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Emma and Ed - financial crisis

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 59
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Dare one suggest charity shops for Kiera's new clothes? They do wash and are perfectly good - it's not as if the baby's going to know. My mum used to volunteer in one when my kids were small and gave me all kinds of stuff for them - lovely warm winter coats, jumpers etc - saved me a fortune. Not shoes though - I did draw the line at that. And as for food, I wonder whether Emma's the kind of girl to whip up a nice pasta meal from leftovers, and make seasonal (cheap) veg, and pulses, go a long way? I expect she's more of a supermarket basics fishfingers buyer. Perhaps I'm being unfair, but am partly going on the ludicrous amounts spent on the recent wedding of the year. I bet I could reduce her shopping bills.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by barwick_green (U2668006) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Emmur has got what she always wanted; her man who 'looked so hot in his toight whoite t-shirt'. Stupid stupid girl.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by elizabeth church (U14285872) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    The trouble with those suggests is that they take EFFORT.
    I love charity shops. I also Love quality.
    Good quality can be found in expensive areas. Children grow very quickly and cast-offs are often in very good condition.
    I also shop at 5 p.m on Thursday afternoon.
    Shops often discount heavily so that they can re stock for the weekend.
    I have bought meat priced at £13 reduced to £3.(put in the freezer)
    Bread priced at over £1 reduced to 10p. (ditto) BTW this is Waitrose!
    At this time of year many people might have a surplus of veg. Vegetarian food is cheaper. Also vegetables freeze.
    Could Emma do the milk round or is that job reserved for Jamie?

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dora Pandle (U14741938) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    As her ambitions and working background were in catering, I think she can probably cook more than fish fingers.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    The trouble with those suggests is that they take EFFORT.
    I love charity shops. I also Love quality.
    Good quality can be found in expensive areas. Children grow very quickly and cast-offs are often in very good condition.
    I also shop at 5 p.m on Thursday afternoon.
    Shops often discount heavily so that they can re stock for the weekend.
    I have bought meat priced at £13 reduced to £3.(put in the freezer)
    Bread priced at over £1 reduced to 10p. (ditto) BTW this is Waitrose!
    At this time of year many people might have a surplus of veg. Vegetarian food is cheaper. Also vegetables freeze.
    Could Emma do the milk round or is that job reserved for Jamie? 


    I know, I've bought some beautiful things in them, and at jumble sales etc, The secret, as you say, is to go to ones in wealthy areas - worth the trip! I've got some beautiful silk scarves which I got for 50p each for example. And I once bought my daughter (aged three at the time) a Laura Ashley party dress for a pound. She never wore dresses and only had it on once before I sent it back to that or another charity shop, but she did looke sweet (for once) and they were about £75 in LA.

    As for food, I seldom buy anything at full price. There's always quite a lot of splitting and freezing to do when I get home, but it's worth it. I know Emma has two young children, but she doesn't really work as well, as I did. I'm not knocking her, or anyone else of her generation. It's far from being their fault, but people have brought up bigger families in harder times.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by elizabeth church (U14285872) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I wonder if they are getting all the benefits they are due.
    Child TAX credits, are available for couples earning up to £35,000 a year. Also help with child care.
    Housing benefit and council tax benefit are there too for families on low income.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Who knows. I really do hope Emma goes back to proper work soon, perhaps starting with a FE course of some sort. She's capable of so much more.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    The thing with emma though is it seems she can't be bothered in a way. There is just not a lot of planning in her life... and a fair bit of moaning.

    I don't mean she isn't a hard worker... she is but the planning has been sadly lacking and unless she some how changes I think the college course etc are unlikely

    It has always been about wants with emma

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by borsetshirebee (U15362979) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Could Emma do the milk round or is that job reserved for Jamie? 

    As Ed is busy with the cows at that time who would look after Keira, and get George to school when he's there?

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Where_IS_Planet_Archer (U14598574) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I wonder if they are getting all the benefits they are due.
    Child TAX credits, are available for couples earning up to £35,000 a year. Also help with child care.
    Housing benefit and council tax benefit are there too for families on low income.  
    Housing benefit? I thought they were in the cottage as part remuneration for Emma's cleaning - I've never heard mention of paying rent.

    Do the dopeys pay Emma cash in hand, or operate PAYE and NI?

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Lowena (U14575314) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I worked full time and long hours when my kids were young ( I was a Headteacher ). We lived on fish fingers, burgers and pizza - never did us any harm. Don't be so snobbish. Asda do lovely children's clothes, cheap and good quality for little ones, and they're new and on trend.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by borsetshirebee (U15362979) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    . I know Emma has two young children, but she doesn't really work as well, as I did. I'm not knocking her, or anyone else of her generation. It's far from being their fault, but people have brought up bigger families in harder times. 

    I would hope not. She works at Brookfield doing the cleaning , and I imagine there is plenty to do.
    Also do she and Ed even have a car? Does she drive? If not bulk buying in the supermarket is tricky and I doubt if she's got a lot of freezer space.
    As to shopping late in the day, its not ideal with a tired George after school and a fractious infant. I would imagine she shops after lunch having finished working at Brookfield and before picking up George.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by borsetshirebee (U15362979) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Asda do lovely children's clothes, cheap and good quality for little ones, and they're new and on trend. 

    Likewise Matalan and Primark. Its not worth buying clothes in charity shops anymore, their prices have skyrocketed, unless you are lucky to spot something exceptionally good.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I worked full time and long hours when my kids were young ( I was a Headteacher ). We lived on fish fingers, burgers and pizza - never did us any harm. Don't be so snobbish. Asda do lovely children's clothes, cheap and good quality for little ones, and they're new and on trend.  Don't be so snobbish 

    How is recommending charity shops and bargains in general being snobbish? I don't believe anybody said that the food items you mention were harmful in any way. And, as a headteacher, I assume you are familiar with the imperative mood? Its use can seem rather offensive.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by cherrytree (U9175528) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I think I'm going to sound snobbbish here, but I don't mean to be. Going to charity shops and NCT sales is I'm afraid mostly a middle class activity at least it is where I live. I see Emma as an extension of her mum in some ways-aspirational when it comes to material things anyway. Emma wouldn't be seen dead in a charity shop.She would worry about who saw her going in for one thing. (She doesn't sound like a Boden shopper either by the way). So buying new would be important and there will be lots of pink I'm sure. I wrote on another board last week that Asda baby items are excellent value-one of my daughters says they don't shrink like some M andS ones do. I bet there's a huge Asda on the by-pass.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    And Emma appears to have got Kiera's pyjamas cheaper than at Asda, Matalan or wherever by buying them on line. I used to get some children's clothes (underwear, nightwear etc) VERY cheaply from the reduced basket in Ethel Austin (gone now). I doubt whether that marks me as middle class even if the charity shop shopping does.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    They rented Rickyard Cottage furnished in 2008, and the rent was reduced to a rate they could afford because Emma cleaned at Brookfield farmhouse for one day a week. I don't think that her Brookfield hours have been increased; until recently she had another job as well, so they couldn't have been, and it hasn't been mentioned that they have increased after she stopped working at Lower Loxley. It is possible that it is two days a week, but certainly there are days that are not Emma's day at Brookfield, because that has been said at least once.

    Whether she is still cleaning for Ian and Adam I have no idea: it hasn't been mentioned for years, not since she took Ed over there so he could have a good giggle about how the other half lives and nose about in the bedroom.

    She gave Pip lifts to Lower Loxley and Ed has driven home in a hurry in the recent past, so presumably she and Ed have a car.

    People who do have jobs have to manage to shop after work, and their children are presumably around at that point; Ed could look after the children when he has finished work whilst Emma went shopping. Or, given that supermarkets are open until late evening these days (and Tesco all night) she could shop after George's supper while Ed babysat.

    Why would Keira be grizzling any more at five in the evening than at two in the afternoon?

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Wasn't it shoes that Keira needed? I wonder if Hayley passes on Abbie's clothes to Em? It is the sort of thing my daughter and her friends do and they aren't as hard up as Em and Ed but can't see the point in buying everything new.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Emma is a good cook - but she hasn't got transport has she so it is hard to get to the supermarket at times when the reductions go on display.

    Friends say it is so much harder to be poor in the country than in the town - fuel costs, lack of competition between local shops, high heating costs if one doesn't have a log burner etc etc ....

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    < We lived on fish fingers, burgers and pizza - never did us any harm. Don't be so snobbish. >

    It isn't snobbish to want to feed one's family good quality inexpensive food. None of the things you mention are good value for money - too much fat, salt and starch.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Anna, as I said in 17, Ed and Em certainly have had a car until recently -- Ed drove home in a hurry when Emma telephoned him, and Emma gave Pip lifts to Lower Loxley.

    I would have thought that someone might have mentioned it if they were so poor they'd had to give up the motor. When Eddie has to replace his car there is always a stonking great fuss made.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by cherrytree (U9175528) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    "Why would Keira be grizzling more at five in the evening than at two?".
    I used to dread the time after about 4.30 pm with my four when they were little. They were getting tired and were getting peckish. Thirty year later I still finding myself looking at the clock around thn with a sort of sinking feeling until I pull myself up short. wsith a huge sigh of relief.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    They might have a car but Em might not always have access to it at times when the supermarkets put out their cheap stuff. And yes after school is often a time when children are tetchy and it isn't a good time to drag them round the supermarket.

    I expect there are still ways Em can cut back but I think the point of the story was to show that they are having struggle and I welcome the fact that reality affects at least one family in the enclave.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by JustJanie - Fairweather Strider (U10822512) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    << I welcome the fact that reality affects at least one family in the enclave. >>

    Only isn't it a shame that Ed and Emma have to have the only grumpy baby in Ambridge? And be the ones feeling the pinch when Brookfield and Bridge Farm have made such miraculous recoveries from their financial woes.

    Actually, that reminds me of Vicky S's brilliant parody 'Trouble Up At t'Dell' in Fantasy Archers where she has the Ambridge Fairies visited by OFSTED:
    'The Official Fairy Standards Team for Equality and Democracy will be Inspecting the Ambridge Dell Fairy Commune to ensure that appropriate fairy assistance has been brokered to the local Community in accordance with the Equal Access and Fairy Fairness Regulations laid down in Memorandum 101 sub Section 34 Revised 2007.'

    It's a wonderful read, do check it out! www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    It is a shame but realistic. But I'm sure that the Tuckers will soon be in a similar boat soon.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Yes quite realistic.........

    Helen should really have been in the same boat but for her parents generous support

    Ed was right though when he wanted to put off having another child. As far as we know Emma never really asked him again and it just happened

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by snarklehound (U15065053) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Emma could train to be a registered childminder. Rickyard would pass necessary checks (don't mention the stampede which the fairies have sorted out now) and then she could look after three under-fives and three under eights. She'd be much in demand with the middle-class blow-ins and it doesn't take a fortune to set up. Can't imagine the Dopeys would object and she could tailor her hours to keep her cleaning job. It only takes a bit of sense and application. Oh....er....I see....well, maybe not Emma...

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by borsetshirebee (U15362979) on Sunday, 19th August 2012


    Or, given that supermarkets are open until late evening these days (and Tesco all night) she could shop after George's supper while Ed babysat.

    Why would Keira be grizzling any more at five in the evening than at two in the afternoon? 


    The point made earlier was that supermarkets often have end of day reductions, but that doesnt apply to the 24 hour ones.

    Babies and toddlers are often grizzlier by late afternoon, beginning to get tired and often hungry. Too often one sees mums resorting to sweets or crisps to soothe them too, leading, I often think, to food refusal and faddiness at dinner time.

    I thought Emma's days had been increased, but maybe I am wrong - you are right though she does have days off, a welcome escape I imagine.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    snarklehound, I don't think that three toddlers, three older children and an adult would be able to fit into Rickyard Cottage. It's too small. It was described by one of its tenants, some time during the eighties, as "too small to swing a cat".. Mike and Betty lived there briefly but when Roy was born in 1978 there wasn't room for them and a baby so they had to move out.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Purple_Hay (U14319650) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    They aren't Archers so unlike Pat and Tony they won't have a financial miracle, funny that right on script writers seem snobbish in some respects.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    My local Tesco is a 24 hour supermarket.

    It has reduced-price meat and cooked meat and fish and cheese and ready-meals, particularly at about six in the evening. At that time of day the "reduced" section of the cold storage area overflows with them and the prices go down from "half" to "silly" to get rid of them before they go out of date.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by borsetshirebee (U15362979) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    My local Tesco is a 24 hour supermarket.

    It has reduced-price meat and cooked meat and fish and cheese and ready-meals, particularly at about six in the evening. At that time of day the "reduced" section of the cold storage area overflows with them and the prices go down from "half" to "silly" to get rid of them before they go out of date. 


    OK fair point. I never buy food from the reduced chilled section. The bread section at my 24 hr is never reduced though, while a smaller one I go to sometimes does reduce bread (and pastries smiley - winkeye ).

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    This 24 hour one has a reduced section (one of those tall trolley-palette things with many shelves) for bread and cakes, and a section for fruit and veg plus a trolley when there are a lot of those.

    I have never seen reduced-price frozen goods, but then I haven't looked. There is a section at the end of one aisle where there are "dry goods" like split and repaired packets of rice and biscuits and sweets and so one, though. Occasionally you see stationary and rucksacks and candles and suchlike in that one.

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    That was meant to be "stationery". Sigh. I even *thought* about it, decided it needed an e, and then went ahead and used an a anyway and didn't notice.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Dailyfix (U14602649) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Although middle class I was brought up thrifty and lived in poverty as a student. We went to the supermarket at reduction time buying whatever was reduced and freezing. We lived on dishes made from scratch with own brand, frozen and tinned products. Even today I scour the grocery flyers and buy most of my groceries on offer. I went to ASDA once a month when I lived in England to stock up on store cupboard essentials as they were cheapest there. When my kids were little we bought and sold clothes and toys at NCT sales, and even though they go to private schools I am a regular at used uniform sales.
    As was pointed out these savings require initiative, pre planning and drive all of which are in short supply generally with the Ed and Emmur types which adds to their financial struggles.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I put it down (my thriftiness, aka tightarsedness) to my working class origins which were succeeded by student poverty, a wasteful period as dinkies, then a family to support. We're okay now, but I still can't resist a bargain. I guess it's a kind of hobby/obsession.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by snarklehound (U15065053) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Chris, I've known a lot of very successful and caring childminders manage in two-bedroom houses, but it does need careful planning and support from OH.

    One other thing that always makes me wonder is how few TA characters in full-time work have evening or weekend jobs in addition. Clarrie and Eddie are excellent examples of this but are often portrayed as scammers when they are really as enterprising as a bunch of yokel-hating SWs allow them to be. Ditto Jazzer.

    Why doesn't the milk-round also deliver other useful stores? Our milkman offers everything from dairy produce through Christmas hampers to garden supplies. Frozen boar steaks, anyone?

    TA non-farming characters all too often seem to have generous lunch hours (with food pressed on them by solicitous partners) and to regard 5.00pm as knocking off time, with weekends sacrosanct. As for farmers taking holidays in August, one or two of my acquaintance fell about laughing.

    I can't wait for Cowditz, doubtless to be supplied with a system of clocking-on.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by EBGB (U2613853) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    (my thriftiness, aka tightarsedness) 
    I put mine down to being born that way. My parents paid my pocket money in smaller denominations than my sister's, because I thought it meant I had more (actually had less). Immortal family legend is that, age about 7, I twigged that the local bookshop didn't rotate its Ladybird books & so used to rummage through the stock to find the cheapest ones still in the stand. Definitely a state of mind!

    PS. If it's relevant, and you've not tried them yet, offset mortgages were made for us.

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Snork, EBGB! We are two of a kind, I think. Bit late for getting a mortgage now, though - OH and I both retired, although I despair of ever actually reaching the ever-receding State retirement age. Just an occupational pension at the moment for me (OH gets his).

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I wouldn't have thought ed and em were particularly splashing their cash around... that seems unfair....... they just have a miserably tight level of income.

    In common with many in this country.

    Even endless 'thriftiness' will only go so far when your incomings are less than outgoing and emmas earnings must have made a difference.

    I think we are going to have ed and mikes toy heard go bust and they will be competing for the manager job at the cow gulag dairy.

    Neither will get it... some new cow girl will

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by elizabeth church (U14285872) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I'm sure that they pay some rent as the hours she works for R and D wouldn't cover it all. Housing and Council Tax benefit bmay make up the difference.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    But Rickyard is tiny and I don't think it has a garden so I don't think she could do childminding there.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    I'm the same Star. I do like a bargain but also good quality. As my old granny said look after the pennies and the pounds look after themselves.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    < I despair of ever actually reaching the ever-receding State retirement age. Just an occupational pension at the moment for me (OH gets his). >

    Snap!

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by The Leech Pedlar (U15129703) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Why doesn't the milk-round also deliver other useful stores? Our milkman offers everything from dairy produce through Christmas hampers to garden supplies. Frozen boar steaks, anyone? 

    Good point, Snarkle.
    The local milkman here, does the same. Disposable nappies and even pet-food as well. It's increasingly more like a mobile shop these days.

    How is it that the Money-fairy - forever at the beck and call of anybody named Archer - doesn't sort out the problems of others?

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Sunday, 19th August 2012

    Hello, Anna! Long time no speak. Yes, I agree, and the irony is that quality needn't cost much, whereas a ridiculous amount can be spent on rubbish. Hope you're wellxxxx

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by borsetshirebee (U15362979) on Monday, 20th August 2012

    When my kids were little we bought and sold clothes and toys at NCT sales, and even though they go to private schools I am a regular at used uniform sales.


    LOL you need to be if they have one of those absurdly expensive uniforms with tartan pleated skirts and bound edged blazers or similar so beloved of private schools, and all to be bought at just ONE shop of course.

    One of mine went just to nursery at a private school, which had a unique and absurdly expensive gym slip, which most parents would buy almost down to their ankles so they lasted until junior school (at least). I couldn't believe my luck when I spotted some almost identical fabric in the exact shade and was able to make her two, sensible length, so she was one of the few little girls with one that actually fitted.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Monday, 20th August 2012

    < I wouldn't have thought ed and em were particularly splashing their cash around... that seems unfair....... they just have a miserably tight level of income.

    In common with many in this country. >


    Agreed. And I welcome this nod to reality.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Monday, 20th August 2012

    My daughter seems to have inherited my eye for a bargain too.

    I'm fine, Star. Warm weather always agrees with me.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by StargazerwithOscar (U14668197) on Monday, 20th August 2012

    Let's hope it lasts.

    Report message50

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