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Emma at the Book Club? Ha ha

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 229
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Peggoi (U2316338) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    I don't think Emma can read, can she?

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by docklie (U7802187) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Why? Because she is working class?

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Nelson_G (U13801071) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Yes, that's the reason.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Vicky S (U2258400) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    On the contrary, Emma was always portrayed as a bright and intelligent girl with ambitions outside the enclave. It's only fairly recently (post George) that she has degenerated into a whiney slummock who would wear her pjs to the supermarket . Yet another example of character re branding.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by returnmigration (U14260026) on Sunday, 27th February 2011



    One suspects that the latest bonk-buster is more Emma's literary diet than some posh book "everyone is talking about".

    Get real Usha - Book Clubs are for middle-class women with time on their hands, not harassed working-class cleaners.

    Silly mare.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Pahnda (U14681704) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    I don't think Emma can read, can she?  I think she reads about as much as Ruth and Helen do.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Nelson_G (U13801071) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    There are some obvious candidates for the book club, Usha, Jim etc, but I can't imagine Emma showing much interest even if she had the time. I could see Nic giving it a go.

    I'd put Ruth in the 'just too busy' group. I see Helen as more of a 'self improvement' reader rather than a murder mystery type person.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by the apprentice (U14297115) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    However - her and her mum swop books. hmm imagine the genres there. or am I sterotyping ??

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Bear in the Bull (U2265029) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    I don't think Emma can read, can she?  I think she reads about as much as Ruth and Helen do.  Yes, Emma can read - she can read David's post before Ruth can get to it.

    Bear

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by JudithL (U14272244) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Which book were they proposing to read?
    Perhaps I wasn't listening properly - there's a surprise, eh? - but I didn't recognise either title or author. Then when Emma said, oh yes, she'd heard of him...
    I was part of a book club ages ago, but there's books and there's books. Just to say that something is on the Booker short list is enough to put me off, I'm afraid.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by hiya_loxley (U2274305) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    < I think she reads about as much as Ruth and Helen do. >
    like David's post?

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by shesings (U2666459) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Quite, Vicky Shortbread! Emma did well at school and her parents wanted her to go on to further education. I always found Emma's sudden loss of brain power even more irritating than the current nonsense with HellQueen. There is absolutely no reason why she shouldn't read and enjoy books.

    Nor is there any reason, beyond a strange intellectual snobbery, to suppose that Susan, who AFAIK did not get the opportunity of staying on at school, is not equally keen on reading.

    I know working class people who read history, biographies, serious novels, bodice rippers and the Beano! My next door neighbour's cleaner on reads all the books on the Booker shortlist every year and takes great pleasure in roaring at the judges if they get it wrong!

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by NotsoTinyTim (U2256329) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    It's middle-class characters and toffs like Deevid and the late Nigel whose reading material consists of the "Beano" - or the "Dandy" if they feel in the mood to tackle something really challenging.

    Nige was also partial to Daddy Gerald's old copies of "Health and Efficiency", which he used to take into the loo for norty purposes, until caught in the act, so to speak, by Lizzy.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by pan shoshana (U9947496) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    You find autodidacts wherever you go - class has nothing to do with it.

    Anyone can immerse themselves in everything the library has to offer (This week anyway, not sure whether it'll still be open tuesday fortnight), or find books all over the place if they want to.

    And, as for busyness - even when I had tiddlers around, I'd manage a page or two before nodding off, indeed losing oneself in a book is a great unwinder...

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Audrey Anynews (U14754412) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    I don't think Emma did badly at school, but not brilliantly, either. I seem to remember her getting four good GCSEs, and going on to do a catering course at college.

    Susan was disappointed that she didn't get five good GCSEs and go on to do 'A' levels.

    I honestly don't think Emma is much of a reader; she'd be far too knackered!

    Audrey xxxx

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Earldunda (U14196337) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Is she working class?

    More just a lazy adulterous slattern, full of malice and discontent.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by shesings (U2666459) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    'Lazy' people don't hold down two or three jobs at a time, Earldunda.

    I'm not an Emma fan but I wouldn't describe her as a slattern either. She is neither promiscous nor a stranger to soap and water.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by backsliding Pastrychef (U14565994) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Is she working class?

    More just a lazy adulterous slattern, full of malice and discontent. 
    Lazy? Have you got any evidence for this?
    Are all the women on the archers lazy, in your view?

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Hmmmmm

    Well the adulterous is I am afraid fact

    Malice and discontent. Well I would say discontent has been expressed often enough

    I don't remember direct 'malice' although she was cruel to Will over Georgie etc.

    Slattern... no evidence I think

    Lazy... well no she is hard working... but I suppose you could say she is 'lazy' in the way she has cut off opportunities in her life and hitched herself to relationships to get her places

    Sorry to butt in! It just caught my eye

    Book clubs are funny things. They normally become quite exclusive friendship groups. I think Emma reads as much as Brenda, Helen, Alice, Ruth oh etc etc etc

    As in virtually never. I can't remember the last book mentioned in TA other than a child's bed time story and that was Nic.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Earldunda (U14196337) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    It is only an opinion, of course, but having sexual relations with two brothers, whilst married to one of them, resulting in a pregnancy where the father could only be determined by a DNA test, is to me the mark of a slattern, and certainly could be classed as promiscuous.

    As could marrying one brother whilst having sex with the other.

    And like many women in this series, we hear a lot about her work, and how tired she is but how much she actually does is a different matter- for expamle insrtead of cleaning was she not nosing into a private letter she saw at David and Ruth's?

    She's a deeply unattractive character- even her own mother told her to cease moaning.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    I thought slattern meant messy around the house.....?

    Ummm off to check the meaning

    Have I always been wrong with that word?

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by backsliding Pastrychef (U14565994) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    I am not sure that I understand words in the same way as you.
    Promiscious to me implies a willingness to have sex with almost anyone. Emma has had two partners every as far as we know.
    Slattern implies untidy, dirty, lazy; I have heard no evidence over the years.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Sunday, 27th February 2011

    Ah OK... I have always known one meaning for slattern (slovenly) and never really thought about the other one


    www.thefreedictionar...

    Hmmm well no I don't think she is a slattern in either sense.

    Promiscuous... well that is harder. I would initially say no: she has had two sexual partners in her life which isn't many....

    www.thefreedictionar...

    Plus if you look at the definition there was nothing 'casual' about either of them.

    Not promiscuous at least not how I understand it.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by JoinedPeetsBoard_Smeesues_too (U14519481) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Book - can't remember exact name - it's about a real policeman from victorian times `Mr Wychmann (?)' who solved a murder case. It was a particularly horrible one of a young child. I've skimmed it as I bought it for OH who was reading a Wilkie Collins novel. The policeman from The Moonstone (Mr Cuff?) is supposed to be based on him.

    It was *not* a book I would chose for a book club! If I managed to read it I wouldn't like to discuss it.

    I think if I were Usha I would chose something like `South Riding'. It's on TV so - an easy introduction to it and the characters and story are engaging.

    JPBS

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Dirigibles was here (U7278225) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    The book Usha mentioned was 'The Suspicions of Mr Whicher'.

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  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by pollyanna (U7304225) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Yes Emma can read; as others have pointed out, apart from doing OK at school and at GCSE, she read David's letter (something which I think totally out of character for the real, Emma, who was a pretty 'live and let live' sort of person who wouldn't have cared one way or the other about David's correspondence, let alone actively nosing into it, and why she is now being rewritten as a mini-me of her mother I don't know, but that's another issue). But I suppose someone was bound to think it would be funny to assume a working class girl couldn't read.

    In fact Emma got the nub of the book club question, she asked : 'Why?' and Usha couldn't really respond. Emma said she read a lot anyway, she already swapped books and discussed them with her Mum, so what was the point of sitting around in a room talking.about them with other people? And Usha just made some sort of noise that indicated Emma was obviously too dim to understand, because actually Usha hasn't a clue herself really what the point is of the book club.

    But I suspect I know. BBC TV is in the throws of promoting books and reading, which is very admirable, and this is the radio tie in, in exactly the same way TAs has tied in with National Fertility Week or whatever it was called, and many other information campaigns in the past. No wonder Usha sounded a bit unclear herself about why she was forming the book club, she probably hasn't yet been sent over the remit from Broadcasting House.



    .

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by JudithL (U14272244) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    What puzzled me was Emma saying that she'd heard of the novel that Usha mentioned, although it sounded quite obscure to me.
    I can't imagine Emma having the time to sit down and read the kind of novel that book clubs tend to choose.
    But on the other hand, I don't understand the link that some posters are making between Emma's morals and her ability to read.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by aliencorrie (U7290756) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    The link is that Emma changed from a keen teenager who wanted to go to college to someone who slept with the brother of her fiance but went ahead with the wedding and now works as a cleaning lady in between pregnancies. Some time ago I remember her moaning about the dreariness of her life. Perhaps having a baby is not exactly opening attractive professional alternatives.

    She didn't say that she didn't like reading as such (Swapping books with Clarrie she claimed)
    It was the actual talking about the books she objected to. 'Too much like school'.
    Someone who aims for a more fulfilling career than being a cleaning lady all her life should perhaps consider that any kind of training would involve situations similar to school. I don't think that Emma would have any fun in Usha's Club but I thought Emma's dismissive attitude to a 'learning situation' remarkable.

    ac

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by GreenBrownBear (U14258765) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Since Book Clubs have been around for ever it always seemed unlikely to me that Ambridge didn't have one - would have thought it would be just JD's thing. As has been perceptively pointed out there is a terrible sense of TA taking on the Beeb's remit. Liked Emma's comment to Usha as well, there was a trace of the old, bright Emma who once had such promise as a character before the rotton old scripties joined her up with Ed. I'm wondering if she will end up getting bored with him now that life seems to be bearing down on her so heavily.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Tellmeboutit (U14478835) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    The Suspicions of Mr Witcher, a so-so best seller

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by pollyanna (U7304225) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Glad it wasn't just me Judith, I hadn't heard of it and was a bit surprised that Emma had. But I gather its going to be serialised on ITV very soon so perhaps we are supposed to assume Jennifer (for it is she who is suggesting the reading list) chose it thinking it would appeal to the masses for that reason.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Nemo399 (U14258777) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Perfectly plausible that Emma would have heard of The Suspicions of Mr Whicher (by Kate Summerscale, a non-fiction best seller that's won two literary awards; big piles of the book were visible in shops like WH Sm*ths a while back) : quite a good choice by Usha---judging from the book's page on Am*zon where readers have posted 200 plus reviews, it's divided reader's responses.

    What is annoying is the way Emma's being depicted as being someone who does read but who thinks a discussion would be troo much 'like school'---a phrase you might expect to hear from someone who recently left school, but not from a young woman who left school a while back and is supposed to matured a little----at least, that's how she was being presented about a year ago. But now, she's regressed into a dismal, dull whinger.

    Still---could the Sws be making a link between Mr Whicher' suspicion about the Hill House Murder and Emma's suspicions about Nigel's plummet off the roof? Well, perhaps not....they're not that subtle!

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by sunnyakasonnycitizen (U14405687) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Yes Emma can read; as others have pointed out, apart from doing OK at school and at GCSE, she read David's letter (something which I think totally out of character for the real, Emma, who was a pretty 'live and let live' sort of person who wouldn't have cared one way or the other about David's correspondence, let alone actively nosing into it, and why she is now being rewritten as a mini-me of her mother I don't know, but that's another issue). But I suppose someone was bound to think it would be funny to assume a working class girl couldn't read.

    In fact Emma got the nub of the book club question, she asked : 'Why?' and Usha couldn't really respond. Emma said she read a lot anyway, she already swapped books and discussed them with her Mum, so what was the point of sitting around in a room talking.about them with other people? And Usha just made some sort of noise that indicated Emma was obviously too dim to understand, because actually Usha hasn't a clue herself really what the point is of the book club.

    But I suspect I know. BBC TV is in the throws of promoting books and reading, which is very admirable, and this is the radio tie in, in exactly the same way TAs has tied in with National Fertility Week or whatever it was called, and many other information campaigns in the past. No wonder Usha sounded a bit unclear herself about why she was forming the book club, she probably hasn't yet been sent over the remit from Broadcasting House.



    .

     


    Morning Pollyannax I just wanted to say how much I agree with your post quoted above.
    I think the writing of Emma at the moment is hideous. Plus I know some posters like the new actress but I found the scene with Soosan unbelievable! She sounds like Tess (the accent) with the educational disadvantages of Lizzie Hexam. The old Emma sounded like Soosan, however, her grammar was much better when she spoke. Plus the old Emma sounded a lot sparkier and confident. Now she sounds like an uneducated idiot. It is wrong. They are dumbing down Emma to promote Nasty NIc.

    One of the funniest lines I remember from TA was when; Chris was going out with the posh Neesha and Emma turned up when she was leaving. Soosan was her usual snobby self. When they left Soosan told Emma off for appearing rude in her indifference. Emma's response was: I wasn't the one being rude.
    That was the old Emma, dislikeable to some maybe, but bright and quick, not this disaster.

    Apparently it is what they did to Hayley as well.

    Must goxx Back to the treadmill. I won't be able to come on the boards for a while, too much work. Have funxxxxx

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by pollyanna (U7304225) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    [She didn't say that she didn't like reading as such (It was the actual talking about the books she objected to. 'Too much like school'.
    Someone who aims for a more fulfilling career than being a cleaning lady all her life should perhaps consider that any kind of training would involve situations similar to school. I don't think that Emma would have any fun in Usha's Club but I thought Emma's dismissive attitude to a 'learning situation' remarkable[

    Emma said she swapped books with her Mum, Susan, not Clarrie.

    But I am bit confused. I love reading,; I have never resisted learning and regard it as a life long process. I have studied as an adult - I got my A levels, including Eng Lit - at night school as an adult.. But I too do not want to confuse my love of reading with 'a learning situation'' and I can totally empathise with Emma's suspicion that book group would be somewhere where some members would feel they had a better handle on the book, understood it better, and would need to impart this to the other members. That there would be a competitve edge to how well one could talk about the book.

    This might be a totally unfounded suspicion, but I can understand that Emma is happy to chat informally and without the structure of a book group with someone about the books she reads - in her case her Mum - in mine, friends and family members with whom I, like her, swap books - and I fhnnk that is fine and is not a reflection on the possibility or otherwise of Emma deciding to take up a formal education/trainging programme int he future.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by pollyanna (U7304225) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    And please excuse the many typos.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Nemo399 (U14258777) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Someone who aims for a more fulfilling career than being a cleaning lady all her life should perhaps consider that any kind of training would involve situations similar to school. I don't think that Emma would have any fun in Usha's Club but I thought Emma's dismissive attitude to a 'learning situation' remarkable.  

    I'm inclined to agree. It's very depressing, the way Emma's regressed recently, and it does seem to me (as with several other characters) that there's a distinct lack of continuity with the script writing. I don't really recognise the Emma who's on The Archers at the moment.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by maggiesaes (U2771771) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Maybe now she's regretting some of those decisions which have led her down this particular path and can see a life of very little other than other peoples dirty washing.

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by pollyanna (U7304225) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    [. I don't really recognise the Emma who's on The Archers at the moment.
    ]

    I agree wholeheartedly Nemo. They are rewriting Emma to make possible a jealousy./rivalry thing between her and the infuriating Nic, and its really annoying.

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Tadpole (U2267185) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    " I can totally empathise with Emma's suspicion that book group would be somewhere where some members would feel they had a better handle on the book, understood it better, and would need to impart this to the other members. That there would be a competitve edge to how well one could talk about the book. "

    I too share Emma's distaste/indifference towards the book group idea, and I did an Eng Lit degree.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by littleolga (U14608316) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Emma changed when the actress did, IMO. Felicity Jones was a bright and feisty Emma, Emerald O'Hanrahan is a whingeing dullard Emma.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by JudithL (U14272244) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    I went to a Book Club once and once only.
    I dutifully read the book, but I found that i was the only one who'd found it tedious, and I too didn't want to analyse it in a way reminiscent of Eng Lit.
    So after that experience, i wasn't tempted to buy another book that I wouldn't normally have read. I'm sorry to say it, but just the phrase "Booker prize short-listed book" puts me off it completely.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dairy Queen (U14314834) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    yes she can, I have seen her lips move as she is doing it

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by backsliding Pastrychef (U14565994) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    yes she can, I have seen her lips move as she is doing it  Where did you buy your radio? The picture on mine is really poor and I am looking to replace it.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Graham 42 (U6041479) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    As someone mentioned up thread, the BBC is doing some sort of book reading campaign thing pretty soon.

    This is the one and only reason why Ambridge suddenly has a book club, and it'll also explain why they will all suddenly forget about it in a months time and it'll never ever be mentioned again.

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Nemo399 (U14258777) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    If I was in charge of the 'Book Club' story line on The Archers, I'd have someone not thought to be of a literary disposition, ( perhaps Emma?) turning up at the Book Group, having raced through reading 'The Suspicions of Mr Whicher' in far less than three weeks, and then knocking spots off the likes of Usha, Lynda, Jennifer etc. in the course of the discussion by proving to be far more insightful/perceptive etc. than them, knocking them off their perch and forcing them to reassess their complacent 'educated' assumptions about said humble Amridge-ite!

    Sadly, I'm not going to be writing the script, so it will probably be poor old Mike Tucker (or equivalent) turning up and proving his ignorance yet again, with "hilarious" consequences.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    < But I suspect I know. BBC TV is in the throws of promoting books and reading, which is very admirable, and this is the radio tie in, in exactly the same way TAs has tied in with National Fertility Week or whatever it was called, and many other information campaigns in the past. No wonder Usha sounded a bit unclear herself about why she was forming the book club, she probably hasn't yet been sent over the remit from Broadcasting House. >

    exactly Polly and the Book Club will go the way of all the crazes in the enclave...

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Agreed again, Polly. I wouldn't want to join a book club either and I can read ....

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Jon Dylon (U2323379) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    I think she can read if she follows the words with her finger, but I doubt I'd be interested in her opinion on a book

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Vicky S (U2258400) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    but I doubt I'd be interested in her opinion on a book 

    Don't let it keep you up nights John, I expect the feeling's mutual. Any way, Emma's got a busy life to lead.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by irene (U14262395) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    i am taking heart from the fact that the first book is to be 'suspicions of mr. whicher. its about a real life victorian child murder. clutching at cheesestraws i know, but a girls gotta have hope, that its an omen.. ps it also coming up this year as bbc drama i imagine this could be some sort of tie in.?

    Report message50

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