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My Mum always managed to ...

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Messages: 51 - 100 of 218
  • Message 51

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Tagging on: by the sound of it,Emma is feeding them the *same* cheap food day after day, which is a mistake. "We've had an awful lot of bean and vegetable casseroles lately" does sound that way, to me.

    As for "do you know how long that took to cook?" well, yes, Emma, I do. About ten minutes of your time, twenty if you dawdled; the rest was slow cooking and you didn't have to do a thing. I suppose the beans might have been kidney beans and needed boiling first, five minutes during which you could be getting on with cutting up the veg. Other beans need soaking overnight, which takes none of your time at all.

    Report message1

  • Message 52

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by A Frend (U2249422) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I expect Eddie's cash in hand approach and regular lying to the Revenue means that there is more disposable income in the senior Grundy household.

    Clarrie used to send Eddie out to poach when she wanted meat for the pot. I suppose Em could take a leaf out of her MiL's book and send Ed out too but that really would get up Will's nose. Besides which he might lose his own livelihood since that benevolent employer Brine will be happy to boot Will out of his job if he fails to protect enough birds.

    I have been warming to Ed recently but not any more.

    Report message2

  • Message 53

    , in reply to message 52.

    Posted by Rose Sal Volatile Parade (U4705648) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I agree with Emma.

    Ed was bang out of order moaning about her food in front of the muxed ip pawn-child, Georgie. If he wanted something tastier, he should have eaten up, shut up, told Georgie not to be rude, thought about it and offered some solution when he'd come up with one.

    I can't understand why Emma is being attacked as a poor cook for doing bean stews and soups. How many bean stews and soups does Ruth know how to cook? Her lack of variety might be a problem in the last few meals but that's hardly evidence that she can't cook. In my book, anyone who can cook a bean stew (whatever that is) can cook. They don't come as ready meals, do they?

    Report message3

  • Message 54

    , in reply to message 51.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Tagging on: by the sound of it,Emma is feeding them the *same* cheap food day after day, which is a mistake. "We've had an awful lot of bean and vegetable casseroles lately" does sound that way, to me. 

    Does ANYONE (other than vegetarians) even know what a "bean and vegetable casserole" IS?

    The whole point of stews is - or at least can be - to spread a little meat a long way. A few cheap sausages would make all the difference. Or a tin of corned beef.

    Report message4

  • Message 55

    , in reply to message 54.

    Posted by Sister Gnome of Wibbling Plume DefiantUntoThingy (U14268086) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Ed and Emmurgh are so different personalities (using the word loosely, duh).

    Emmurgh has a pinch of pettiness, pound of envy, half a pint of bile and a dollop of bitterness in hers, while Ed seems a more optimistic sort, more big picture, glass half-full and inclined to apparent dismissiveness/thoughtlessness with his flip comments - less worried about being broke than she, perhaps, and apparently insensitive to her inner monologue and wrestling match in her head of trying to make the money go round. Perhaps they need to talk a bit more about it...

    Her handing over the tin-opener in a spontaneous ceremony over a cold and empty plate would give us all an interesting episode in family dynamics, especially if Will drops off something tasty for his son at the very same moment.

    I'm surprised Ed isn't coming up with money-raising solutions, legal or otherwise. He doesn't seem to have the cash-is-fine attitude of his ne'er-do-well male lineage.

    It doesn't quite add up, but then nor do their budgets.

    It does make a heap of beans, though. 'No, George, put that matchbox DOWN, NOW!' followed by a boom would good radio make.

    Report message5

  • Message 56

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by wildwomanwonga (U14597111) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    That old standby in scriptwriting handbook.

    Unbelievable. 
    Hey folks, this is not real, it's a soap.................... 
    ha - another one for the pot!

    And if we were discussing 'A Christmas Carol' for example? It's just a book - it's not real.

    I do wonder why anyone bothers to sign up to the Archers MB and then be frankly amazed that the subjects on discussion are about The Archers and feel that it needs to be pointed out that it's a fictional series.

    Bit hard to blindly find that you have signed up for DTA without the slightest intention of doing so.

    Plus the subjects on discussion are pretty real even if the context in which they occur is a made up one.

    Report message6

  • Message 57

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Lakey_Hill (U14391672) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    The other problem is the electricity/gas bills. If Emma has to use the oven to create these meals, that is going to be quite a lot more expensive than a ring or two on top of the stove.

    Report message7

  • Message 58

    , in reply to message 57.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Lakey how much do you think it costs to use an oven?

    a) In summer

    b) In winter (September-July these days!)

    Report message8

  • Message 59

    , in reply to message 58.

    Posted by Lakey_Hill (U14391672) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    If you roast a joint for a couple of hours in an electric oven, quite a lot if you are so desperate that you need advances on your wages.

    Report message9

  • Message 60

    , in reply to message 59.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Someone should give her a remoska. I understand those are cheaper to run. She could cook roasts of meat in it as well as stews.

    Report message10

  • Message 61

    , in reply to message 59.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    But you can cook several dishes at once eg cook pudding or another dinner alongside the roast/casserole.

    Report message11

  • Message 62

    , in reply to message 58.

    Posted by A Frend (U2249422) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I don't know the answer to these but would like to. Sinewey meat will need a long slow cook and will that use up quite a bit of electricity in the oven? Does it depend on the temp eg a pizza at 250 for ten minutes will cost more/less than a stew at 130 for 3 hours.

    Report message12

  • Message 63

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Alyson6 (U14274714) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    "It is outrageous that poor people irresponsibly have babies."



    Of course it is. It has to be the cause of many (if not most) of the world's problems. And it is irresponsible and it is unfair to the child/ren. It seems that nowadays many so-called adults drift from one partner to another like teenagers which would be fine providing they didnt feel the need to seal each short lived affair with a child. Many are no doubt apeing the 'celebrities' they see in the media. The difference being that said celebrities can afford to support a string of children with different partners. Not that this prevents said offspring suffering emotional and psychological problems as a consequence of their selfish 'adult' parents.

    Report message13

  • Message 64

    , in reply to message 62.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I don't know the answer to these but would like to. Sinewey meat will need a long slow cook and will that use up quite a bit of electricity in the oven? 

    Not much - tens of pence at most.

    Does it depend on the temp eg a pizza at 250 for ten minutes will cost more/less than a stew at 130 for 3 hours. 

    Yes - but not to that extent. You use a lot for heating up; less to keep warm as they are well insulated. Pizza for 10 mins @250 will then take a long time to cool down below 130.

    A typical cooker is 2-3kw so will cost maybe 40p/hour whilst warming. Much less when the light goesout.

    Of course in winter the heat also heats the house, so you can offset heating costs.

    Report message14

  • Message 65

    , in reply to message 64.

    Posted by Lakey_Hill (U14391672) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Well, if they do offset the ehating and cooking.

    How much does using a ring to heat up the beans cost? Less, I would have thought.

    Report message15

  • Message 66

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Listener1969 (U14683000) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I would have tipped the bean stew over his head!  I think Ed has a very good point. She should take some advice from his mother. It's Emma who needs the pot emptying over her head, in my opinion. Well dome, Ed!

    Report message16

  • Message 67

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by barwick_green (U2668006) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    "My Mum always managed to ..."

    ....cook the rabbit / or pheasant my dad had poached from under the nose of Fatman Forrest.'

    Have the SWs forgotten how the Grundy family used to supplement thr larder?

    Report message17

  • Message 68

    , in reply to message 67.

    Posted by charmingAnnielynn (U11952070) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    What about a crock pot for cooking? They're also called slow cookers, I don't know if there's a British term different from the US ones - the countertop, plug-in thingies where you drop your meat/veg/packet of onion soup mix in, put the lid on, and 7 or 8 hours later the meal is done. IIRC, those use a minimal amount of electricity, and almost everyone has one kicking around in the basement/attic, if they don't actually use it regularly. Or they're on sale at every boot sale or thrift shop. Clarrie probably has two - I know I've got both large and smaller versions, depending on what I'm cooking.

    Report message18

  • Message 69

    , in reply to message 54.

    Posted by Lilians twin (U4487710) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Tagging on: by the sound of it,Emma is feeding them the *same* cheap food day after day, which is a mistake. "We've had an awful lot of bean and vegetable casseroles lately" does sound that way, to me.

    Does ANYONE (other than vegetarians) even know what a "bean and vegetable casserole" IS?

    The whole point of stews is - or at least can be - to spread a little meat a long way. A few cheap sausages would make all the difference. Or a tin of corned beef. 


    Ummm - yes OI. Not a vegetarian but frequently have meat-free meals. Bean & veg casserole - various tinned beans - cannelini, butter, flageolet (or soak and cook a large quantitiy - they freeze well) casseroled with as many root veg as you can think of plus delicious curried dumplings on top.

    Lils xxxx

    Report message19

  • Message 70

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by BlackSheepBoy (U11150138) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    At the very best Ed was tactless in saying that, and testing the patience of his partner who he knows very well is in difficulty managing within the budget mainly supplied by him.

    To want a "better" meal, laugh as if it were a joke, and then say he ate better at home; well it must not have sounded very encouraging to her.

    When money is short, you have to adapt and try new cheaper ways. His role is to adapt himself to liking more bean stew and bothering less about meat.

    My only complaint about Emma in this context is that, instead of humiliating herself repeatedly in front of Ruth (and indirectly to David and Pip no doubt), she might more helpfully plead some help from either of their parents. It isn't what she would want, but there is a time to allow for family to be as supportive as I think they would be. It isn't as if they are poor because they have been profligate.

    Report message20

  • Message 71

    , in reply to message 66.

    Posted by Scarlett the Harlot (U14942477) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Emma should go to Susan for advice not Clarrie.

    Report message21

  • Message 72

    , in reply to message 68.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    In reply to charmingAnnielynn:

    What about a crock pot for cooking? They're also called slow cookers, I don't know if there's a British term different from the US ones - the countertop, plug-in thingies where you drop your meat/veg/packet of onion soup mix in, put the lid on, and 7 or 8 hours later the meal is done. IIRC, those use a minimal amount of electricity, and almost everyone has one kicking around in the basement/attic, if they don't actually use it regularly. Or they're on sale at every boot sale or thrift shop. Clarrie probably has two - I know I've got both large and smaller versions, depending on what I'm cooking. 


    "Slow cookers" in UK. Mine is rated 210W so 8hours @210W=1680Wh @13p/kWh is about 20p
    Bit less as you probably have it on Low at least part of the time. Saty 15p


    Heating beans on hob? Hobs max 1.8kW normally so if 10 mins = 300Wh - about 4p. Though I doubt it takes that long.

    Put simply, cooking uses little energy - even ovens as they are insulated.

    Which, oddly, supposedly energy efficient slow cookers are not. Insulated and thermostatically controlled they would use far less power!

    Report message22

  • Message 73

    , in reply to message 71.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Agreed. Clarrie would blab to Nic.

    Report message23

  • Message 74

    , in reply to message 73.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Clarrie has no reason to like Emma, and when Clarrie was in trouble Emma ignored her.

    Better go to someone who doesn't think not-a-lot of you, Emma.

    Report message24

  • Message 75

    , in reply to message 70.

    Posted by Dailyfix (U14602649) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I agree with your post although not profligate the decision to have a child they couldn't afford is a big factor in their current circumstances a big extra cost and a reduction in Emma's earnings at a time of economic recession was an irresponsible thing to do IMO.
    Emma should ask her Mum for advice that is what mothers are for. I'm sure she & Neil could help too. What about out of date stuff from the village shop? Emma could also advertise for cleaning / babysitting work.
    As for Ed he really has a cheek. If he was a better provider the situation would not arise and to disrespect her in front of the kids is unforgivable she should have told him to p**s off to his mother's for dinner or to stop being such a loser and get a second job to support his family.

    Report message25

  • Message 76

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by virtual_jan (U13662056) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    On reflection, it might have been gravy; I bet CG knows! 


    yes it was "at least her gravy moved"

    v_j (not CG)

    Report message26

  • Message 77

    , in reply to message 76.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Thanks, Bubba-Blenkinsop and v_j.

    I didn't have the faintest idea which it was....

    Report message27

  • Message 78

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by cowpatty (U14650862) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I would have tipped the bean stew over his head!  Okay so it's bean stew...what is it now??

    Report message28

  • Message 79

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Turkey Baster (U14562428) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Don't his parents have a freezer full of delicious sanglier?

    Pork shoulder/gammon is dirt cheap these days.

    Or a few sausages in the stew?

    A man needs meat.

    Or bring on a male calf for veal?  
    ... or get another guinea pig and start guinea pig farming. It's very easy. Guinea pigs breed like... guinea pigs. But they can't eat Li'l Mitch now that they've given him a name.
    By the way, I've brought kids up on next to nothing and the one thing you don't run low on is bread. Don't the SWs know about poverty??

    Report message29

  • Message 80

    , in reply to message 79.

    Posted by Lilians twin (U4487710) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Exactly Turkey B. My 4 could demolish a large loaf (with their own choice of pnut butt, marmite, honey, jam*) plus plate of home made jam tarts just walking through the kitchen. Wash it down with a litre of milke. And still polish off a full meat & 2 veg plus apple crumble/rice pud or whatever meal a mere hour later.

    *They did the buttering, jamming etc themselves. There are limits to the devoted mother bit.

    Lils xxx

    Report message30

  • Message 81

    , in reply to message 79.

    Posted by virtual_jan (U13662056) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Emma missed a trick with Ed's sandwiches today - she could have mashed up some of those left over beans from yesterday's stew and made a nice bean pate for him. Saving the fish paste for tomorrow!

    This suggestion brought to you from virtual_jan's book of household management.


    v_j

    Report message31

  • Message 82

    , in reply to message 81.

    Posted by Jane in Egypt (U14508770) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    Emma missed a trick with Ed's sandwiches today - she could have mashed up some of those left over beans from yesterday's stew and made a nice bean pate for him. Saving the fish paste for tomorrow!

    This suggestion brought to you from virtual_jan's book of household management.


    v_j  
    A working man like Ed needs a lot of calories, they have milk so why not make porridge instead of fish paste sandwiches.

    Bean casserole, great but make sure it has meat fat in it, the beans absorb the fat and taste fantastic. Buy dog bones, I still do, the marrow on a big thigh bones is gorgeous. a bit of curry powder and a different taste again, cheap sausages and tomato puree and another taste again, chilli powder and another taste again. I do a lovely casserole with haricot beans, tomato puree and friend onions.

    Loads and loads of milk puddings, tapioca, macaroni, rice, a little ice cream sauce or jam and George would woof it down.

    Milk shakes with fresh fruit like apples. They have apples and milk just add sugar. Add some porridge oats to bulk it out

    As for lunch a huge bowl of pasta with a tiny bit of sauce, different sauce every day.

    I still cook like this, I am living in Egypt and with tourism down I haven't eaten anything but mega cheap for two years. So Emma annoys me, you can do it if you have too.

    As for my slo-cooker it is always on the go

    Report message32

  • Message 83

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by JoinedPeetsBoard_Smeesues_too (U14519481) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    I think the menfolk are just fussy eaters - nothing but a Roast will do on a Sunday ..

    Whereas Chris is more tolerant .. or just hungrier ..

    And so called "veggie" meals don't always taste as good as they look - I know - I've tried a few ..
    JPBS

    Report message33

  • Message 84

    , in reply to message 82.

    Posted by JoinedPeetsBoard_Smeesues_too (U14519481) on Monday, 1st October 2012

    A working man like Ed needs a lot of calories, they have milk so why not make porridge instead of fish paste sandwiches.  But you can't take porridge as a "packed lunch.."!
    JPBS

    Report message34

  • Message 85

    , in reply to message 84.

    Posted by PhyllisDoris (U2224329) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    But you can't take porridge as a "packed lunch.."! 

    Yes you can! It's an old Scottish tradition:

    www.scotsman.com/new...

    Report message35

  • Message 86

    , in reply to message 82.

    Posted by wynkyn de worde (U14928439) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012


    Spot on.

    When I'm next in Egypt can I invite myself over Jane?

    I use soy sauce, worcester sauce and home grown chillies (v-easy in a pot) to add to the spectrum.

    I would add that our little farmshop butcher gives away these bones - just ask - kidneys too. Off cuts and trims are pence if he would even charge makes great potted meat/stews.

    Country living. What is the matter with the SWs?

    Report message36

  • Message 87

    , in reply to message 86.

    Posted by mistynetty (U15299324) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    our butcher at xmas has taken to removing the bags of giblets from the free range turkeys and geese as most people don't know what to do with them. I ended up taking a carrier bag full of them both for us and our dog.
    Got some great stock for soups from them. liver is very economical & tasty especially cooked with onions and orange juice.

    At our allotment we do a big veg swop,- perhaps Ed and Emma could swap some of their milk for some nice veggies.

    Report message37

  • Message 88

    , in reply to message 87.

    Posted by DracoM1 (U14252039) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    What I don't fully understand is that Susan hasn't realised.

    This is a very small farming village, she would know that dairy is in trouble, she would know that with Georgie and Kiera are growing fast and thus more demanding, that Ed's income from milk is dropping, she would know that Mike's round had been losing customers.

    So why does she not ask her daughter how she's coping, and no matter what Emma actually said, WATCH what she bought in the shop and realise.

    Susan has been poor and strapped for cash. She would recognise the signs. Mother / daughter / grandchildren nexus? Ditto Clarrie? Hasn't noticed Emma's probs having been poor for her whole life?

    Women close ranks in the face of adversity, particularly the women of a close knit community, and the total isolation of Emma with two parent figures round her both properly acquainted with grief yet doing / saying nothing seems totally illogical to me.

    Report message38

  • Message 89

    , in reply to message 86.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    1) Emma is a good cook.

    2) Eddie could drop off a rabbit or two regularly. Pheasants too of course. It's baffling that he doesn't already. Of course he would.

    3) They have milk galore of a good quality. They could even make clotted cream.

    4) Brookfield has meat and vegetables and should give them a weekly box, whatever Emma's income. It's the sort of thing people do. In the country it ensures good will and neigbourliness and you never know when you might need a good deed from your neighbours.

    I just get fed up with the encapsulating of SLs. Oh, we need and issue. We'll do something on rural poverty. But as things stand, in Ed and Em's situation there should be little need to go to the supermarket for much of their food.

    Report message39

  • Message 90

    , in reply to message 87.

    Posted by wynkyn de worde (U14928439) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    Lucy you!

    As you say they contain the livers. chic/turk liver Pâté, fried livers on toast free!!

    Luck you!

    As for the veg. What do BF do with the limp/damaged stuff?

    Then the seasonal fruit Isn't dad in charge of that orchard?

    Report message40

  • Message 91

    , in reply to message 85.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    I was at school with someone who (in the sixth form with small studies) used to pour salted porridge into the (grease-proof paper lined) top drawer of the desk, and cut slices off to eat while doing prep.

    Report message41

  • Message 92

    , in reply to message 89.

    Posted by Mysterious (U14144861) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    1) Emma is a good cook.

    2) Eddie could drop off a rabbit or two regularly. Pheasants too of course. It's baffling that he doesn't already. Of course he would.

    3) They have milk galore of a good quality. They could even make clotted cream.

    4) Brookfield has meat and vegetables and should give them a weekly box, whatever Emma's income. It's the sort of thing people do. In the country it ensures good will and neigbourliness and you never know when you might need a good deed from your neighbours.

    I just get fed up with the encapsulating of SLs. Oh, we need and issue. We'll do something on rural poverty. But as things stand, in Ed and Em's situation there should be little need to go to the supermarket for much of their food.  
    Excellent post this, and wholeheartedly agree. Emma could really turn her role of downtrodden misery around and get her brain into gear. She has so much going for her but sady doesn't realise it.

    Report message42

  • Message 93

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by ANDROMEDAKRAKEN (U14391535) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    And who is Claire?

    Clare is in the community

    Clare is a social worker with all the right jargon who likes to sort out other people's problems while ignoring her own. She is white, middle class and heterosexual - but doesn't like to be reminded of it. She is a control freak but both her personal and professional lives are out of control.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Funnier by far than most R4 comedy

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra... 


    Oh, silly me, I thought we were discussing The Archers.

    Report message43

  • Message 94

    , in reply to message 93.

    Posted by ANDROMEDAKRAKEN (U14391535) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    And who is Claire?

    Clare is in the community

    Clare is a social worker with all the right jargon who likes to sort out other people's problems while ignoring her own. She is white, middle class and heterosexual - but doesn't like to be reminded of it. She is a control freak but both her personal and professional lives are out of control.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Funnier by far than most R4 comedy

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra... 


    Oh, silly me, I thought we were discussing The Archers.  
    Well, Jane in Egypt was, who my actual reply was to, so I dunno why you are waffling on about second rate "comedy shows", Organowafflebot.

    Report message44

  • Message 95

    , in reply to message 94.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    In reply to ANDROMEDAKRAKEN:

    And who is Claire?

    Clare is in the community

    Clare is a social worker with all the right jargon who likes to sort out other people's problems while ignoring her own. She is white, middle class and heterosexual - but doesn't like to be reminded of it. She is a control freak but both her personal and professional lives are out of control.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Funnier by far than most R4 comedy

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Oh, silly me, I thought we were discussing The Archers. Well, Jane in Egypt was, who my actual reply was to, so I dunno why you are waffling on about second rate "comedy shows", Organowafflebot. 


    YOU asked in post 28 << And who is Claire? >>

    I was polite enough to take the time to give you a detailed reply.

    YOU ARE AS RUDE AS YOU ARE SHOUTY

    Report message45

  • Message 96

    , in reply to message 95.

    Posted by Rose Sal Volatile Parade (U4705648) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    I always think Claire in the Community and The Archers have quite a lot in common, OI. I had to be convinced that Claire and Helen weren't the same actress playing exactly the same kind of character.

    I think CintheC is one of funniest and best written comedies on R4.

    Report message46

  • Message 97

    , in reply to message 93.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    ANDROMEDAKRAKEN, my guess is that Claire was a typo for Clarrie.

    Fa-Fa Aweigh, quite a way back at 43, Kamikaze Pot Roast: I have visions of "Stop the Pigeon".  There is a lovely poem written in the fourteenth century about the Land of Cockaygne, in which
    The geese when roasted on the spit
    Fly to the abbey (believe it or not)
    And cry out 'Geese, all hot, all hot!'

    It also has in it monks who fly using their sleeves as wings, and glass in the church which becomes absolutely clear when you need to read the bible and then goes dim again when you have finished, and other wishful thinkings of a monastic life. There's a nice translation at www.southampton.ac.u...

    Report message47

  • Message 98

    , in reply to message 95.

    Posted by ANDROMEDAKRAKEN (U14391535) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    In reply to ANDROMEDAKRAKEN:

    And who is Claire?

    Clare is in the community

    Clare is a social worker with all the right jargon who likes to sort out other people's problems while ignoring her own. She is white, middle class and heterosexual - but doesn't like to be reminded of it. She is a control freak but both her personal and professional lives are out of control.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Funnier by far than most R4 comedy

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Oh, silly me, I thought we were discussing The Archers. Well, Jane in Egypt was, who my actual reply was to, so I dunno why you are waffling on about second rate "comedy shows", Organowafflebot. 


    YOU asked in post 28 << And who is Claire? >>

    I was polite enough to take the time to give you a detailed reply.

    YOU ARE AS RUDE AS YOU ARE SHOUTY  
    But your reply was clearly incorrect once again.

    I couldn't give a toss if you think me rude, I find you quite impertinent rather a lot of the time.

    Thank you Chris G, I see that now.

    Report message48

  • Message 99

    , in reply to message 88.

    Posted by JoinedPeetsBoard_Smeesues_too (U14519481) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    Susan did buy some shoes for Keira ..

    Their present trouble is because of the extra unplanned expenditure of George's karate lessons.

    And of course no matter how they'd paid it it still *IS* extra ..
    JPBS

    Report message49

  • Message 100

    , in reply to message 87.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Tuesday, 2nd October 2012

    < At our allotment we do a big veg swop,- perhaps Ed and Emma could swap some of their milk for some nice veggies. >

    We do swaps and we also give away surplus veg to friends and neighbours. I am sure Bert would be plying them with runner beans and other goodies at the moment.

    Report message50

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