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You can feel the shame of Emma 'n Ed.

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Messages: 1 - 37 of 37
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by binocular (U10832169) on Wednesday, 14th November 2012

    They have hit rock bottom because of their pride. Who can blame them? At least the battled it out for a while.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by peter-francis (U14241999) on Wednesday, 14th November 2012

    thank heaven for someone with a bit of understanding of the situation, binocular. The same problem, aggravated by a quite understandable sense of shame is being played out in cities and in rural areas all over the country as we speak.

    Granted there are a few holes in the SL (viz the VW interview yesterday), but essentially the descent into the mire of desperation has been well-written and well acted by Emma. The relief in her voice was palpable tonight that not only did she get a lunch but also finally HAD to tell her mother.

    I give enough brickbats when they are due, but all in all this storyline and particularly the episode tonight deserve bouquets.

    P

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Lady Trudie Tilney Glorfindel Maldini (U2222312) on Wednesday, 14th November 2012

    Hear hear. There seems to be a certain amount of lack of imagination from some in here over how easy it is to tip over from 'just about managing' to 'completely in the mire'.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by peter-francis (U14241999) on Wednesday, 14th November 2012

    Very true, Ermintrude, and very often the understandable 'pride' merely makes things worse. Then along comes an unforeseen large expense like the car, a virtual necessity in rural areas, and over the edge you go.

    P

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    The story has been spoiled for me by no mention of benefits. But the acting is great.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Abby33 (U6428266) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Unfortunately the 'few holes' in the story line are massive craters! I think that it is an excellent story line, but badly researched.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by binocular (U10832169) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Just thinking about this SL. Neither of them, Emma imparticular went running to their parents asking for handouts.

    They didn't take the easy way out . Which is what a lot of couples would have done.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Shirley Knott (U14164156) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I agree there have been holes -nay, craters - in this storyline, but agree the acting has been great.

    That bit last night when Susan came to the food bank and realised Emma was there was heartrending - I was actually holding my breath (and as I was driving, this could have been a silly move!) It made me think how I would feel if I had found one of my daughters in there.

    Well done to the actors of Susan, Emma and Ed, but for goodness sakes can we now have some reality and some benefits.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by NewEssexWoman (U9776561) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Very true, Ermintrude, and very often the understandable 'pride' merely makes things worse. Then along comes an unforeseen large expense like the car, a virtual necessity in rural areas, and over the edge you go.


    I what way is a car more of a necessity than putting food on the table?

    20% of households in the UK don't have cars and I can't believe that all of them are in cities!

    Yes, life would be more awkward - George may have to walk to catch the bus to school. Emma and Ed may have to walk to work. Emma may have to organise to go shopping with Susan, Clarrie or Ruth even. All pretty inconvenient, I agree, but scarcely the end of the world.

    Both sets of parents live in the village, fgs!

    What is much more dire than not having a car is taking out a loan for which you have absolutely no means of repaying.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by fairy hedgehog (U1485678) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    > 20% of households in the UK don't have cars and I can't believe that all of them are in cities! <

    There are very few households in my village that don't have a car, but I do remember hearing a conversation in the summer when a man was saying that his car had broken down and he couldn't afford to get it fixed, so he was walking everywhere.

    I don't know if Ed needs a car for his work, but with family in the village I wouldn't expect Emma to put running a car before buying food. Being unable to make a big purchase is quite understandable and Emma could ask family to share trips to the supermarket.

    fh

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Abby33 (U6428266) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Well done to the actors of Susan, Emma and Ed, but for goodness sakes can we now have some reality and some benefits. 

    Well said!!

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Mustafa Grumble (U8596785) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    They have hit rock bottom because of their pride. Who can blame them? At least the battled it out for a while. 
    Well said, Binocular.

    I'm no great fan of The Glums, and view Ed as being the biggest S H one T in Ambridge, but - leaving aside the benefit potholes - this has been a very good SL and superbly acted (ditto Susan, Will & Nic).

    Their pride and determination to be independent and stand on their own two feet has contributed hugely to The Glums being this deep in the hole - and is why it is unfair of people to criticise the SL for being unrealistic in a small village with family living nearby.

    Emma was mortified when Susan approached - and tried weakly to suggest that it was not what it looked like - but her relief at not having to maintain the charade any longer was tangible. Even more so when it enabled her to make Ed sit down and face the facts.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Lynda rides a bike. Why can't other people? To have to walk everywhere in and out of the village might be healthy but time-consuming and rather restricting.

    So.....on yer bike.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by peter-francis (U14241999) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    < < it enabled her to make Ed sit down and face the facts. > >
    and, better still, to face the steak and kidney, Mustafa!

    P

    ps oh, and New Essex woman , it is an essential if, as Emma and Ed were, you are trying to put on a brave front and remain independent.. That is 'essential' as in 'essential to get to the nearest supermarket or work for Emma'. Would you have her walk to Brookfield and Lower Loxley in all weathers? It's looking more thomas Hardy-esque every moment. You can hide not having enough food but not having to give up your independence. Misguided priorities perhaps, and Emma sees that now, but understandable as a first reaction.

    PPS VW's decision not to 'do' benefits does really make the SL much less convincing, I agree.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by fairy hedgehog (U1485678) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    > Would you have her walk to Brookfield and Lower Loxley in all weathers? <

    That's what other cleaners do. I walk several miles every day, just for pleasure, but I used to regularly walk up the hill with Wendy in the morning. She was a woman from the council estate who had to walk to her cleaning job in the pub at the top of the hill.

    fh

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Mustafa Grumble (U8596785) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    A car is an essential for Ed - how else is he going to get out to the farmers' merchants, let alone the many things he has to do as part of his business? He might have access to a tractor at Grange Farm, but that's hardly practical for a quick trip to get some feed supplements or worming tablets.

    He /might/ just be able to manage without a 4x4 (and we don't know what they've purchased) but he would have to have at the very least a small estate car.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Longdknitter (U14881410) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Hello

    Agree interesting decision over benefits when there were long discussions about Clarrie claiming following her 'temporary' departure from Bridge Farm.

    Maybe the team feel they have done benefits!

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Then they should rethink. The story is spoiled by the fact benefits are never mentioned.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by toffee (U8026926) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Lynda rides a bike. Why can't other people? To have to walk everywhere in and out of the village might be healthy but time-consuming and rather restricting.

    So.....on yer bike.  

    I used to work nearly a mile away from where I live. As I worked split shifts there wasn't always a bus to catch - certainly not for the 6am start., and the bus stop was a long walk from work anyway. So I got a bike and biked it every day there and back in all weathers. I can still remember turning up frozen to the bone, drenched to the skin or covered in snow, depending on the weather, but it did me no harm. I always got there nearly an hour before I startef work to thaw out!

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by NewEssexWoman (U9776561) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Would you have her walk to Brookfield and Lower Loxley in all weathers? 

    Well, seeing as she lives on Brokefield land, then I would expect her to walk, whatever her income! As for LoLo (does she actually work there?) well how far away is it? Less than five miles, surely? And that's how far I used to cycle to work, five days a week, regardless of weather (other than in ice or snow when I would walk).

    It's not that difficult to survive without a car, particularly when you have oodles of family nearby - it simply requires a bit of imagination and organisation.

    Surviving without food, otoh, is slightly more difficult.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by toffee (U8026926) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Then they should rethink. The story is spoiled by the fact benefits are never mentioned. 

    It's bleedin' annoyin' to put it bluntly.

    Because the way they talk they clearly live on what Weirdo pays for George and what Ed and Emma earn, nothing else. They don't even mention child benefit, which they definitely get, unless they've been overlooked by the system! And with the way the writers are going about it, they probably were!

    What would they get for 2 kids? I haven't got kids and when my mum got 'family allowance' it was nothing for the eldest and 10 bob for the second (she had two). So I have no idea how much someone would get for 2 kids these days.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by NewEssexWoman (U9776561) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    A car is an essential for Ed - how else is he going to get out to the farmers' merchants, let alone the many things he has to do as part of his business? He might have access to a tractor at Grange Farm, but that's hardly practical for a quick trip to get some feed supplements or worming tablets. 

    Order on-line and have them delivered? And I'm sure he could come to some arrangement with Eddie for those rare occasions when use of a car is absolutely essential.

    I'm not suggesting that Ed'n'Em wouldn't be inconvenienced without a car - I'm sure they would be. But with a little bit of organisation they could easily get by.

    What they can't survive is taking out a loan for which they have no possibility of repaying or buying petrol when there is no food or money in the house.

    I just can't accept that buying a car was Ed'n'Em's top priority.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    20% of households in the UK don't have cars and I can't believe that all of them are in cities! 
    Twenty per cent is one in five; quite a large number, really. A household in the UK has an average of two and a half people in it, so taking the (low) figure of 60,000,000 for the population, that would be roughly 24,000,000 households of 2.5, of which twenty per cent would mean 4,800,000 people without access to a car. Worked out in a slightly different way it might be rather more: If you assume that carlessness is independent of household size, then the number of people without a car could be taken as the same proportion of the total population as the number of households without a car is of total households - so 60,000,000/5 or roughly twelve million. Carlessness doesn't seem to be a matter for suicide, or the population would be rather lower.

    (My father lived in a village and had no access to a car for five years this century...)

    On the matter of general dispositions, not in reply to fairy hedgehog, which come to that neither was most of the bit above but I caught onto the quoted bit from someone else's post:

    I can see that Ed feels a need to have a "safe" target for his miserable anger and fear, one which won't be disputed at least by Emma. He has chosen to use Will as the person who is somehow to be blamed for all their woes, which (since Will has nothing whatever to do with causing those woes) is not reasonable, but is better than his blaming Emma, who does have a part in causing them. Having a rant about the Evil Will who must not be allowed "one more minute" with Will's son than Ed was prepared to acquiesce about six years ago is not going to do Ed's situation the least good, but is a vent for Ed's malaise in his awareness of his incapacities. I am not sure that I see it as any less ugly than a man in fear of penury verbally attacking immigrants and using racist language about them, though. The harm done to the abuser by the objects of the abuse seems to me to be about the same.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Scarlett the Harlot (U14942477) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I agree Shirley

    I thought Susan and Emma's acting was outstanding.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Jane in Egypt (U14410788) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Well done to the actors of Susan, Emma and Ed, but for goodness sakes can we now have some reality and some benefits. 

    Well said!! 
    I second that

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Auntie Molly (U14110968) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I agree with the posters saying that a car isn't an essential for Ed and Em. Ed could as has been said order what he needs for the cows on line or even over the phone. Or why not a moped? Didn't Darrell buy one for his daughter?

    Re car ownership in general - how many households have two or more cars when with a bit of organisation and imagination as has been said they could manage perfectly well with one? We do. People often express surprise that OH and I only have one car between us even though both of us are able to drive.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by fairy hedgehog (U1485678) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    > they could manage perfectly well with one? <

    We could manage very well with one car, but we have two. The one time when my OH crashed his and borrowed mine for the eight weeks it took for the broken part to be delivered, I only missed my car twice.

    One of the times, I had to get an animal taxi to get my dog to a vet because my OH was too late in starting his home journey to allow me to get to our appointment in time.

    Having my car is an expensive luxury, but we can easily afford it

    fh

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by NewEssexWoman (U9776561) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Having my car is an expensive luxury, but we can easily afford it
     


    And at least you're honest about it. We have choosen for the past 20 plus years to have only one car although we could easily have afforded two. And that car is scarcely used - a shopping trip once a month, going out into the country for walks, a few longer journeys (mainly me visisting my mother and then oh is left without a car for the week) and a few other bits and bats. We both do short journeys on foot or by push bike.

    We don't live in a village but nor do we live in a city. Public transport is rubbish.

    If we were hard up the car would be one of the first things to go.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by rusticreg (U15456956) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    "Granted there are a few holes in the SL"

    A few ! ! !

    The whole nonsense is is barely strung together, there are so many glaring ommissions and ludicrous situations.

    Unfortunately I doubt very much this is a story prImarily about rural poverty, the recession etc but one of Emma's 'mistaken' choices.

    This sub Dickensian twaddle is therefore no more than a means of over egging THAT plot line - hence the scant research into this subject and the absurd events describing their financial position.

    If this was to be a story relating to people suffering financially, there would at least be some comment on the plans to abolish the Agricultural Wages Board. Maybe not directly related to Ed, but certainly relevent to what the Archers was originally intended to be.

    Sadly, this farcical plot is yet another twist on credibility where characters are changed to fit story lines and events take place that bear little resemblance to the real world.

    Ultimately those responsible for writing the Archers can do as they see fit, but let's not kid ourselves this anything about rural poverty.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Turkey Baster (U14562428) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I want to have a grump - I've never had a car, and gave up on driving lessons because it was too expensive. I live in London, and loads of people say "oh you don't need a car in London!"
    Maybe not, but public transport is a complete pain, and doesn't take you to your door (mine is up a hill) with your bits and pieces of shopping, laptop, work bag etc. It's also limiting socially and recreationally if you want to get to somewhere that involves planning an overground journey, a bus and a tube (like the journey I do to visit family once a month). It can be an endurance test getting from A to B with a young child and a child in a pushchair - believe me, I did it for years! The main problem is having to carry everything with you, there's no popping a jacket or a pair of wellies in the boot just in case you need them. A single parent friend in a Cornish village did indeed prioritise the car over her own - not the childrens' - food, and I could understand why.
    I gave up on cycling eventually - lost my nerve, also got fed up arriving at work meetings and social dates bright pink and soaked/sweaty/cold etc.
    My other gripe is seasonal - we can't just travel to visit someone on Christmas Day. It has to be Christmas Eve until at least Boxing Day depending on the transport used.
    Grump over - feel a bit better now!

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Scarlett the Harlot (U14942477) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I know exactly what you are saying Turkey Baster. We had a couple of old bangers for a while but neither would pass an MOT when it was due so it cost us a shedload. We haven't been able to afford a car since. Living in London you do have public transport but it isn't cheap and sometimes we long to take a run out to the coast or the countryside just to have a walk and a pub lunch.

    We don't need a car really but it would be nice to have one.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by EBGB (U2613853) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I would prefer not to drive. But I work outdoors, for various different people, virtually none of whom are accessible by bus, and most of whom are not really within a safe cycle journey (especially in the dark), and so I need a car.

    This morning I had to drop it off, 4 miles away, for essential repairs. To get back, I had to walk 10 mins to the bus stop, and then - because it's only an hourly service - kill another 40-odd mins before the bus arrived. That's non-city bus services for you, and we're not too badly served around here.

    Yes, Ed could probably manage without a car; farm supplies are probably delivered, after all. Emma could probably manage without a car if she got other people to run her children around, but the obvious person is Nic, who's already basically got a car-full with 3 children, so couldn't fit in Emma's two. All the grandparents are already holding down multiple jobs (nice touch by Susan to point this out to Emma as regards income), so couldn't realistically help that much.

    Without a car, neither Ed nor Em can realistically look at getting any jobs that are further away than a walk / cycle ride. Not having a car costs *massive* amounts of time, which doesn't fit in well with small children's schedules, or so they tell me, which would restrict their options further.

    So yes, in reality they need a car.

    The stupidity lies in _taking_out_a_loan_ for one, rather than asking someone else for a private loan, or even trying to borrow a car temporarily.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by bebopalula (U8847542) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    Exactly rusticreg; top post

    Bebop

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    < The stupidity lies in _taking_out_a_loan_ for one, rather than asking someone else for a private loan, or even trying to borrow a car temporarily. >

    Agreed and either Niel and Susan or Oliver would have lent them it.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Lady Trudie Tilney Glorfindel Maldini (U2222312) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    But that would have involved admitting the state of their finances, something they have only just begun to do.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Earldunda (U14196337) on Thursday, 15th November 2012

    I agree there have been holes -nay, craters - in this storyline, but agree the acting has been great.

    That bit last night when Susan came to the food bank and realised Emma was there was heartrending - I was actually holding my breath (and as I was driving, this could have been a silly move!) It made me think how I would feel if I had found one of my daughters in there.

    Well done to the actors of Susan, Emma and Ed, but for goodness sakes can we now have some reality and some benefits. 
    Yes it was a good moment.

    I even thought Susan might pretend she didn't know Emma!

    Let them eat lentils!

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Yollop (U15533059) on Sunday, 9th December 2012

    well said. I would have thought that the Farmers' Union chairman would have something to say.

    Report message37

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