more later.

    Report message36

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