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White smoke from the exhaust

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Messages: 1 - 23 of 23
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Fourteenbore (U2227836) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Well, It's probably a blown head gasket or, as once happened to me, the seals in the brake servo have gone and the engine has drunk all the brake fluid. Neither necessarily terminal for the vehicle. In my case I simply ordered some new seals and rebuilt the servo, not difficult. Admittedly modern head gaskets can be more of a job, but farmers generally are used to dealing with mechanical devices. Even an engine from a breaker's yard shouldn't set them back as much as a new car. Come on Ed, show a bit of gumption.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Sister Gnome of Wibbling Plume DefiantUntoThingy (U14268086) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Have we been told what model/make car it is/was? Rural mates with a bit of know-how/ebay/breaker's yard/borrow yer ramps, mate, and lifting tackle, etc, few pheasants and cider in payment, and bob's yer storyline - sorted for under a hundred. Or is that unrealistic?

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by wynkyn de worde (U14928439) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Datsubishy Goosegog GT

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by The Leech Pedlar (U15129703) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    That's it in one.
    A blown CH gasket is relatively minor and it's one of those jobs where the older the vehicle is, the easier it is to replace... You don't have to spend half a day removing engine management, fuel injection and assorted guff, before you can even see the engine.

    A competent DIY mechanic - as I'm sure Eddie will have become over the years (and if he hasn't I'm sure he'll know someone who has) - should be able to fix it in a weekend.and still have time for a drink down The Bull.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by RichTeabiscuit (U2000482) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Well, Eddie appears to have told Wiwyum that the engine is a quote-unquote "royt arf". So presumably it's not a head gasket. Either that or Eddie is no mechanic.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by The Leech Pedlar (U15129703) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Wednesday evening, Eddie told Joe that 'Fat Paul' said it was just the head gasket that had gone.
    That's not major. Replace that, change the oil and give the car a good service.

    William's claims to Nic, of it being a "rust-bucket" sound like the typical hyperbole of the William character.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Sister Gnome of Wibbling Plume DefiantUntoThingy (U14268086) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Zackly. Head gasket is a good excuse to get into someone's shed/ yard, and have a good, long dirty weekend of it, including block and tackle and lots of jawing.

    It's. What. People. Do. In. The. Country. When. Not. Well. Off. And. With. Old. Cars.

    Well, I remember those days well.


    [misty-eyed look] My first head gasket was a Triumph Tiger Cub, and it was great to see the orange good oozing out as I pulled hard on its nuts... it had blown when I tried to overtake a John Deere tractor, and shocked both of us. Sigh.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Dailyfix (U14602649) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Absolutely my nephew lives on a farm they have no money he fixes up cars from scrap in an outhouse then sells them cheap to friends. He is teaching himself mechanics and earning a little cash, but it requires gumption and initiative so no chance of that with Ed.

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by BalDaddy (U14990270) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Absolutely my nephew lives on a farm they have no money he fixes up cars from scrap in an outhouse then sells them cheap to friends. He is teaching himself mechanics and earning a little cash, but it requires gumption and initiative so no chance of that with Ed.  Not always so easy. Certain vehicles of the vintage they can probably afford create big problems if the head gasket goes; warped head, damaged face of the block, coolant in the cylinders can cause partial seizure, bu**ered cat if they had one.
    Also on some French models, very difficult to get at. I'm not a mechanic btw, just based on mine and others experiences

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Sister Gnome of Wibbling Plume DefiantUntoThingy (U14268086) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Funnily enough, I was also thinking, '... as long as it's not French.'

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by aquaticDougal (U3480367) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    Agreed.
    If the break is a simple one, with maybe just water in a cylinder? (Which the steam may indicate.)
    It may be cheaply repairable, with just a replacement gasket.
    But
    If more complicated & water in oil & both in cylinders ..... then it's not only the gasket that needs replacing but maybe also the head? hoses? heater matrix? & all the associated flushing that is needed.
    Big job.

    & if the car was run to a standstill with no water ..... (which the burning smell may suggest? & Temp gauge would have hinted all not well!)
    Forget it
    New engine, which will far outweigh the value of the car or the fact that afterwards, all you are left with is a still valueless old car that just happens to have an expensive new engine fitted. It's worth no more.
    Good money after bad.
    & they have neither!

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Graham 42 (U6041479) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    i think it's cruel to use seals like that.

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Borrowed Time (U14261253) on Friday, 2nd November 2012

    White smoke?

    What gives Emma the right to decide on a new pope?

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by The Leech Pedlar (U15129703) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    Well I think it's funny, BT. :- )

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Imperfectly37 (U4335981) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    The head gasket on my Renault 5 went driving back from the pub up a very steep hill when I was at university (so a few years ago!). Rang my Dad for advice. Next morning drained the oil and at the end of term Dad came with a trailer to take the car home. I took the cylinder head off - Haynes manuals are wonderful things, and took it to a local engineering company to get it skimmed. Then I put it back together. It was a rust bucket of a car though and only lasted another 12 months before being consigned to the scrap heap.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by march51 (U14448837) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    Hah! Misty eyed indeed! I started with a Cub too and went on to ride many of its big brothers (still got a Bonnie somewhere) but of all of them the Cub's head was the trickiest because the angled engine. But as you say, bags of Hermatite helped stick it down.
    Anyway, back on subject: has anyone mentioned the ever more stringent MoT reqiurements, or are they not applicable in Ambridgeland. From the sound of it this motor would have failed miserably.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    Snork BT! Will obviously thinks he is a candidate for sainthood.

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    New engine, which will far outweigh the value of the car or the fact that afterwards, all you are left with is a still valueless old car that just happens to have an expensive new engine fitted. It's worth no more.
    Good money after bad.  

    Exactly the situation that I've just had with my old Shogun, where the head gasket blew for the second time in 6 months, but the chassis, brake pipes etc weren't in a good enough state to warrant putting another engine in.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Fourteenbore (U2227836) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    New engine, which will far outweigh the value of the car or the fact that afterwards, all you are left with is a still valueless old car that just happens to have an expensive new engine fitted. It's worth no more.
    Good money after bad.  

    Exactly the situation that I've just had with my old Shogun, where the head gasket blew for the second time in 6 months, but the chassis, brake pipes etc weren't in a good enough state to warrant putting another engine in.  

    But a lot depends on your financial situation. Present car with duff engine valueless, New or used car in better condition than the one you have before the gasket blew is going to cost ££££££. Repair engine or replace with one from breaker's yard, probably less, and you still have a useable vehicle of which you know the condition better than buying a cheapo.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    White smoke from the exhaust 

    New Vicar of Ambridge ?

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by carrick-bend (U2288869) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    I see your point, Fourteenbore, but in the example I gave I had my rustbucket put it up onto a lift and looked at to see if it was worth putting a new engine in - without a new engine it would have failed the MOT on emissions, but even with a different engine, the chassis and brake pipes were rotted, and the brake disc was shot, etc, so in this particular case it wouldn't have been worth it unless someone gave me a different engine to keep it going until it failed its MOT in Spring.

    I fully agree about a "known quantity", though.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by elizabeth church (U14285872) on Saturday, 3rd November 2012

    In Birmingham there is a scheme for young people, one of the things they do is pick up cars which are about to be scraped and fix them up. Once they are road worthy again they are sold cheaply. Ambridge isn't far from Birmingham
    Would they buy something like that ? Yes they would but in fact they will take on a loan and buy something they can't afford.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by RAFromSw (U14574822) on Sunday, 4th November 2012

    That's it in one.
    A blown CH gasket is relatively minor and it's one of those jobs where the older the vehicle is, the easier it is to replace... You don't have to spend half a day removing engine management, fuel injection and assorted guff, before you can even see the engine.

    A competent DIY mechanic - as I'm sure Eddie will have become over the years (and if he hasn't I'm sure he'll know someone who has) - should be able to fix it in a weekend.and still have time for a drink down The Bull. 


    Really?

    Having had one of the famous freelancers with CH gasket failures, which happened to me twice, Landrover main dealer quoted over 2000, eventually had it done by a back street garage which specialised in LR for 900, that wasn't trivial in my view.

    Report message23

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