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The Autumn/Winter Potting Shed

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Welcome to the potting shed. Our place to discuss all things botanical and horticultural. It doesn't matter if you are a beginner, expert, flower or vegetable grower; just join in. The more the merrier and we all learn from each other.

    After a very challenging (euphanism) year for the garden it's now late September and time to harvest, take stock, tidy up and prepare for next year.

    On the positive side I've had to do very little watering and if I were a slug farmer I would have had a bumper crop!

    Anyone up for introductions?

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Leaping Badger (U3587940) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Hi there Nomes. Good time to start a winter thread - it's f-f-f-freezing out there! And to think I was sunbathing two days ago.

    Not much going on in the garden, I have some tomatoes still ripening, which hopefully will get chance to ripen before it gets too cold, a cucumber developing, ditto, and some peas doing quite well. After that it's just broccoli to see me through the winter, and a lot of tidying up.
    'Ö'

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by SussexCornflower InTheFinalCountdown (U13833966) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Thanks XNo.... and hello Badger!

    I too have some outdoor tomatoes looking as if they might stay rather green. Don't like chutney so not sure what I will do with them.

    Got a large tub full of little carrots though and they are quite tasty.


    The sedum is a lovely dark pink and the bees and hover flies are enjoying it.

    The evening primrose hated the rain but has been flowering over the last through dry, sunny weeks.

    And I have a hedgehog !!! Yay!



    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Link to last thread

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    My introduction.....

    I'm more of a vegetable and fruit grower rather than a flower grower although I have done both.

    I live in East Yorkshire and have a veggie plot that is approximately 10x15 metres on my next door neighbour's land that I am gradually taming and forming into beds. I started this plot 5 years ago.

    I had a garden in London and grew vegetables and flowers and cultivated orchids for many years before moving here almost 10 years ago. I can't grow orchids here because the humidity and light I have available is all wrong (my collection died).

    I am thoroughly enjoying being able to grow more and different fruits and vegetables and learning such a lot through every season.

    I did the RHS level 2 certificate in 2008. I found it very worthwhile putting some theory behind some of the stuff I knew from practice. I now know why things happen but I'm still up for trying things out and I certainly don't know everything.

    OH does gardening as a chore rather than a pleasure and is a slasher and cutter in as little time as possible. He mows the grass and strims. He regularly tells me that I can buy vegetables from Tescos (other supermarkets are available).

    So I like talking about gardening here. How about you?

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by David K (U14115317) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Good luck with your new thread, XNo.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    David, thank you for all your contributions, help and advice. I hope you will continue to post.

    The thread doesn't belong to me so it isn't my thread. I was just the thread starter on this occasion.

    Why don't you post your introduction? You have such a wealth of knowledge it would be great to have you in the first few posts.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by SussexCornflower InTheFinalCountdown (U13833966) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Yes, please continue to post David. Your knowledge and experience will be missed if you don't.



    Introductions:-

    I only really fell in love with gardening after moving to the house I am in now about 16 years ago. It is a small town garden : never measured it but it's not big!

    Mostly shrubs and flowers : I especially like the daphne in the early spring, the honeysuckle in the summer, the vine and my lovely witch hazel in a large tub. I have a lawn (well, grass + moss) and a mini hawthorn hedge.

    I made a tiny barrell pond a few years ago which gives me endless entertainment.

    It is a great therapy from the daily office job!


    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by David K (U14115317) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    Thank you for your kind words, XNo. I’ve been aware for some time that the PS was stagnating and thought it would benefit from a fresh injection of new ideas.
    Glad to have been able to be of some use in the past, but time this old codger was put out to grass, me thinks.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Monday, 24th September 2012

    It's entirely up to you David. I would love to see your introduction if you were willing to post it. A potted history of David for the potting shed.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by dens canis (U1983532) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    As one who has benefitted from your advice I'd be sorry to see you drop below the horizon, David.

    I have two London gardens, both very small. My own is trees, lawn, flowerbeds and pots. The other is a neighbour's garden a couple of doors down, which I garden as an allotment in partnership with yet another neighbour. This year has been a poor one except for our greengages (though someone - yet another neighbour, I suspect) stole half the crop, and damsons. We put all the fruit trees in about four years ago.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by sue (U8059472) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    I am enjoying the introductions
    I have lived in France for 10 years where I had an allotment and caught the bug
    Myself and partner moved to Anglesey 2 years ago. We are building a house of stone and hemp and we have 2 acres. The plan is towards self sufficiency. We have planted a wind break, fruit and nut trees and coppice wood
    Key words-Agroforest, forest garden, permaculture
    This year has been difficult with the weather. I have really got stuck into the building so the land has had to take a bit of a back seat. I am using this time to learn about what the land wants-lots and lots of drainage as well as wind breaks
    Sort of 2 hills leading down to a central stream. I have chickens and pigs and ducks. No bees or goats yet but maybe next year.
    I was writing a blog but this slowed up. The building work has been fast and furious this last few months. I will try to get more done to that this winter
    I have winter salad seedlings coming up ready to go into the polytunnel. Mitzuna,indian mustard, chinese mustard,lambs lettuce. Massive pumpkins to be harvested soon

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by David K (U14115317) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    Oh Gawd! I do dislike posting my personal stuff online, but can't leave this like this.....truth is I've been diagnosed with a tumour in my left eye. Had a biopsy last Friday and the surgeon says it needs to be removed urgently. So as you will understand, I will have visual problems for a while which will impede my use of the pooter.

    Sorry if my recent postings haven’t reflected my usual style...but now you know.

    Wish me luck!

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    I'd be glad if you don't go, David, because you were very kind to me when I arrived and asked futile questions.

    As an introduction, I have a house I moved into three years ago, with a lawn that (I was told last week by the neighbour, who has been sounding us out most carefully and decided at the weekend we are ok really) was re-rurfed shortly before we bought the place and has started to develop a life of its own as well as being impossible to make look anything but a mess, so I am letting it go and throwing wild flower seed at it as it happened during tthe past summer; we'll see what grows. I've also planted two small ferms in a shady edge, where they seem to have survived hurrah! and six small thyme plants two of which are flourishing and the other four vanished under the grass. The clover and the daisies have simply happened, as have two nettles (gone) a bramble (gone) and about a dozen dandelions. All I am worried about is that it should be free from hazards for walking.

    I have a stoop (elavated patio) on which I have pots with tomatoes (successful this year, surprisingly) and loganberries and strawberries (ditto) and down on the lawn I have two half-barrels with a newly-planted and flourishing rhubarb in one of them and two newly-planted raspberry plants in the other. I am not supposed to pick any rhubarb until next year, but it has been hard to keep my hands off it...

    That's about it apart from several ornamental trees which I do not love, most particularly unloving the forsythia in the small bed at the front outside the kitchen window, which is visibly dying. It has had hardly any leaves this summer, and no flowers, and I don't think it will do anything at all next year, at which point i expect I shall grub it out and plant something else more suited to almost no soil: maybe a rowan.

    In fact I am hardly a gardener at all and here under false pretences, but when I have a problem (what do I do about this damn' bush!?) people here are helpful and don't make me feel an idiot. For which much thanks to all.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    David, I was composing while you posted. Sorry for tactlessness.

    I wish you all the luck in the world.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by SussexCornflower InTheFinalCountdown (U13833966) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    Oh Gawd! I do dislike posting my personal stuff online, but can't leave this like this.....truth is I've been diagnosed with a tumour in my left eye. Had a biopsy last Friday and the surgeon says it needs to be removed urgently. So as you will understand, I will have visual problems for a while which will impede my use of the pooter.

    Sorry if my recent postings haven’t reflected my usual style...but now you know.

    Wish me luck!
     






    Sorry to read your news, David. Certainly wishing you luck and hope you can still call in here from time to time as and when you feel like it.

    Take care of yourself.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by dens canis (U1983532) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    What Sussex said. No wonder you have been a bit distracted. All the very best from me.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by sagethyme (U5272261) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    David
    Just found this. Wishing you luck and swift healing old fellow.
    We need to see you back here giving your wise advice and encouragement as ever.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Leaping Badger (U3587940) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    Hi David, really sorry to hear this news. Must be very distressing. I hope that the surgery proves straightforward and you're back in top form very soon. Very best wishes and much nitrogen-rich compost* in the meantime.

    These introductions are a bit Alcoholics Anonymous, aren't they? Hello, my name's Leaping Badger and I'm a gardener. [Hi, Leaping Badger.] I've been gardening for 5 years, 9 months and 2 days. I started with a few herbs and a bit of lettuce, but then it started to get out of control and I was growing tomatoes, potatoes, peas, beans, cucumbers, peppers, aubergines, and it was starting to take my life over. Now, thanks to your support (and a rubbish summer), I've got it down to four tomato plants, a cucumber and a few peas. I'm just taking it one dig at a time.
    'Ö'

    *This sounds like a good gardener's wish to me.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by sagethyme (U5272261) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    Forgot to mention we have a suburban garden with too many mature trees for the size.
    All the neighours have many trees so we are always going to be shady whatever we do. We have ours trimmed every 3 years and this is Tree Surgeon Year, getting quotes, so should have more light next year.
    We like some lawn and have argued with you all amicably about the benefits. Herbs, flowers, shrubs, a few fruit trees, a few veg. Least good at veg but will keep trying.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    Good luck David.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by atishy twinkletwinkle pop (U14258311) on Tuesday, 25th September 2012

    My very best wishes to you David. Having lurked-a-lot on your thread in the past it's always been like a personalised GQT of our very own, with wit and wisdom from yourself and many others that one already feels familiar with. Long may it continue in the same vein with Nomad at the helm and your good self to sprinkle occasional handfuls of fertilizer over us! All the best to you.


    I have a pond.

    Actually, I now have two ponds. The first, I dug myself - rectangular, about 1 1/2 x 3 yards, fairly formal but now softened with plantings, 3 years old. It was in the digging of said pond that I realised I was living as a fool if I thought I'd ever be able to make my own wildlife pond.

    So some proper men came and did it for me. It's so exciting! In all it's about 50 squids and looks sad and bare, but give it a few seasons and it'll rival Kew. (O.K., that may be a bit ambitious). It has been spotted by the local heron. Anyone know if they make good eating? The pond is sited in not the best of places, under trees. I'd really appreciate suggestions for planting around the edges, and any plants for the water that others have found not to be of the thug variety.

    Hello Nomad, et al.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by rufushummer (U14267672) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    I work at a garden centre in Victoria BC. Generally, we have mild winters, only a week or so of snow and ice and it melts shortly afterwards. The cold and damp can last a long time. What we are leaning to at the garden centre is winter gardening, with perennials and shrubs that shine in the grey days. Berries, fragrance or bark. Such as callicarpa, daphnes, osmanthus and various cornus.
    My own garden is leaning towards more veg-I have plently of kale and collards and swiss chard right now, garlic planting next week. Good harvest of the plums this year. I would like to expand the rhubarb bed next year and raspberries.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    Oooo yes, the rhubarb. I've got two crowns that are just about ready for splitting so I'm just going to wait for it to stop raining.....

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    Very best wishes to you David.

    I am a complete beginner at this gardening lark. I sometimes listen to Gardeners Question Time, but don't retain much of the information given!

    We don't have a large garden and years ago we landscaped the back garden, with dry stone walls as it is so steep.
    We did this ourselves, lack of dosh, and begged family and friends for plants etc.
    Over the years we have been able to see what has worked and what hasn't. Hit and miss gardening I call it!

    We have a few containers and have sent for bulbs etc which have started to arrive. And once it stops raining will plant them.
    We are trying to get some colour into the garden.

    I have tried a few times to grow from seed but no joy there.
    But we have a hedgehog box now!
    So hoping for it to be used..food is going but not sure if it's a hedgehog.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by sue (U8059472) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    All the best David, you are in my thoughts

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by sue (U8059472) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    atishy, this village hall is a very busy place and also has a pond thread
    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by atishy twinkletwinkle pop (U14258311) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    Thank you very very much Sue.


    Pulls on wellies and marches out waving net etc.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Wednesday, 26th September 2012

    Hello Firesprite. Are you trying to get colour into the garden in the containers or do you want to generally introduce colour?

    I ask because container gardening is usually refreshed every year (or season) but planting in the garden gives more scope for perrenials which would give you colour year after year.

    Would you describe your garden as terraced or a rock garden?

    You can order a wide variety of plug plants in the spring from most of the seed/nursery companies if seeds don't work for you. These would provide you with annuals if you wanted them. I generally buy plug pelargoniums for a bed I have under the porch.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Hello Nomadnomore,

    Yes, definitely trying to get more colour into the garden.
    Have ordered perrenials! Some of which have now arrived and advice seems to be plant the bulbs together in clumps.
    So thought could do that in the garden and in perhaps a few containers as well.

    The garden is a terraced garden.
    Yes I think I will order plug plants in the spring. Have joted down your advice.
    We do usually put annuals in the containers but RL crept in this year and it never happened. So just thought the tete-a-tete daffs would look good in one.
    Thank you

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    I must admit I plant very few annual flowers now, I tend to focus my energy on the vegetables although I did plant a few nastertiums and marigolds this year as companion plants for the broad beans and carrots. I used to go mad and plant loads of beds with annuals and hanging baskets, etc. etc.

    One bit of planting we did a couple of years ago I am particularly pleased with and that is the climbing plants and shrubs we put along the fence. We spent time choosing and positioning them so we have flowers and berries for most of the year and different coloured foliage. Do you have room on your terracing for shrubs?

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Yes we do have room on the terracing for shrubs, your garden sounds so interesting.

    I do so like annuals but we spent such a lot of money year before last. Might still buy a few next year because they are lovely.
    I have always wanted a flat, bigger garden but that's not going to happen!


    We need to sort out some of our containers, some need breaking up etc as near to collapsing at the moment.

    I love the idea of vegetables and companion flowers as well.
    I would never have thought of that, great idea.


    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by sue (U8059472) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Firesprite= These are my thoughts on a terrace garden, I am rather excited about this, but hasten to add I am coming from my own perspective and can be ignored entirely. We never all agree in here and that's what I can find very useful and fun
    First flowers I would think about pollinator attractor bee friendly plants Marigold and nasturtiums may self seed or collect and pot up next year. Add Lavender also birds foot trefoil is a nitrogen fixer and will tumble down the terrace prettily.
    Next a perennial herb layer, creeping thyme with purple flowers will sprawl down stone. Chives will poke up between stones and are very cheerful. Sage is a good backdrop, Pop in other herbs as and when.
    Now more edibles, alpine strawberries will be lovely on a terrace covering area with pretty flowers tumbling down walls with tasty fruit
    Pop in a couple of comfrey plants in each layer as the leaves die they add nutrient into the soil and boost fertility
    You could then put in an occasional cauliflower amongst the rest.
    If you like the sound of edible gardening let me have more details and I can look up plants to suit your situation. Damp,dry,sun,shade thin soil etc

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by GuzziNut (U6364582) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Totally disillusioned, with all things gardening

    but checking in to wish David all the very best

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by sagethyme (U5272261) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    But remember gardens are for fun and peace as well.
    Today a friend visited who had never been here before. We just wandered out into the sunshine with our cups of tea. Not really warm enough to sit out, so just strolled around the lawn and under the trees.
    I felt so peaceful after a sometimes difficult week and hope you all get that peace from your gardens.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by sue (U8059472) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Guzzinut are you playing snap with Wartime farming. We have started listing what we haven't got its easier. I even know one of the tile maker experts

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Friday, 28th September 2012

    Thank you sue for your interest, much appreciated.
    I am noting down all the ideas!

    We have a small herb patch, small and patch being the operative words!
    Do like your ideas for the herbs.
    Could vegetables grow ok in containers? As just a bit short of space but would like to try.
    Our soil is very stony and isn't great to be honest. The back garden gets the sun when it appears!

    Lots to think about from both you and Nomad.
    Thank you very much.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Nomadnomore - XNo - Quiz Queen (U3180380) on Friday, 28th September 2012

    Leaps is the one to ask about container veg growing, what with the courtyard at the new sett and everything.

    (Aside and old cross threading alert) Leaps, did you ever move the jacuzzi after the Sett warming party or is it still there? (end Aside and alert).

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by SussexCornflower InTheFinalCountdown (U13833966) on Friday, 28th September 2012


    I grew stubby carrots in a large tub this year - very successful (and I hardly needed to water them because of all the rain).


    I was just looking to see what the two small plants were that I put in a pots/tubs last year for the Winter : I find they are artemisia and a carex called "evergold".

    Both lasted through the whole Winter without problem.

    The birds pulled at the artemisia in the Spring for their nests though!



    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Saturday, 29th September 2012

    Would love to try growing carrots, might try that in the Spring.

    Well. The Tete-a-Tete bulbs have now been put in a large container.
    The alliums have been spread between rockery plants etc.
    The tulips are in two containers. Didn't realise how deep these tulip bulbs had to be planted!
    You learn something every day!

    Next lot of perienals due later.

    One small step for mankind but a giant leap for me!

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by sue (U8059472) on Sunday, 30th September 2012

    Firesprite- I have consulted my books. What I have looked for is plants that do well in stony poor soil with sun. Also my own angle of useful plants that are edible and or bee/butterfly attractors.
    These are all perennial or self seeders.Easy care plants once they are established creating a basic background which you can add to each year with annuals
    What I had already said-Alpine strawberries,birds foot trefoil,creeping thyme,lavender
    Newbies-
    Red Valerian
    Harebells
    Fennel
    Lemon balm
    Cardoon
    St John wort
    Feverfew
    Rosemary

    For the low growing plants measure each terrace and work in 1meter square blocks use about 10 plugs to each meter block. Create gaps and some of he larger clump forming plants can fit in there. You should get a range of colour , herbs to eat and the buzz of flying insects

    I like questions

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by helena handcart (U14258601) on Sunday, 30th September 2012

    How can i make a barrel pond please. I have a half barrel and wuld love a pond

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by helena handcart (U14258601) on Sunday, 30th September 2012

    Hello David, sorry to hear of your bad news. You are a real inspiration and have given me lots of advice that I would not have got anywhere else. You are my "bright light" in the gardening world. Hope you are in better health soon.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Leaping Badger (U3587940) on Sunday, 30th September 2012

    I don't know, Helena, but it would be worth asking on this thread: www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb... - as I expect there are some pond experts there.
    'Ö'

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by helena handcart (U14258601) on Sunday, 30th September 2012

    thanks!

    I've been growing my own veg for about 7 years, and this has been the worst year so far. Flowers (mainly roses), salads and swiss chard have been the only things that have flourished;

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    sue, thank you so much for your research on my behalf, very much appreciated.

    All been noted.
    Great ideas, thanks.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by sagethyme (U5272261) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    Sue
    Great ideas and I will use a few as well.

    One word of warning though about St Johns Wort: thug....
    en.wikipedia.org/wik...
    We inherited lots of this along our shady front drive. Also known as Rose of Sharon (different to the North American plant of the same name in John Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath).
    It is very pretty for part of the year and we forgive it. Then we remember how it wants to take over, despairingly pull it up in handfuls, and it still creeps under the gravel and everywhere.

    Is there a better behaved relative for firesprite, Sue?

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by SussexCornflower InTheFinalCountdown (U13833966) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012


    I am a great fan of heuchera and tiarella - evergreen, variety of leaf colours and small spikey flowers that the bees and hover flies love.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Saturday, 6th October 2012

    Hi all, advice needed and would be very much appreciated...

    What can I put in hanging baskets over the autumn/winter?
    That would keep going and then when spring has sprung put a few annuals in?

    The hanging baskets are lying around in a corner in a right state.
    Awful!

    Thanks in advance.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by dens canis (U1983532) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Winter cyclamen are pretty good at keeping going until about March/April. You could mix them with violas or winterflowering pansies to soften your edges.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by firesprite (U14701118) on Monday, 8th October 2012

    Thank you dens canis, will definitely try that.

    I love cyclamen plants so will sort out my hanging baskets and get cracking!

    Report message50

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