The Village Hall  permalink

German Connection 5

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 1 - 50 of 2051
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Miladou bloody but unbowed (U3518248) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Having taken it upon myself to inaugurate the new thread, I'd like to start by thanking Nepete for her Hamburg post, which I've printed off and filed in my guidebook, ready for my next visit.

    I went to a meeting yesterday with the theme "Is Germany getting greener". The speaker, a Green, was very rude about Angela Merkel's turn round on nuclear power stations. It seemed a bit unfair to me, because I've done exactly the same thing. My scientist friend had just convinced me that nuclear was the only answer and then the Japanese earthquake happened.

    Surely, oldbloke, it's impossible to avoid the Soviet memorial, isn't it? In your face just doesn't do justice to it!

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Well, I wouldn't say it understates its case either miladou. But the one I mean is quite a way out - there is the very interesting, central one in the Tiergarten.

    The topic of the talk sounds a bit out of date, doesn't it? The Merkel decision makes very good business sense for Germany as they are world leaders in technology for alternative energy sources and the govt has invested loads of public money in R&D to keep market costs down. And anyway the concern about nuclear power goes deep into her own party - it's much less of a left-right division than it is in the UK.

    Merkel like much of German industry and banking has read the wrirting on the wall. Many of their counterparts in the UK haven't even found the wall yet. And the fact is that nuclear power won't find any finance in the future - the risks, both technical and politcal - are just too great. No-one will insure the plants either.

    I expect Germany will put its rivals in the EU under pressure too by introducing punitive regulations on safety for nuclear power plants which will make it less and less profitable to sell nuclear generated power.

    Good money can be made out of alternative power sources too.

    Of course Merkel hasn't yet overcome the politcal problems of a general closure. This is why she is trying to get a cross-party consensus on how it should be dealt with - time scale, who pays for closures etc etc. She seems to be doing quite well considering the enormity of the task. I detest much of her politics but Merkel is, in my opinion, one of the if not the most able politicians in Germany at the moment. Probably to do with the excellent education she recieved. (;

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Better than the education I "received" obviously.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Bearhug (U2258283) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Here you are!

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Miladou - Germany intends to consume nuclear power - just not to generate it.

    Perhaps the following will interest you?

    www.guardian.co.uk/c...


    You will not be surprised to hear that the events in Japan have changed my view of nuclear power.

    You will be surprised to hear how they have changed it. As a result of the disaster at Fukushima, I am no longer nuclear-neutral. I now support the technology.

    A crappy old plant with inadequate safety features was hit by a monster earthquake and a vast tsunami. The electricity supply failed, knocking out the cooling system. The reactors began to explode and melt down. The disaster exposed a familiar legacy of poor design and corner-cutting. Yet, as far as we know, no one has yet received a lethal dose of radiation.

    Some greens have wildly exaggerated the dangers of radioactive pollution. For a clearer view, look at the graphic published by xkcd.com. It shows that the average total dose from the Three Mile Island disaster for someone living within 10 miles of the plant was one 625th of the maximum yearly amount permitted for US radiation workers. This, in turn, is half of the lowest one-year dose clearly linked to an increased cancer risk, which, in its turn, is one 80th of an invariably fatal exposure. I'm not proposing complacency here. I am proposing perspective.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    @miladou & bearhug,

    thank you for carrying on from the old thread! (and covering for jane c....how could she leave and let the old thread come to an overflow.... Tsk.)

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Great concern to change at precisely 2000 may indicate assimilation into German thought patterns?

    Over on the Food boards there is a chat thread that also regenerates at 2000 - whoever manages to post the 2000th message gets the honour of restarting.- and naming - the baby.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Germany intends to consume nuclear power - just not to generate it. 
    That is your little secret, right?

    Yet, as far as we know, no one has yet received a lethal dose of radiation. 
    This is so cynical that it is almost funny......(but only just).
    For a clearer view, look at the graphic published by xkcd.com. It shows that the average total dose from the Three Mile Island disaster for someone living within 10 miles of the plant was one 625th of the maximum yearly amount permitted for US radiation workers. This, in turn, is half of the lowest one-year dose clearly linked to an increased cancer risk, which, in its turn, is one 80th of an invariably fatal exposure. 
    It is quite clear that the author has not the faintest idea what he is talking (writing) about.
    Just to give you a little hint: not only is the permissible radiation dose for workers calibrated to accommodate economical requirements, it is the dose averaged over five years with a fixed maximum and it excludes medical exposure. So if you don't mind moving house after five years* of exposure (quite apart from the difficulty of selling your property)....

    *....or earlier if you need medical treatment which will increase your dose


    oh and re
    look at the graphic published by xkcd.com 
    I wonder if Mr Monbiot has even bothered to check the credentials of that site....

    I am proposing perspective. 

    excellent idea

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Great concern to change at precisely 2000 may indicate assimilation into German thought patterns? 

    no, Organoleptic Icon, it was a joke....SOH-bypass on your side, perhaps?

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    nepete - My comment on the 2000 was also a joke - I thought evidently so!


    But I am deadly serious about nuclear power. The Germans have acknowledged that cancelled nuclear will be replaced by import of French nuclear generated power.

    Do you know who Monbiot is? Having him convert is like the Pope going Buddhist.

    IMHO trying to reduce CO2 is a waste of resources, but if you want to, Nuclear is the ONLY way.

    www.telegraph.co.uk/...

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    The Germans have acknowledged that cancelled nuclear will be replaced by import of French nuclear generated power. 
    Definitely not - the net contribution from nuclear power is to be cut down to zero. That is the only thing that could reasonably be achieved, unless we cut ourselves off from Eurogrid, which would cost even more energy and so would be counter-productive Do you know who Monbiot is? 
    yes....somebody who has studied history - first rate qualification for risk assessment.

    IMHO trying to reduce CO2 is a waste of resources, 
    let's agree to differ on that one

    but if you want to, Nuclear is the ONLY way. 

    and on that one.....do you know the carbon footprint of a kWh of electricity generated in a nuclear plant?
    Unless the figures for the UK are substantially lower, I don't know how you could arrive at the conclusion that it is the only way.
    .

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    << but if you want to, Nuclear is the ONLY way.

    and on that one.....do you know the carbon footprint of a kWh of electricity generated in a nuclear plant?
    Unless the figures for the UK are substantially lower, I don't know how you could arrive at the conclusion that it is the only way. >>

    Here is the official neutral answer re footprints in the UK.
    www.parliament.uk/do...

    I'm probably being thick here, but what can "net contribution from nuclear power is to be cut down to zero" MEAN? If ANY power is from nuclear how can it be netted off?

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Here is the official neutral answer re footprints in the UK. 

    official - yes, neutral - with figures provided by British Energy.....now you are joking
    I'm probably being thick here, but what can "net contribution from nuclear power is to be cut down to zero" MEAN? If ANY power is from nuclear how can it be netted off? 
    By comparing home production with home consumption; if we generate all the energy we need from conventional or renewable sources, then there will be no net contribution from nuclear power to our energy supply.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    nepete - whatever the source, it takes real effort to get nuclear matching fossil fuel in CO2 terms.

    << By comparing home production with home consumption; if we generate all the energy we need from conventional or renewable sources, then there will be no net contribution from nuclear power to our energy supply. >>

    That is true provided you generate all the energy you need WHEN you need it. But if in midwinter the wind does not blow and the sun does not shine, you WILL be using French Nuclear power.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    That is true provided you generate all the energy you need WHEN you need it. 
    exactly

    But if in midwinter the wind does not blow and the sun does not shine 

    of course the wind blows - and generates electricity - and of course the sun is shining - where do you think Germany lies - beyond the polar circle?

    you WILL be using French Nuclear power. 

    No.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    I think Germany is closer to the North Pole than it is to the equator, so that in winter there is sun for only a few hours a day; at an oblique angle, assuming there is no cloud.

    And that in winter there often IS cloud. And often in winter the wind does NOT blow. And when it does blow sometimes it does so too fast.

    Apparently Germany now importing lots of French power. 95% of it nuclear.

    notrickszone.com/201...

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    , so that in winter there is sun for only a few hours a day; at an oblique angle, assuming there is no cloud. 

    you don't need "sunshine" for PV, just light.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    whooops, pressed "post" before finishing my message

    And often in winter the wind does NOT blow. And when it does blow sometimes it does so too fast. 
    Wind energy generation in winter is more reliable than in summer. What you write is not substantiated by meteorological data.
    Apparently Germany now importing lots of French power. 95% of it nuclear. 
    No. Germany is a net exporter of electricity. The chart given in your link is just a local "snap shot".
    If you like to think that nuclear power has a carbon footprint of less than 4 g/kWh and that the term "net contribution" is meaningless, be my guest.
    Nobody is forcing the U.K. or any other country to abandon nuclear power, as long as you have the guts to store the long term waste next to your living quarters.
    Here, nobody is really prepared to do that, so we are trying to get out of nuclear energy. As the English saying goes. the proof of the pudding ......

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    Nepete I think we may as well agree to disagree, as I know I'm right and you think you are!

    But I've been in or very near to Germany many times in winter when there is no wind due to stable high pressure.

    And in UK same applies.

    www.therecycletimes....

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by nepete (U11290337) on Sunday, 19th June 2011

    as I know I'm right 

    it is good to read that you know something.

    But I've been in or very near to Germany many times in winter when there is no wind due to stable high pressure. 

    Highly scientific method of gathering met data........on par with the rest of your info.

    I think we may as well agree to disagree, 
    now there is finally something we can agree upon.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Garde_Champetre (U14354428) on Monday, 20th June 2011

    nepete

    thanks so much for your list of Hamburg tips for visitors on the previous German thread.

    Much appreciated.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by I love Emmett (U14347802) on Monday, 20th June 2011

    Just jumping in to say 'Hi' on the new thread.. been vaguely (but only vaguely glancing through the nuclear power debate above. I must say, down here in the middle of Germany we get quite a lot of brilliant sunny days in winter, and there are plenty more further south towards the Alps and the other mountains (rubbish at geography so can't remember the name of that climbing region (Swiss Franc something or other..). When I lived up north we didn't have a great deal of bright sunny winter days, but we sure had plenty of wind - so while I don't know the technical details of how much is needed to produce power, we are certainly not in an arctic wasteland in winter. Near where I live is a large windfarm (I say near, it's a few kms away as I am in the city) - I love driving through and seeing the towering graceful windmills. Bring 'em on, say I.

    Where is Jane C BTW? Strange silence from up north... hope all is well.

    Aunt Lula

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Bearhug (U2258283) on Monday, 20th June 2011

    Isn't Jane on hols?


    Haven't heard from tilly for ages - has anyone else?

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Monday, 20th June 2011

    << Haven't heard from tilly for ages - has anyone else? >>


    Maybe "she take de money and run Venezuela"?

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011

    The biggest collection of wind machines I know of in Germany is located in the Reichstag Building and is called the Bundestag.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011

    Britische Arkitekt?


    Doesn't it actually have some venting system for rising hot air?

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011

    Yes, state of the art environmental technology. The main feature is of course the transparent dome which which you go round on a slow spiral ramp and the recorded guide switches on automatically at certain points. It's free to go in, though I don't know if it's reopened to Joe Public after a terrorist scare. NePeTe wil know.

    The whole area is full of incredible modern buildings all of which have a colloquial nickname. Very witty, just like the Berliners.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011

    Haben sie eine erotische Gurke?





    (Have they got an erotic gherkin)

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011

    They have a pregnant oyster.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011

    They should go together like wurst and senf?

    Apparently we're all German - unless we're Welsh.

    www.telegraph.co.uk/...

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Thursday, 23rd June 2011

    In a perverse way, I welcome articles like that because they provide such compelling evidence for some points I (amongst others) occasionally make in TB - invoking immediate accusations of "anti-Englishness". The fact that most of the posters there apparently have no idea what I'm getting at puts the matter to bed.


    BTW I have plans to visit Weimar and retrace George Eliot's and George Lewes's time there.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by cranberrymuffin (U14686184) on Saturday, 25th June 2011

    Hello, I was wondering if anyone could help me out, I need to know the going rate for translation work? Or perhaps someone may know where I could find out? Thank you.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Dunlurkin NL (U2675855) on Saturday, 25th June 2011

    Hello, I was wondering if anyone could help me out, I need to know the going rate for translation work? Or perhaps someone may know where I could find out? Thank you. 

    How long is a piece of string?

    That's not a very helpful answer, but the price depends on a number of factors, incl.:

    - language combination
    - difficulty of the text
    - urgency
    - amount of previous/refernce material available
    - country you are working in/for.

    I have a feeling that the rate in Germany for German to English is about €1.15 + VAT per line (with a line being 55 characters).

    I was recently offered €0.13 per word (source text) for French to English. I think that is quite low, but maybe I'm spoiled. (I couldn't take it anyway, so the price wasn't an issue.) (I am in NL.)


    If Dame Celia happens along, she will be able to give you more information.

    Dunlurkin

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Saturday, 25th June 2011

    The going rate for writing an episode of the Archers is £875.. But that may not help much.

    I suppose you could get rates by asking online services to quote for similar work?

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by I love Emmett (U14347802) on Saturday, 25th June 2011

    "BTW I have plans to visit Weimar and retrace George Eliot's and George Lewes's time there."

    OB2 - when are you coming to Weimar - I'm only the next stop on the train if you want to have a coffee or such like..

    I'm curious about George Eliot's time there - what did she do in the area? I suppose I can go do a bit of internet searching...

    Aunt Lula

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Saturday, 25th June 2011

    I'm not sure of the dates yet, but this year. I'll let you know when things firm up.

    George Eliot and George Lewes left England for Weimer shorty after they became lovers. They spent several months there. She wrote an essay Three Months in Weimar.They couldn't marry because George Lewes was married and couldn't get a divorce for fascinating reasons. Their relationship of course caused tremendous repercussions in their circle of friends and especially in GE's family.

    They went there so that G Lewes could complete his research for his Life of Goethe, including talking to people who had actually known Goethe. They met everybody who was anybody, revelling in the more relaxed liberal artmosphere. She was one of the few intellectuals at that time who wrote about German literature. They even met Liszt, who played on the old Johanna for them. GE was a very accomplished pianist herself but was knocked out by Liszt.. He also lived in an illicit relationship, which didn't seem to bother anyone, and his "wife" was not a beauty which may have endeared GE to him further, as her own beauty is only appreciated by very few of us.

    We know quite a lot about their time in Weimar because that part of her Journal has survived. I'll be re-reading it again in a few weeks time.

    Don't start me off on George Eliot. I have to get up early tomorrow.


    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by I love Emmett (U14347802) on Sunday, 26th June 2011

    All very fascinating and I look forward to your visit to the area and learning more. The whole place is going a bit Liszt mad at the moment and of course, there is always wall-to-wall Goethe. ... this is the tree that inspired him, this is the coffee bean he once roasted, this is the garden he once walked through, round, across, nowhere near etc... Sometimes one feels it is possible to escape but then suddenly there is another little plaque saying what Goethe did here or there. I guess it's like living in Stratford! Hard to imagine Weimar being thought of as a hugely liberal place to come to - it always strikes me as a very 'klein-karriert' (not sure about spelling).

    Strangely, G.E. came up in conversation this weekend - went for a stroll with some friends and we found ourselves in some valley or other - there are lots of old mills in the woods around so we walked from one to the next along the banks of a lovely sunlit-dappled path. As we approached the next renovated old mill house we got into vague memories of Mill on the Floss and began trying to piece together what we knew - which was very little!

    Hope to meet and learn...

    Aunt Lula

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Monday, 27th June 2011

    I heard something interesting about Liszt the other day; that he had his hands operated on to increase his finger span to improve his piano playing. The skin between the fingers was removed, as I was told. There's a picture or model of his hand in his museum which illustrates this. I can't vouch for that but it's one of the things I'll be checking in Weimar. It's Liszt year, isn't it?

    The mill was based on two locations really. One wasSouth (Arbury) Farm, where she was born. But the river there couldn't produce the flood that did for Maggie and Tom. That had to be a tidal river so she visited Gainsborough and probably based St Oggs's river on the Trent there. She always did massive amounts of research ´for her books to get things right.

    Many scenes are set in locations of her childhood near Nuneaton, which I also know well because I was born and grew up in that vicinity.

    The thing I dislike about the book is the title - so static, a good title for a painting. Her publisher suggested it. She should have called the book Maggie Tulliver, I think.

    It's obviously imperfect as a novel - compared to Middlemarch, for example - but it contains some great writing. The Dodson sisters are a scream and are based on her real-life aunts.

    We have houses on the river with mill wheels here but they were small workshops (Kotten) and the river provided energy for the grindstones before electricity came. One or two are still operable. There's something really impressive I think about the simplicity and harmony of the way power is tranferred from the beautiful river to the useful work process on the knives. Fortunately these days they are appreciated and preserved.

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by cranberrymuffin (U14686184) on Monday, 27th June 2011

    Thank you very much Dunlurkin for the information

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Monday, 27th June 2011

    Blooming nervous wreck, here, I'm supposed to be at the Shakespeare play but the car I'm supposed to be driving in is stuck ina traffic jam 50 miles away!

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Miladou bloody but unbowed (U3518248) on Monday, 27th June 2011

    Fingers crossed!

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Tuesday, 28th June 2011

    And it worked, miladou. At 5 to 7 the car arrived and I got there in plenty of time for the play - though I missed the pre-performance treats, a picnic and a talk by the producer, who is also producer at the RSC I hear.

    The play was brilliant, highly imaginative and skilful production and acting. Off to see Richard the Third in a week or so. Will be travelling by public transport.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Dame_Celia_ Molestrangler (U14257909) on Wednesday, 29th June 2011

    I have a feeling that the rate in Germany for German to English is about €1.15 + VAT per line (with a line being 55 characters).

    I was recently offered €0.13 per word (source text) for French to English. I think that is quite low, but maybe I'm spoiled. (I couldn't take it anyway, so the price wasn't an issue.) (I am in NL.)




    Depends on whom you are doing it for.

    Direct client.. then yeah, you could get €1.15 a line. But if it's not a company, i.e. if it's a private individual, then they might baulk at that.

    For agencies, I get between €0.65 a line of 55 keystrokes (that includes punctuation and every time you hit the space bar) and €0.80 a line. Sometimes more for a fast turnaround. I might get either 50% more or even 100% more. That is, however, rare.

    When it comes to words, I get 1 cents per word in the source text from one agency. Most of them calculate by lines of 55 keystrokes in the target language.

    My minimum charge is €15.

    I have to charge 19% VAT.



    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Wednesday, 29th June 2011

    << €0.65 a line of 55 keystrokes (that includes punctuation and every time you hit the space bar >>

    So can you submit everything double spaced, for clarity?

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Dame_Celia_ Molestrangler (U14257909) on Thursday, 30th June 2011

    Unfortunately not.

    I learnt touch-typing at school on manual typewriters. In those days, you were taught to leave two spaces at the end of each sentence for clarity's sake.

    These days, because computers automatically do the spacing for you, you're only supposed to leave one space after a sentence. I've had to adapt.

    Bang goes a couple of extra cents, eh? smiley - winkeye

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Thursday, 30th June 2011

    Indeed if you DO leave two spaces the danged poota usually cuts one of them out.

    Though you can probably train it to double space after a "."?

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by Dame_Celia_ Molestrangler (U14257909) on Friday, 1st July 2011

    No need to train it to do that. And it is possible to leave gaps between words, too. I have to check texts very carefully and can automatically see where there are two spaces between words.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Friday, 1st July 2011

    I suspect it is a matter of making the default of "Eliminate multiple spacing" OFF where it comes as ON.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by oldbloke2 (U2285767) on Friday, 1st July 2011

    Is this space between words a Welsh thing?

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Bearhug (U2258283) on Friday, 1st July 2011

    No, it's how everyone used to be taught to type. Single space between words, double space at the end of a sentence. I still type like that, whatever the software I'm using does with it.

    Report message50

Back to top

About this Board

Welcome to the Archers Messageboard.

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.

This messageboard is now closed.

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.