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Newsnight Food Bank report

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Messages: 151 - 160 of 160
  • Message 151

    , in reply to message 123.

    Posted by sthilda (U3612164) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Not to mention that some people do not have a signal and have to have paid services.. 

    That's not the case. The whole of the Uk is now digital. Noone is forced to use a subsciption service. 
    Yes it is the case. A relative of mine cannot get a signal except via cable...

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  • Message 152

    , in reply to message 150.

    Posted by Peneli (U14304799) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    The Trussell Trust food bank I've taken stuff into does list pulses, and I try to find canned versions, as I assume that cooking power may be short as well as the food to cook. I only take in red lentils as they need only short cooking. It's a bit of a problem that the most economical foods need more time and energy to cook (and using slow cookers or hay box clones might lead to forgetting to boil the pulses for the necessary time. I poisoned myself once, thinking that red kidney beans were the only problem.)

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  • Message 153

    , in reply to message 151.

    Posted by Rongai route (U14673580) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Yoyr relative should complain in that case. Freeview is available acrsoss the whole UK

    www.digitaluk.co.uk/...

    Report message3

  • Message 154

    , in reply to message 153.

    Posted by Morganish (U9108847) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Actually, there was something on the radio the other day about this new generation of 4G phones interfering with peoples' ability to receive Freeview. Yes - I wasn't imagining it:

    'Nearly two million homes face disruption to their digital TV signal because of interference from new mobile services, with fears that a government help scheme to combat the problem will prove inadequate.
    About 1.9 million households – all with digital terrestrial TV service Freeview – will suffer interference from the next generation of mobile services (4G) which could come online by the end of this year.'

    That's how it's reported in the Guardian.

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  • Message 155

    , in reply to message 153.

    Posted by Finlay (U14286288) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    For a some people in some areas digital is in practical terms a non starter-I know from personal experience=-I could spend quite a few quid .c 1k and probably. but not definitely get it-digital signal is really all or nothing-analogue was not

    Report message5

  • Message 156

    , in reply to message 143.

    Posted by Borsetshire Blue (U2260326) on Sunday, 4th November 2012

    That's interesting. My reference to supermarkets was prompted by reading this Guardian article www.guardian.co.uk/s... (which is about Coventry) which contains this

    "A local supermarket has delivered a load of stock just about to reach its sell-by date (it doesn't want to be named, to avoid getting caught up in discussion of the merits of giving food that is about to go off to the hungry) and today it is offloading industrial quantities of iced buns, which several families take home by the dozen." - so presumably the Trussell trust includes supermarkets in the definition of the public (which seems fair enough). 


    I spent part of yesterday working at my local Foodbank Fee and the Coventry Foodbank was a hot topic of conversation. There had been a BBC programme about it during the week and a colleague suggested that I watch it on iPlayer, which I have just done - here's the link www.bbc.co.uk/iplaye...

    I don't know why they chose the Coventry Foodbank but the programme stated clearly near the start that the Coventry Foodbank is different from all of the other Foodbanks because they do accept non-perishable donations and donations from supermarkets.

    In Coventry they had clearly moved away from all of the Trussell Trust guidelines and left themselves open to being conned as well as clearly showing favouritism and giving 'extras' to people they judged to be most "deserving".

    The caption shown during the closing credits said >>Since the programme was filmed, Coventry Foodbank have revised their system of voucher checking to match guidelines set by the Trussell Trust.<<

    The Coventry example was nothing like the Foodbank that I volunteer at and I am so glad to see that they have revised their procedures and hope this clears up any remaining confusion about the Trussell Trust's attitude to 'donations' from supermarkets.

    Report message6

  • Message 157

    , in reply to message 156.

    Posted by Morganish (U9108847) on Sunday, 4th November 2012

    I'm glad that you saw the issues of coercion and favouritism in the documentary that I saw: others don't appear to have done so. I guess the only fair way of using fresh food is to do what other charities do - collect it, turn it into meals and then distribute it.

    It would be interesting to discover how the Coventry system arose.

    Report message7

  • Message 158

    , in reply to message 157.

    Posted by Borsetshire Blue (U2260326) on Sunday, 4th November 2012

    I'm glad that you saw the issues of coercion and favouritism in the documentary that I saw: others don't appear to have done so. I guess the only fair way of using fresh food is to do what other charities do - collect it, turn it into meals and then distribute it.

    It would be interesting to discover how the Coventry system arose. 

    I certainly saw the favouritism, Morganish. Some people being given food when they hadn't been given a voucher, some having 'extras' tucked away in reserve for them, some being challenged about whether they *needed* the voucher they'd presented - all completely unacceptable and they do not happen at my local Foodbank. The Trussell Trust guidelines are designed to protect people, both those donating the food and those in need.

    The favouritism was bad enough but I was sickened to see the poor woman who was persuaded to attend that Christian rally standing on stage while the Coventry organiser said how great god was and urging some dignitary to symbolically 'feed' her in front of the cameras.

    That would never happen here either but it seems the guy running the scheme in Coventry was able to do as he pleased ... until the programme maker confronted him with the truth that god must have misled him about whether his favourite client was really as "deserving" as he seemed.

    Report message8

  • Message 159

    , in reply to message 156.

    Posted by Fee (U3534148) on Sunday, 4th November 2012

    That's very interesting, thanks, BB.

    I wonder how the Coventry one came to be the one featured in both the Guardian article and on the BBC - particularly if they knew that it wasn't following a standard pattern - looking for good television, perhaps, rather than the best information.

    Report message9

  • Message 160

    , in reply to message 158.

    Posted by Morganish (U9108847) on Sunday, 4th November 2012

    Thanks, BB. I was beginning to winder if I'd imagined that poor woman and her son, dragged to the religious meeting to be held up as an example of god's love. So easy to very subtly imply to people that if they go along to something like that and undergo the humiliation, they won't have to worry about going hungry again.

    The other thing that I found shocking was the fact that some clients were allowed to go into, or at least look into, the fresh food store and effectively pick what they wanted. This is what I meant about professionalism in my posts. The Coventry group had clearly strayed way off the professional path.

    Report message10

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