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So is Vicky actually ill,

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Messages: 51 - 81 of 81
  • Message 51

    , in reply to message 50.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Thursday, 21st June 2012

    This year we have had (counting backwards from now)
    Carole Simpson Solazzo
    Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti
    Graham Harvey
    Nawal Gadalla
    Tim Stimpson
    Caroline Harrington
    Mary Cutler
    Keri Davies
    Adrian Flynn
    Joanna Toye
    Simon Frith
    Carolyn Sally Jones

    I make it twelve. Not all were noted on this website when I went and looked, and the missing two were not the most recvent arrivals. That may of course have been corrected by now.

    Report message1

  • Message 52

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dinah Shore (U14984316) on Thursday, 21st June 2012

    Vicky is neither I'll nor work shy.

    She is tired.

    She works two days a week at the dentist.

    She looks after Abbie (unpaid) so that Roy and Hayley can be paid for working for That Woman, and not have to pay for childminding.

    She volunteers in the shop.

    She runs Mike's house for him. She even has sex with him.

    She's just a bit bushed.

    Report message2

  • Message 53

    , in reply to message 52.

    Posted by George Taylor (U15310242) on Thursday, 21st June 2012

    Is it not just that they can't afford an extra actress for a few episodes? The contortions that take place to cover for someone who should be there but hasn't been employed that week are wonderful!

    Report message3

  • Message 54

    , in reply to message 51.

    Posted by Listener1969 (U14683000) on Thursday, 21st June 2012

    This year we have had (counting backwards from now)
    Carole Simpson Solazzo
    Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti
    Graham Harvey
    Nawal Gadalla
    Tim Stimpson
    Caroline Harrington
    Mary Cutler
    Keri Davies
    Adrian Flynn
    Joanna Toye
    Simon Frith
    Carolyn Sally Jones

    I make it twelve. Not all were noted on this website when I went and looked, and the missing two were not the most recvent arrivals. That may of course have been corrected by now. 
    This speaks volumes!!!! How can 12 different scriptwriters maintain any degree of continuity? Why do they employ so many? One wonders just how many of these people actually listen to the programme, or - indeed - knew anything about it prior to being asked to contribute an episode or two! "What a carry-on," as my old nanny would have said! But that was back in 1968 when things were just "hotting up" after GB was pushed out.

    Report message4

  • Message 55

    , in reply to message 53.

    Posted by JoinedPeetsBoard_Smeesues_too (U14519481) on Thursday, 21st June 2012

    While I wondered that - but they employ them for recording sessions taken over a period of time. So they wouldn't have to pay her much for a few extra lines since she has been in it recently ..
    JPBS

    Report message5

  • Message 56

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by The Lord of Misrule (U14664534) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    I think you'll find that nut allergies are pretty much unheard of in the non-English speaking world

    Report message6

  • Message 57

    , in reply to message 56.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    That there is no word for their malaise doesn't help the people who suffer them, I don't suppose.

    Report message7

  • Message 58

    , in reply to message 57.

    Posted by Listener1969 (U14683000) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    That there is no word for their malaise doesn't help the people who suffer them, I don't suppose.  I think the Lord was meaning that we don't seem to have them outside the UK, not that they are not recognised. I teach here in Russia full time and these allergies just don't seem to exist at all. Also when I taught in France. I think it's to do with our diet here.

    Report message8

  • Message 59

    , in reply to message 58.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    Yes, I know what you mean, Listener. It’s only when I am in England that I hear all about nut allergies, food colour allergies, bean allergies etc and I’m sure it’s mainly to do with the eating of processed foods (or in the case of pulses undercooked food, leading to poisoning). It now seems to be the thing, when inviting someone to dinner to ask if they have any allergies? It never used to be the case.

    As for ME – I have an open mind about it but it does seem to be such an all-encompassing, slippery syndrome that it’s difficult to determine precisely what it is, especially when the diagnosis is self-diagnosis, as it usually is. But it does seem to be a condition that is more prevalent in the Anglo-Saxon countries and Northern Europe than anywhere else.

    Report message9

  • Message 60

    , in reply to message 59.

    Posted by PigPharma (U15299493) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    All we need now is some compassionate contributor to remind us that food intolerance/allergy was unheard of in Auschwitz Birkenau.



    Report message10

  • Message 61

    , in reply to message 58.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    I have an allergy to peas, beans and lentils -- all the pulses, in fact. The protien in them only; I can eat beansprouts without ill effects.

    It was clear from the day I was weaned that these foods made me unwell. I went a funny colour if I ate them, and tended to me sick. I also tended to try to spit them out, from about the third or fourth time they were offered.

    I don't think I invented it; it took fourteen years before it was "discovered" by a medic that I had an allergy rather than disliking some foods.

    At that time "allergy" was not a synonym for "dislike", as it frequently became later on. Most people had never heard the word, and I had to explain what it meant.

    Now, about this "diet" idea... Do you have peas, beans and lentils in your diet?

    Report message11

  • Message 62

    , in reply to message 61.

    Posted by Listener1969 (U14683000) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    I have an allergy to peas, beans and lentils -- all the pulses, in fact. The protien in them only; I can eat beansprouts without ill effects.

    It was clear from the day I was weaned that these foods made me unwell. I went a funny colour if I ate them, and tended to me sick. I also tended to try to spit them out, from about the third or fourth time they were offered.

    I don't think I invented it; it took fourteen years before it was "discovered" by a medic that I had an allergy rather than disliking some foods.

    At that time "allergy" was not a synonym for "dislike", as it frequently became later on. Most people had never heard the word, and I had to explain what it meant.

    Now, about this "diet" idea... Do you have peas, beans and lentils in your diet?  
    Yes, we eat them all very often. But I think our diet is based on Kasha, bread, meat, fermented salads (for winter), sour cream etc. Our schools have very strict controls and must only serve food home cooked in the kitchens. Any kind of processed (chemical) food is forbidden. We have sausage etc. and it's very popular but not containing chemicals.

    From a young age, children eat "adult food" and do not choose their dishes. In the school canteen there is always homemade soup, kasha cutlets, potatoes, buns and pastries - all home made. A three course meal is about 40 rubles, including comport or tea.

    When we take children on trains, we have to obtain a special document to confirm that the food they will eat conforms to these standards.

    Report message12

  • Message 63

    , in reply to message 61.

    Posted by Listener1969 (U14683000) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    I have an allergy to peas, beans and lentils -- all the pulses, in fact. The protien in them only; I can eat beansprouts without ill effects.

    It was clear from the day I was weaned that these foods made me unwell. I went a funny colour if I ate them, and tended to me sick. I also tended to try to spit them out, from about the third or fourth time they were offered.

    I don't think I invented it; it took fourteen years before it was "discovered" by a medic that I had an allergy rather than disliking some foods.

    At that time "allergy" was not a synonym for "dislike", as it frequently became later on. Most people had never heard the word, and I had to explain what it meant.

    Now, about this "diet" idea... Do you have peas, beans and lentils in your diet?  
    PS I was not saying you don't have this problem - and I'm sorry if I gave that impression. What I was trying to say (and the Lord also, I think) was that maybe you would be able to enjoy the foods you are reacting against in the UK if you came here.

    Interestingly, we have many American university students who join us for our summer camps. They often arrive with these problems but end up eating everything here.

    Report message13

  • Message 64

    , in reply to message 62.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    My mother used not to have tins in the house. In the days before we had a fridge, even, let alone a freezer, all the food we ate was bought or picked that day or (in the case of meat) within the previous three days, and prepared on the day it was to be eaten. (We got a fridge when I was eight.)

    I believe there was a fish-and-chip shop in town; we never used it. If there was a Chinese takeaway I never noticed it: the first that I encountered was in another town when I was about fourteen. I didn't know what a supermarket *was* until I was eleven. I remember discovering that someone we knew went to Sainsbury's -- but we didn't have a car, so there was no easy way for us to go there because they were on the other side of town.

    I'm afraid that not all allergies are a product of modern eating; mine existed before modern styles of eating did, as far as I am concerned.

    (Incidentally and interestingly, it is thought that Henry V may have had a serious abreaction to cinnamon, not dissimilar to an allergy: court food always made him sick as a dog and he was lucky to survive childhood, so sickly was he while he ate it. On campaign he ate bread and cheese and was as fit as the next man, or fitter.)

    Report message14

  • Message 65

    , in reply to message 64.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    Chris, I think the court food of that time would make most people as sick as a dog. In fact I believe that right up to this century it was regarded as a sign of prosperity to eat very little in the way of vegetables and wholemeal bread as all that was peasant food. Although country people were poor, they were healthier than the toffs.

    But anyway....you pulses allergy. Pulses (especially lentils) can be poisonous if they are undercooked. I presume you have looked into this. But anyway, I don't suppose you would sell your birthright for a pottage of lentils.

    Report message15

  • Message 66

    , in reply to message 64.

    Posted by Dougals Servant (U7470526) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    Chris
    Allergy specialists are now recognising pulses as an "emerging allergen" - one that effects a significant number and not a very few individuals.
    You probably know that the prevalence of the major allergens varies around the world and Spain is a hot spot for pulses.

    Report message16

  • Message 67

    , in reply to message 66.

    Posted by AP (U14268795) on Friday, 22nd June 2012

    I wonder which allergies are the main ones in different counties? For example some population groups cannot tolerate milk, it not historically being a mainstay of their diet the way it was for many northern European groups. Could there be similar reason behind peanut and other allergies?

    In the past I was a bit sniffy about allergies, being hearty and healthy and surrounded by others blessed by similar robustness. It's easy to be sniffy in those circumstances!

    Report message17

  • Message 68

    , in reply to message 67.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    Is the Chinese condition an *allergy* to milk, or merely that the particular part of that racial group who have it don't benefit by drinking milk because they don't digest it? And if they don't digent milk how do they get their calcium, being as how even people who are allergic to lactose may be told by idiot doctors in this country that they have a calcium deficiency and therefore must drink more milk -- presumably milk is the usual source for the mineral which strengthens our bones and teeth.

    Ten per cent of this country's population are said to have a lactose intolerence, but very few have the severe condition in which drinking even a very small amount of milk swells their joints and causes them great pain. (I am talking about the amount of milk left on a spoon used to stir milky coffee then being used to stir their black coffee.) It's not a matter for academic interest for the few who have it that badly; and again, the person I knew who had it started to suffer from it in the thirties, when the diet in this country was not at all as it is now.

    I agree that it was rare and is now common; the difficulty for those of us with what I would call the real condition, as opposed to the more recent development, is that "Oh a little bit won't do youany harm" is simply not true: very small amounts can have a disproportionately great effect.

    Nobody doubts the need for anyone who is particularly reactive to insect stings to carry the medication that may save their lives; why is scorn poured on people with a similar reaction to other things? It's like being deaf: nobody mocks the blind for being blind, but being deaf is seen in some way as being deliberate, "he could hear me if he tried" rather than something with which to feel sympathy.

    Report message18

  • Message 69

    , in reply to message 68.

    Posted by Dougals Servant (U7470526) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    Chris
    The condition in China, and as far as I know other parts of Asia, is not an allergy but is lactose intolerance. Post breast-feeding there is no milk in the diet and the ability to produce the digestive enzyme falls away.

    Report message19

  • Message 70

    , in reply to message 69.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    Where do they then get their calcium? Genuine interest; in this country children in particular are meant to drink milk ofr their teeth and bones.

    (Lactose intolerance is in the same category as allergy, to my mind: a serious condition which may make the sufferer seriously unwell if it is ignored.)

    Report message20

  • Message 71

    , in reply to message 70.

    Posted by Dougals Servant (U7470526) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    Chris
    I just tend to separate the various types of adverse reactions to foods by mechanism as an easy way to classify them.
    The Asian diets have plentiful leafy greens and beans to provide calcium.
    Most of the Chinese I know here love knawing on bones and I suppose they must pick up a little that way!

    Report message21

  • Message 72

    , in reply to message 71.

    Posted by Chris Ghoti (U10794176) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    Makes sense. Thanks.

    None of this applies to Vicky, of course.

    In fact it is yet another thing I don't think we've ever had in Ambridge: someone who couldn't eat a particular sort fo food for any reason other than choice (two out of three -- Elizabeth and Kate) to annoy the parents) and subsequently forgotten. Or was Annette a vegetarian? I think there was something about Christmas dinner or a pub lunch or something...

    Report message22

  • Message 73

    , in reply to message 58.

    Posted by alanis (U2256129) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    They exist in France, I know a number of children who suffer from them. I do agree that food allergies seem to be far more frequent in the UK though, and also that it seems to be a more recent problem here.

    Diet would certainly seem to be a possible factor in that, but I've also heard childhood vaccination suggested too, perhaps by over-stimulating the immune systems of babies. I don't know whether public health policies in different countries were different enough for that to make a difference, but I'd love to know if there has been any research into it.

    Report message23

  • Message 74

    , in reply to message 72.

    Posted by Ginslinger Redux (U14830013) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    Annette was vegetarian when she arrived Ithink. Seem to remember Helen taking her somewhere for lunch when she first arrived because they had a better vegetarian menu than the Bull but then by the time she ordered Pizza for her and Annette and Leon IIRC it was a peculiar selection if there were 2 omnivores and one vegetarian.

    Report message24

  • Message 75

    , in reply to message 52.

    Posted by Where_IS_Planet_Archer (U14598574) on Saturday, 23rd June 2012

    She might be anaemic - she's the right age for fibroids

    Report message25

  • Message 76

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by joe (U13868420) on Thursday, 20th September 2012

    Just imagine Brendurr's response  Another past thread revisited. How wrong we were…

    Report message26

  • Message 77

    , in reply to message 67.

    Posted by Rose Sal Volatile Parade (U4705648) on Friday, 21st September 2012

    >>>In the past I was a bit sniffy about allergies,<<<

    Snork. More sniffy than the people with allergies were?

    Report message27

  • Message 78

    , in reply to message 76.

    Posted by Rose Sal Volatile Parade (U4705648) on Friday, 21st September 2012

    Interesting revival, Joe. I notice I lost my 20p comprehensively!

    It does show a consistency among many posters. Many people disliked Vicky pretty harshly before the pregnancy story, which helps with their take on the pregnancy, and many were anticipating a very different reaction from Brenda which backs up their claim that the Brenda aspect of this SL feels shoe-horned in without prior justification in the way she was drawn. (I'm one of those).

    Report message28

  • Message 79

    , in reply to message 78.

    Posted by joe (U13868420) on Friday, 21st September 2012

    AFAIC she has consistently failed to show any evidence of a heart*. Does that get you back your four bob?

    I agree totally about Brenda. There are all sorts of reasons why she might be expected to be, at the very least, resentful, but the personality fairies are clearly working overtime.




    *Pink fluffy ones held by teddies and bearing the legend "I ♥ Mr Bubbles" /don't/ count.

    Report message29

  • Message 80

    , in reply to message 79.

    Posted by Rose Sal Volatile Parade (U4705648) on Friday, 21st September 2012

    Had lunch today with family members who are Archers listeners. I asked them about the V and M story. They didn't like it much but not with serious objections, but they were very critical indeed of the Brenda part in it, and put it up there with Jill asking David not to give evidence as examples of characters just not being consistent.

    Sadly, I have to report, they also said that this effect, the personality change one, had put them off and they didn't listen as much any more.

    Report message30

  • Message 81

    , in reply to message 80.

    Posted by joe (U13868420) on Friday, 21st September 2012

    I suspect we're rapidly descending into WTOLhood…

    The prod team clearly dream of the day when they broadcast to a new generation of fresh-faced, sqeaky-voiced Pipalikes who find Rhys funny and AmEx justifiable.

    "The sun on the meadow is summery warm
    The stag in the forest runs free…"

    Report message31

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