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Freddie's rising trot. Are the SWs having a laugh, Tayler,

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Messages: 1 - 43 of 43
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Monday, 12th December 2011

    ..and making a joke, on purpose?

    As another poster said "We have been assured by Ms Tayler that Freddie is a good rider, and that he was "gripping with his heels" at the gallop in order to gee his pony on, not in order to try to stay on.

    We know that he has won the jumping at a gymkhana.

    We know that he has gone out with the hunt and gained the commendation of the Master.

    Why then was he so triumphant today about doing a rising trot, wanting to draw it to his mother's attention and make sure that she had noticed?"

    and I supported him by writing "be assured that it is as ridiculous as if Freddie had won the long jump at the school sports, gained a commendation from the games master for his performance on the rugby field, then said, on the village green, "Look, Mummy - I can run without falling over!""

    People are confident at rising trot long, long before they would ever be expected to jump, (even if being led over the jumps by their auntie)

    Please, Taylor, are the SWs doing this deliberately?

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    I've been trying hard to think of a reason why Adrian Flynn might have have done this NOT as a deliberate wind-up, but by mistake and all I can come up with is this scenario as a possible illustration.

    Imagine (you'll have imagine quite hard) that someone had to write a script about driving, and, for some reason or another, had never driven or closely observed someone driving - they might know that a driver (usually) has to "change gear", but not realised that a "change of gear using the clutch" is learnt, usually, long before a clutchless change, and quite a few people never do clutchless changes from choice anyway (I could do one on a motorbike, between the higher gears, if I had plenty of time, but that was it)

    It is just possible, in my opinion, that the SW has done a tiny bit of internet research about riding, seen the term "rising trot" and thought that this was slightly advanced, and something that you might bring to your mother's attention if you were trying to please her. There was a lot of the script that was quite subtle, I thought)

    (It's actually your basic trot, in the European style of riding - for example, in dressage, it's only on the 4th level of British Dressage that sitting trot is required, rather than optional)

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Mustafa Grumble (U8596785) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    If that was Freddie's reaction to a rising trot, I cannot wait for next week's thrilling instalment when he demonstrates to Lizzie that he can now tie his own shoelaces ... without sticking his tongue out of the side of his mouth in concentrated effort.

    I want to know what Caspar's half-pass is like. Must be off pat by now.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    Levade this week, MG.

    Do keep up.

    Actually, we have to be careful making pleasant Archers-related chit-chat on this thread - the "Taylor, why on earth is Shula leading Freddie over jumps?" thread got moved from N+Qs to DTA without ever getting an answer via the Team.

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by sunnysakasredux (U14979019) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    Dear carrickx I think the SWs are having a laugh. I only heard about this today on a hack with the 2 most avid archers listeners amongst the happy hackers ( a horsey person like you will know why they are nicknamed the happy hackers!) they thought it was unbelievable! But I think we have the horses back in the programme, possibly against some scriptwriters' will so we are being made to pay with their disregard for all things horse related. I fully expect to hear that Freddie is going to take his father's place in the next team chasing event! I mean if you can rise to the trot, gallop while gripping your heels and swivelling your head, etc... team chasing will be well within Fred's skill range!

    I think it is the s/ws having a bubble (joke!) at the horse crew's expense.
    I lost my reins and stirrups this am while turning around to talk to someone. The Happy Hackers called me Freddie for the rest of the hack!
    I didn't listen last night will try to listen this afternoonxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by mike (U14258103) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    >>>If that was Freddie's reaction to a rising trot, I cannot wait for next week's thrilling instalment when he demonstrates to Lizzie that he can now tie his own shoelaces ... without sticking his tongue out of the side of his mouth in concentrated effort.<<<

    Based on what we have heard from Freddie on the programme so far I would say it is extremely likely that (like his dad before him) he would be quite incapable of tieing his own shoelaces. (As true aristocrats, they must have a servant that does that, surely?)

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Radio Four (U14496451) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    I cringed when I heard it. I did wonder if Fredders had become a bit of a dressage fiend in the short time he has been riding, and wanted to comment on what superb paces Casper has. Then the SW accidentally stuffed a "rising" in his mouth.

    Lizzie said that the current owner wanted to make sure the pony was ok with Fredders before selling him. Surely then she would not let someone who has just learnt rising trot, to ride him without someone knowledgeable watching.

    I wait for next week's installment. "Look mum, I'm on the correct diagonal now!"

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Tuesday, 13th December 2011

    Ironically, if the SW took out the " my rising" and substituted "this", we'd all be triply impressed, with the correct terminology, the fact that Freddie was commenting on his pony's paces in true dressage fiend style, and the accuracy, in that Welshies, of all types, are known for their superb,elevated, punchy trot.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by petal jam (U1466691) on Thursday, 15th December 2011

    Carrick this has to be a deliberate tease by the SWs. Even I mastered rising to the trot, aged about seven, after a few afternoons on a friend's welsh mountain [black, white nose, name of Peggy] and honestly I can't ride at all and was so allergic that I was forbidden to go anywhere near a curry comb.

    The only way to understand the tale of the boy and his horse is to assume that the authority consulted was a volume of Thelwell residing in an ancient downstairs loo at a holiday cottage.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Thursday, 15th December 2011

    The only way to understand the tale of the boy and his horse is to assume that the authority consulted was a volume of Thelwell residing in an ancient downstairs loo at a holiday cottage.
     

    That is pure, coruscating (I do love that word) brilliance, PJ.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Our_Freda (U4239986) on Thursday, 15th December 2011

    Genius, agreed. Thelwell in the downstairs loo, and at best, a look at that dreadful made up life in the country column in Country Living that was the result of the blogging competition which no one good won and the editor parachuted in her friend from Tooting Bec who makes it all up extremely unconvincingly.

    I second carrick bend's call for clarity with regard to Freddie's prowess in the saddle - if you could just quite simply tell us which Pony Club tests he's passed, we'll be happy. Well ... we might ask to speak to his DC just to be sure, but it would be a start.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Friday, 16th December 2011

    What a sensible idea, OF.

    Trouble is, you come up against the "dual-standard" thing again - from Freddies pride in his rising trot, I'd say he's either just done or is ready to do D Standard, while part of the riding requirements are "Be able to ride a quiet pony safely, in an enclosed area without the leading rein, in walk and trot."

    www.pcuk.org/index.p...

    Galloping and jumping come a bit later.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Monday, 19th December 2011

    Bump.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by aquaticDougal (U3480367) on Wednesday, 21st December 2011

    As "variable" as Freddie's equine skill-set obviously is, this is only one of the smaller problems for dear Caspar.

    Imagine please a crisp morning when Freddie announces that he will pop out for a trot/gallop/canter/walk/lead around the grounds.
    How long will this trip be?
    The original largish Victorian family house sized Boundary? 5 Min's?
    Or
    The current vast Blenheim Palace-esque Wildebeest roaming acreage? 2 days?

    You see, as with Lizzie's legality to drive, secret words between Nigel & David ...... EVERYTHING to do with LL is flexible (when it suits!)
    So Freddie being a complete numpty one week & entering Daddy's beloved steeplechase the next .... is about par for the (changeable) course!

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Wednesday, 21st December 2011

    I've started a thread in DTA which refers to this enigma -

    "Feddies riding - the grand paradox",

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    to try to make it clear that "His competence dips and rises on a vast roller-coaster - it's not some trivial technical terminology thing, but a total inconsistency, carried on over since it was decided that Freddie should be seen to be riding, if he was to follow in his fathers footsteps".

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Tayler Cresswell (U14232848) on Wednesday, 21st December 2011

    Hi We_Freda_Kings and carrick

    I second carrick bend's call for clarity with regard to Freddie's prowess in the saddle - if you could just quite simply tell us which Pony Club tests he's passed, we'll be happy. 

    We don't know which tests Freddie may have taken or passed - nothing has been mentioned to that effect on air. I have posted on one of your earlier threads that Freddie is an accomplished rider - and I have also passed on comments about Freddie's riding from the board,

    Tayler

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Buntysdaughter (U7084475) on Wednesday, 21st December 2011

    Thanks, c-b, will check it out ! Difficult for Freddie to follow in Nigel's footsteps when the child appears to spend much of his time looking over his shoulder, n'est ce pas, as dear Lily might say.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Thursday, 22nd December 2011

    I have posted on one of your earlier threads that Freddie is an accomplished rider - and I have also passed on comments about Freddie's riding from the board, 

    Yes, Tayler - on the 16th of September, you said, "I've had a response to the question - Freddie is a confident rider."

    #36 of the "why was poor Freddie "Gripping with his heels during a gallop"? thread.
    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    If Freddie is "an accomplished rider", the OP of this thread, "As another poster said "We have been assured by Ms Tayler that Freddie is a good rider, and that he was "gripping with his heels" at the gallop in order to gee his pony on, not in order to try to stay on.

    We know that he has won the jumping at a gymkhana.

    We know that he has gone out with the hunt and gained the commendation of the Master.

    Why then was he so triumphant today about doing a rising trot, wanting to draw it to his mother's attention and make sure that she had noticed?"

    and I supported him by writing "be assured that it is as ridiculous as if Freddie had won the long jump at the school sports, gained a commendation from the games master for his performance on the rugby field, then said, on the village green, "Look, Mummy - I can run without falling over!""

    People are confident at rising trot long, long before they would ever be expected to jump, (even if being led over the jumps by their auntie)

    Please, Taylor, are the SWs doing this deliberately?", and post 2 of it, are even more relevant.

    (Although I can't speak for Freda, I interpreted her request to know which Pony Club tests Freddie had passed as taking for granted your comment that "We don't know which tests Freddie may have taken or passed - nothing has been mentioned to that effect on air" and not so much a literal request for the specific (and unavailable) information, but another attempt to discover whether Freddie is indeed meant to be "accomplished", when he seems to be dragged back, intermittently, to basics that I (and probably Freda) cannot recall having learnt, as I would guess that you cannot recall having learnt to run.

    We have no doubt that the SWs INTEND him to be perceived as accomplished, but the factual information they are giving out, intermittently, is either a deliberate joke, or accidentally very wrong.

    (There's stuff like "too much straw" in the broadcast episode and "too much hay" in the synopsis, and the very concept of a 12 year olds first Welsh pony being stabled, that I'm not going to ask about, as those details pale into insignificance beside the question posed by this thread.)

    You are, as always, the epitome of charm and tact, Tayler.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Dorcas Scones (U9339340) on Thursday, 22nd December 2011

    Maybe it's all being set up for another tragic event and he will falll off, having become over confident. He will then be known as 'Deddie Pargetter.'

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Thursday, 22nd December 2011

    Oh dear, Ms Tayler; rising to the trot simply is not a very difficult or accomplished thing to do. Boasting about it to his mummy would be appropriate in a child so young he has to be taken around on a leading rein, but is not in the least appropriate in someone of eleven who is an accomplished rider.

    Freddie is being shown as somewhat like a chap of eleven boasting to his mother that he has managed to walk upstairs instead of crawling.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Thursday, 22nd December 2011

    Boasting about it to his mummy would be appropriate in a child so young he has to be taken around on a leading rein 

    Freddie DID have to be taken around on a leading rein, though, months after he'd won a jumping class, an galloped around at Pony Club camp - but he was, apparently, an "accomplished rider" throughout.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Thursday, 22nd December 2011

    That was what I meant, c-b; since Ms Tayler repeatedly assures us that he is meant to be a competent rider, the infantilising is very poor editorial decision.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Thursday, 22nd December 2011

    Fishy, I know that one of the two alternatives I gave in the first 2 posts of this thread have to be write - either the SWs are having a laugh, or they have, collectively, made a mistake.

    There is no other alternative.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by barwick_green (U2668006) on Friday, 23rd December 2011

    < the infantilising is very poor editorial decision. >

    It was but one of many in the last year. 2011 will not be one of TA's golden years given that it started with Ambridge being bored to the core and ending in the stultifying hen/stag party episode (for which the scriptwriter should next be writing his resignation.)

    The nuns in Prestatyn have wilder nights out than Nic & co and Will's stag night was rutting tedious to listen to but would, in real life, have been even more tedious to have attended.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Friday, 23rd December 2011

    We have to be careful, BG, making general Archers-related comment, I think, otherwise this thread could, like the "Taylor, why on earth is Shula leading Freddie over jumps?" thread,
    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...
    get moved from N+Qs to DTA without ever receiving a satisfactory answer.

    Do you think that Freddie is indeed portrayed as an "accomplished rider", or are you too rather confused?

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Friday, 23rd December 2011

    I have posted on one of your earlier threads that Freddie is an accomplished rider  

    Ian is an accomplished chef - I can't see him saying "Caroline, look, I can boil potatoes!"

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Tuesday, 27th December 2011

    So the line, today, is that Freddie's a good rider - the roller-coaster is on the way up after the last "dip" of the remarking on his rising trot.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Tuesday, 27th December 2011

    I though Shula said it, and she is the one who was coaching him over two small jumps on a leading rein, and took him out with the hunt on a leading rein, only a couple of months ago.

    He is clearly a very quick learner.

    Oh, except he was winning the jumping at the gymkhana a couple of months before that, so he is clearly a very quick forgetter to.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Our_Freda (U4239986) on Wednesday, 28th December 2011

    I would still like to know how the devil much straw he managed to get in a stable (which someone rather self consciously called a loose box) in order to compromise the ability of a welsh pony to get up. Was it still in bales?
    And why the devil did someone not point out that he wouldn't need to get up, as he'd probably have gorged himself to death on the damn stuff?

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Wednesday, 28th December 2011

    I've had Welsh ponies as well, Freda; my Section A(rig) was kept in the night before a show and we had to put a bar half-way up the top half of the stable door.

    People used to look in, expecting a fierce big stallion, and were surprised to see this angelic looking little thing.

    What they didn't know was that he could do a cotrolled rear in the stable, put his front legs over the half-door and then wriggle to freedom.
    I'd that you'd be looking at 3' depth of straw before there was any risk the pony couldn't get up.

    And why the devil did someone not point out that he wouldn't need to get up, as he'd probably have gorged himself to death on the damn stuff? 
    The synopsis says "too much hay", so he'd have been spoilt for choice.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Our_Freda (U4239986) on Wednesday, 28th December 2011

    Hay, straw, how can it matter. Agricultural advisor? What? Who?

    It's going to kill him anyway, if they keep it in, and give it six days off by way of a relocation package.

    Where are they going to turn it out. And with whom?

    Bung it loose in 60 acres of parkland, a la Black Beauty, so it can gallop joyfully to Freddie when he calls?

    (rather than needing a team of three, two on quads and one with a tazer to catch it ever again) (or a winch and tarp to drag it off having gone down with laminitis)

    And what's the betting, that just like all the other Archer nags, it neighs every time it clops onto set, and Freddie develops that bluddy 'whoa boy, good boy' habit his stupid auntie's got.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Wednesday, 28th December 2011

    Freddie develops that bluddy 'whoa boy, good boy' habit his stupid auntie's got. 
    We've been told he's an"accomplished rider" - that's all he needs to know, surely?

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Saturday, 31st December 2011

    Tayler, we really do wonder why an "accomplished rider" would remark on his rising trot - it is very, very strange - as strange as it would be if Ian said to Caroline "Look at this egg I've boiled" or Bert Fry might shout to David "Look, I can hitch up this plough to the tractor".

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Our_Freda (U4239986) on Sunday, 1st January 2012

    off at a slight tangent I was incandescent when Lizzie confided in Lily that Daddy didn't like the fox killing part really.

    'Oh, you're like granny, she never has approved of hunting' was fine, but it should have gone on 'but daddy believed it was a fairer and kinder way of controlling foxes, and better for conservation.'

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Sunday, 1st January 2012

    Yep, it struck me as either a lie or a wimp-out - Nigel was portrayed as a man of principle, if he really "didn't like the fox killing part" and didn't, as you posted "believed it was a fairer and kinder way of controlling foxes, and better for conservation", what sort of a hypocrite was he being an enthusiastic supporter of the Hunt before the Hunting Act anyway?

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Sunday, 1st January 2012

    It's the post-mortem Siddification re-writing fairy in action again, I think.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by sunnysakasredux (U14979019) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Dear Carrick I still think the same as my above postxxx But I am posting 'cos you asked and 'cos it was your birthday at Christmas and because I really don't think a 12year old accomplished rider of any sex would draw attention to their rising trot. Hello scriptwriters! I also think it is a bit of a cop out saying Nigel didn't like killing foxes. People who don't like foxes being ripped to shreds if they actually catch one, Don't ride to hounds. They go on different types of hunts ie the ones without hounds, the sort I went on on Christmas Eve you catch human hares!
    Nigel hunted 'cos he was a country person he probably liked the buzz and thought it was a humane way to cull foxes. The scriptwriters are running trying to have it both ways.
    If Freddy is accomplished he would probably, given his background, be on about his 3rd pony by now and unless he was into dressage would probably not even think about his rising trottx
    Respect to the Queen riding without a hat in public now there is an accomplished rider and I am a republican but respect for her equestrian skillsxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Nigel hunted 'cos he was a country person he probably liked the buzz and thought it was a humane way to cull foxes. The scriptwriters are running trying to have it both ways. 
    Couldn't have put it better myself, Sunny.

    If Freddy is accomplished he would probably, given his background, be on about his 3rd pony by now and unless he was into dressage would probably not even think about his rising trot 
    Yes, I like the " not even think about his rising trot" bit - I think that, unless the SWs are indeed having a laugh, as this thread asks, that they don't seem to have realised that "rising trot" is like "walking without holding on to anything" - people who can walk, in an accomplished fashion, never draw attention to it, in my experience.

    Sunny, as a former 12 year old who was into dressage, it was my sitting trot that I had to think about a little; unless someone is just beginning and goes "clomp, clomp, clomp" on the poor pony's back every stride, you'd just take it for granted, most of the time, wouldn't you? (Unless you're slowing your rising to slow the trot to the rhythm you want, maybe).

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by sunnysakasredux (U14979019) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Yes carrick sitting trot is harder. Imagine you being keen on dressage all that plaiting and all the rest. Team chasing is my thingx Didn't Nigel team chase or am I remembering incorrectly ? I thought he did it with Alice and Shula. I think the s/ws are cross at having to bring the horses backx
    Dan rides it was in the other show. I am not convinced Freddy is an accomplished rider. I would like him to be but the s/ws keep making me think otherwise. I meant to say running with the hares and hunting with the hounds. Which is a favourite thing from the fox-hunting gran who thinks I am so wrong in not wanting to hunt with dogs and a liberal wuss etc.. etc.. I know all the arguments for and against but I just can't do it.
    But understand that it is more humane than shooting them and leaving them to a lingering death or letting them live off brake fluid which has happened. So No! S/Ws if Nigel was not keen he wouldn't have hunted. You can not fence sit (sorry poor pun) when it comes to hunting with dogs.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Wednesday, 4th January 2012

    Yes, Nigel did team-chase, with Alice, Shula and some else who I've forgotten, so he was portrayed as being fairly gung-ho.

    Imagine you being keen on dressage all that plaiting and all the rest. 
    Are you having a larf? When I was first riding Jem and was told that she was a big cob, I thought "Well, at least, cobs show with a hogged mane, so I'll never have to plait her".

    I am not convinced Freddy is an accomplished rider. I would like him to be but the s/ws keep making me think otherwise.  
    There you have the crux of this thread in a nutshell.

    It doesn't add up, does it?

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Thursday, 5th January 2012

    I have posted on one of your earlier threads that Freddie is an accomplished rider  
    Tayler, the above statement doesn't address the actual question posed by the OP of this thread, which was why, if he is intended by the SWs, as you have said previously, to be "an accomplished rider", he was drawing such a basic skill to his mothers attention?

    I actually asked "Are the SWs having a laugh, Tayler,and making a joke, on purpose?

    As another poster said "We have been assured by Ms Tayler that Freddie is a good rider, and that he was "gripping with his heels" at the gallop in order to gee his pony on, not in order to try to stay on.

    We know that he has won the jumping at a gymkhana.

    We know that he has gone out with the hunt and gained the commendation of the Master.

    Why then was he so triumphant today about doing a rising trot, wanting to draw it to his mother's attention and make sure that she had noticed?"

    and I supported him by writing "be assured that it is as ridiculous as if Freddie had won the long jump at the school sports, gained a commendation from the games master for his performance on the rugby field, then said, on the village green, "Look, Mummy - I can run without falling over!""

    People are confident at rising trot long, long before they would ever be expected to jump, (even if being led over the jumps by their auntie)

    Please, Taylor, are the SWs doing this deliberately? "

    Either they are, or they've made a mistake, as I wondered in #2.

    Is there another alternative?

    (Yes, this thread is rather tedious, isn't it? A bit like the "Gripping with the heels whilst galloping" one, and the "Being lead over jumps despite having previously won a first in the jumping class")

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Tayler Cresswell (U14232848) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    Hi cb

    I actually asked "Are the SWs having a laugh, Tayler,and making a joke, on purpose? 

    No, I don't think so.

    Tayler

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Sunday, 8th January 2012

    It did seem a possibility, as I would be a bit susceptible to being wound up, but I suppose it's a possible mistake to make, if they were trying to portray Freddie as accomplished; the Wiki entry for "trot" , says "There are three ways the trot may be ridden", then, in order, paragraphs for "sitting", "rising"and "two-point", so someone googling might think that rising trot was a more advanced thing to do.

    Thanks for coming back to this thread: hope you've had a good weekend,
    C-B

    Report message43

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