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Chris Carter

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Messages: 1 - 33 of 33
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by venice (U14304162) on Monday, 27th August 2012

    I clearly recal that Chris was born with a cleft palate which meant hysterical Susan found it difficult to bond with hin but this is never mentioned and he speaks much better than the rest of his family. Has he necer been teased or bullied for this disability?

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Monday, 27th August 2012

    The condition was corrected with an operation when he was a few months old. By the time he was at school he will have had a scar that was probably not particularly noticable.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by afficionada (U14738262) on Monday, 27th August 2012

    Helpful informative answer, Chris. Thanks even though I didn't start this thread. I'd forgotten that bit of info but you've jogged my memory.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Ambridge Forever Frittering (U5978873) on Monday, 27th August 2012

    I can remember being in the computer room* at work, worrying about Chris and thinking over Pat`s wise, kind words to Susan. And Eddie`s funny, strangely sensitive reaction: "All babies look the same. Like Winston Churchill." Okay, not original, but said so nicely. Can`t remember what Neil actually said, but I know he did not have the same horrified reaction as Susan`s.

    *I realise I should have been thinking about my work. But don`t worry. I wasn`t in charge of air traffic control or the space programme or anything to do with the military. Just a mundane task of changing tapes to do with the computer system at the library where I worked.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by toffee (U8026926) on Monday, 27th August 2012

    I clearly recal that Chris was born with a cleft palate which meant hysterical Susan found it difficult to bond with hin but this is never mentioned and he speaks much better than the rest of his family. Has he necer been teased or bullied for this disability? 

    Ha! On the very page I'm reading of this book....

    Former Archers editor Liz Rigby on life ....

    'Christopher Carter and Alice Aldridge were my two babies. And it makes me feel very old now if I switch on and hear their grown-up voices and remember that I conceived them'

    Christopher was born with a hare lip which gradually repaired itself over the ensuing years to the point where he became Ambridge's 'babe magnet'

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Germander (U15508652) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    BBC seemed to chicken out of the opportunity to see Chris through childhood as a genuine cleft person - at increased risk of hearing problems, speech problems, likely to need further surgery, dental treatment including braces in teenage years, very unlikely to be considered anyone's heartthrob, and more likely than most to be bullied at school.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Squiddish (U15508087) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    It's odd that they never mention his musical activities either !

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by lsd25 (U14674472) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    BBC seemed to chicken out of the opportunity to see Chris through childhood as a genuine cleft person - at increased risk of hearing problems, speech problems, likely to need further surgery, dental treatment including braces in teenage years, very unlikely to be considered anyone's heartthrob, and more likely than most to be bullied at school.  I'm a 47 year old genuine cleft person. I have a slight woolliness in my hearing and my speech is slightly more sibilant than people on the other end of phones can easily understand, otherwise I haven't been afflicted by any of other problems mentioned. Plus, I'm gorgeous!

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Lemon Sabotage (U9577550) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    "a genuine cleft person"

    I find this a very odd way to describe someone.
    Surely a person who is less severely affected by a condition than some other people are, is no less "genuine" for that?

    Just because the writers didn't devise this as a storyline about a long-term disability, doesn't mean that they shouldn't have had it as a storyline at all.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    Ummm..... I teach two children who have had surgery to repair a cleft pallet. Quite truthfully it took me a while to really notice. The scar is very faint and makes no impact on their looks IMO

    I have never noticed any problem at with speech

    One has had a lot of work done on his teeth and I can see some of that has to do with the cleft pallet however every second child has braces anyway

    I think the idea of them being teased etc or less attractive is a bit old fashioned

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by lsd25 (U14674472) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    "a genuine cleft person"

    I find this a very odd way to describe someone.
    Surely a person who is less severely affected by a condition than some other people are, is no less "genuine" for that?

    Just because the writers didn't devise this as a storyline about a long-term disability, doesn't mean that they shouldn't have had it as a storyline at all. 
    Exactly...

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    Bluddy heck rb you are tired. Wrong palate spelling.... sorry!

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by moffettthemog (U15279786) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    I clearly recal that Chris was born with a cleft palate which meant hysterical Susan found it difficult to bond with hin but this is never mentioned and he speaks much better than the rest of his family. Has he necer been teased or bullied for this disability?  An understatement - she rejected him point blank. It has never stopped her passing judgement on anyone else. Strange, that.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Dippergirl (U13652679) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    BBC seemed to chicken out of the opportunity to see Chris through childhood as a genuine cleft person - at increased risk of hearing problems, speech problems, likely to need further surgery, dental treatment including braces in teenage years, very unlikely to be considered anyone's heartthrob, and more likely than most to be bullied at school.  The BBC did do their research at the time - they were in contact with CLAPA (Cleft lip and palate association). I know the person they consulted - she has a son with the condition, though he is more severely affected than Christopher was and had a number of operations throughout his childhood. I think it's a condition that can vary greatly in severity, and Chris was obviously one of the less severe cases.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by strokecitydave (U5467417) on Tuesday, 20th November 2012

    I clearly recal that Chris was born with a cleft palate which meant hysterical Susan found it difficult to bond with hin but this is never mentioned and he speaks much better than the rest of his family. Has he necer been teased or bullied for this disability?  IIRC it was only a cleft lip, not palate. My younger son had both and speaks perfectly (now aged 30) - albeit in some sort of ungrammatical Kentish way ("we was" etc., etc.)

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    I also thought Christopher was born with a cleft lip, not palate. This is the condition that used be commonly called a "hare lip" but that is now considered and offensive term but migt have been referred to as such on air when Chris was born. I suppose, like any other condition which requires surgery, the severity can vary and many children are left with a hardly visible scar and no audible difference to their voice.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Lady Trudie Tilney Glorfindel Maldini (U2222312) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    BBC seemed to chicken out of the opportunity to see Chris through childhood as a genuine cleft person - at increased risk of hearing problems, speech problems, likely to need further surgery, dental treatment including braces in teenage years, very unlikely to be considered anyone's heartthrob, and more likely than most to be bullied at school. 

    What an odd choice of thread to dredge up from three months ago. Any particular reason?

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Redbookish (U1335018) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    Single issue poster? Disabilities awareness campaigner?

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Lemon Sabotage (U9577550) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    Oh, I'd no idea that the term "hare lip" was now considered offensive, so thanks for that information.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by rick_yard_withdrawn (U14573092) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    Oh, I'd no idea that the term "hare lip" was now considered offensive, so thanks for that information.  Yes, it was a cleft lip - Susan said to someone its really called a "hare lip" as if to conjure up all the stigma she felt was associated with it. Mary Webb wrote as lurid novel based on this stigma, I believe...?

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by dickie (U2267358) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    Why? Do hares find it offensive?

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Wednesday, 21st November 2012

    According to TA at the time, Christopher had a unilateral cleft palate and a hare lip. This was operated on after three months and the operation was a complete success, leaving no sign but a small scar on his upper lip.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Lee Shore (U14673711) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    Offensive by whom?

    I wonder sometimes about PC terminology whether those with the condition are offended or some jobsworth seeking status working with them create the offence and then boost their own self importance creating a defence strategy through guilt complex projection.

    There must be a whole department at the BBC dealibng with this and set to expand following the JS and LM debacles.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    <quote>Offensive by whom?

    By the Cleft Lip & Palate Association and many of its members. By parents of children with a cleft. By people who are born with a cleft.

    There may be some who might not mind, but just as it is no longer acceptable to use the term "Mongol" to refer to someone with Downs Syndrome or "Spastic" for those with cerebal palsy, or "retard" for someone with learning difficulties, most people with a cleft or who have a person in their family with a cleft would rather the term was not used. And I think think that is fair enough.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    I wonder why it would be so unacceptable to be compared to one of the least offensive species of animal in the country. The hare is an animal nobody need be in the least ashamed of.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    I think it is because having an hare lip was seen as being cursed. Mary Webb writes about this in Precious Bane.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Dee (U3082905) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    But if people who have this condition do not want to be compared with a member of the wild animal kingdom, no matter how cute & fluffy, then I think that we, especially those of us fortunate not to have it, should respect that.
    As one mother said of her child "my son is a human baby, not a bunny rabbit"

    There is nothing wrong with being an indigenous person from Mongolia either but to call someone with Down's Syndrome a "Mongol" is unacceptable. I wonder when Vicky & Mike's baby is born, if we willhear someone say that word & be told why it isn't the accepted term.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    Anyone who cannot tell a "bunny rabbit" from a hare is not deserving of anything in particular apart from a vague feeling that she is being rather stupid, as far as I am concerned.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Lady Trudie Tilney Glorfindel Maldini (U2222312) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    Which is also irrelevant to the fact that comparing someone's appearance to an animal may cause that person offence.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Sixties Relic SAVE ML (U13777237) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    I've said this on other threads but I always imagine Chris looking like Rudi Nureyev who had a repaired cleft lip and a bit of a scar - which made him look (I know not why) very, very sexy.



    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by conductor (U2040502) on Thursday, 22nd November 2012

    I know a couple of chaps with cleft lips which they obviously had repaired in early childhood - they both have slight scars but otherwise don't seem to have any trouble - in fact one of them is a professional horn-player.

    However I think the reason they seem sexy is because the scar makes you stare at their mouth, which is rather an intimate thing to do.

    --<-@

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by alanthefocusman (U15614262) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    I am more concerned that the letter ' T ' seems not to exist in Chris Carters vocabulary. He often uses words like 'BU ER' instead of Butter.
    LE. ER instead of LETTER, or phrases such as 'See you LAY. ER on' instead of 'See you LATER on' it sounds ugly and false. Just like our old Prime Minister,Tony Blair and his phoney glotteral stops. This from the home of received pronunciation. Is he a posh boy trying to sound like a man of the people or a bad actor? Give it up please Chris you are painful to listen to, or maybe you don't think speaking properly 'MA. ERS' any more

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Roger (U2285823) on Wednesday, 13th February 2013

    But are the people with clefts offended, or are others offended on their behalf?

    At 62, I could be offended by being called old (implying past it). It's truly discriminatory, but seems fair game to most people. It's true in their eyes, I put up with it.

    Report message33

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