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"So what if Phoebe has a few days out from school,"

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by mountetna2 (U14443003) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    says Lillian... 'what's the problem>'
    No problem for wealthy parasites like you and Kate Bank of Brian Madikane-Aldridge who don't NEED to do a hand's turn of earned work! But there might, just, be teeny TEENY problems for Phoebe if she gets the idea from Kate that education and qualifications are a 'boring' waste of time and lands on the unemployment scrap-heap!

    Rant over! (I'm afraid I enjoyed every minute of it - the sort of thing that keeps me listening!)

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Lilians twin (U4487710) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    No need for her to fly on same plane as Kate - if Kate's term dates are different Phoebe can travel separately. She's old enough. Or she could wait until the summer hols and stay for a longer visit. Ridiculous to try to cram the trip into relatively short Easter hols.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by mountetna2 (U14443003) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    Sorry, that should have been 'earning work' or 'work for a wage/salary' - got a bit carried away with the pyroclastic flow aimed a wealthy parasites. Not that they'd notice, too thick-skinned!

    It does look btw as if Brian's going to cough up - AGAIN! Why doesn't he tell Katred to save the money herself (and maybe have Phoebe to stay next Christmas or something rather than more or less instantly: it's about time Katiepoops learned a little about delayed gratification) - or go shares with the Tuckers? But that of course would mean Her Little Ladyship sitting down and consulting with oiks and peasants as equals and we can't have THAT!

    Another awful thought - if the Bank of Brine, in some supreme act of willpower, closes its doors to Her Ladyship, what's the betting she'll try the Bank of Lillian next door? I foresee the unfortunate Tuckers watching helplessly as Phoebe becomes more manipulative, more selfish, more pestering, more petulant - in short, more and more like her natural Mum - every day.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by mountetna2 (U14443003) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    PS where's Lucas in all this? Has he been consulted about having an extra kiddiwink foisted on him for a month? I bet he hasn't! I really would like to hear more of the Kate-Lucas relationship broadcast on air.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by thecynic (U14681398) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    Please keep ranting mountetna2, mind you I agree that this kind of stuff keeps me listening as well. I love the idea of the Bank of Brine - I think it already financed loans for laptops for Kate and Feebs. And when I say loans, I mean handouts...

    Vile, horrid Kate; I was convinced that there was something 'odd' going on between her and Lucas before Christmas. Let's hope that she has been deceiving everyone like the wicked, manipulative rascal that she is.
    (By heaven, I wish I could swear on these MBs...)

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Scarlett the Harlot (U14540168) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    That is a fair point Lilians twin BUT it is a 13 hour flight which is pretty long haul for a 12 year old travelling on her own.

    I agree and indeed have made the point in regard to the summer holidays.

    The air fare is around £550 and the travel time is 13 hours each way so it makes economic sense to go for a month or so in the summer holidays.

    Hopefully the Bank of Brine will make this a condition of forking out for the airfare.

    I don't think Brine is very impressed with Kate - he clearly wants to keep Roy and Hayley on side.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by AQSAM (U14549940) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    I think you get threatended with prison or a huge fine if you dare to remove your children from school, hey ho Bria will pay.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Brian-of-Britain (U14738525) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    Blimy mountetne2,

    how far is poyroclastic above pyroplasic in flow terms?

    She canna take it nay more captain I think shes gonna blow!

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by flamey nell (U14740877) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    pyroclastic . . .
    I'll make it my job to bring that into a sentence by the end of this week. What a lovely word.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Lilians twin (U4487710) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    She'll be 13 in June Scarlett which is the age I was the first time I flew - had never flown before and went unaccompanied. I remember feeling perfectly confident alone - though as far as I was concerned I had been an adult since age 3 (or younger) - but shorter. Admittedly this wasn't a 13 hour flight - I don't think planes could get that far without re-fuelling stops in those days.

    BA appear to leave it to parents to decide whether their offspring are responsible enough not to need nannying while travelling.

    www.britishairways.c...
    All children travelling alone, between the ages of 5 and 12 years old must be booked with the Skyflyer Solo service.
    Children between their 12th and 18th birthdays requesting assistance can also be registered as unaccompanied minors by following the same booking process.

    Lil's twin

    PS Only thing that worried me during my first flight was that I wasn't provided with a parachute. I blame Biggles.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Now Locking for a house (U3261819) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    I would think the Easter school holidays would coincide with those of Yooni. I will have to google.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Now Locking for a house (U3261819) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    Mountetna. Why on earth wouldn't someone as wealthy as Brian give his daughter £500. This amount would be nothing for him. He takes no holidays himself, ensures his wife and youngest child have none. He appears to spend very little. What exactly is his money for? He can't take it with him. Actually this applies to everyone in TA. They go nowhere, do nothing and don't appear to spend much. They just work. What for?

    Well, Dave is about to fork out for a car for Pip.... but that's it...

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    I'm sure Brine and JD go skiing at least twice a year and spend some time somewhere hot. It just never gets mentioned.

    And surely even the lower orders go to Spain? My staff do, and they are certainly not well paid!


    Incidentally there is no such thing as "pyroplastic"; just "thermoplastic" which melts on heat, as distinct from "thermosetting" which doesn't.

    Pyroclastic, OTOH, is the central heating system at Pompei, involving red hot broken rock.

    To an Icon, anything -clastic is pretty frightening.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by AP (U14268795) on Thursday, 10th February 2011

    I think, if I were Roy and Halely I would have approached the school and asked their opinion. Phoebe will be caught up with exams soon and I would have though that if her school work / homework is going well there would not be much objection to an extra week off. If needs be Kate could delay her departure to travel with Phoebe.

    If I was Brian I would not have funded the trip, on the other hand he did not hear Kate explaining to Roy that he was only concerned with the money.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Do Kate/Brine pay anything towards Feeble's upkeep?

    If not, why not?

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by mountetna2 (U14443003) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    how far is poyroclastic above pyroplasic in flow terms?

    She canna take it nay more captain I think shes gonna blow 

    And: 'I canna change the laws of volcanology!'

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by mountetna2 (U14443003) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Incidentally there is no such thing as "pyroplastic"; just "thermoplastic" which melts on heat, as distinct from "thermosetting" which doesn't.
     

    Sorry, I meant 'pyroclastic' - in my state of extreme irritation with all things wealthy and parasitic I hit the 'P' key twice instead of 'C' then 'P'!

    When IS that appalling female (Kate) going to get her comeuppance? Come on, Peggy, your country needs you!

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    ...but Spock can change the laws of Vulcanology?

    Returning briefly to the OP, if that is permitted, it really can matter little if a 12yo extends the Easter break.

    My son's break is being extended by a day so that the teachers do not have to be trained during their extensive holidays. So it clearly cannot be that critical.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    < Why on earth wouldn't someone as wealthy as Brian give his daughter £500.>

    And why should he? She is an adult and should take responsibility for her own children.
    It is because Brian always puts his hand in his wallet rather than have to face any difficulties that Kate is such a spoiled brat who has never been self supporting.

    Just because one is rich doesn't mean one should spoil children.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by vanity fair (U2597438) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Do Kate/Brine pay anything towards Feeble's upkeep?

    If not, why not?  


    Why would they? They're her grandparents not her parents. Their daughter abandoned her and left her with the natural father and his family.

    And on that point why doesn't anyone say to the vile Kate:

    "look, love you abandoned Phoebe now you're going a good way to abandoning the two kiddies in SA. You get very little say in anything - now bu**er off until you've learnt how those with responsibilities should behave".

    Peggy's the only one who came near it J and B just call her "darling" and indulge her all the time.

    vf

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Thursday Next (U2257911) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Kate isn't, she is the mother. It would be very interesting to know if she contributed to Phoebe's upkeep.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    <
    "look, love you abandoned Phoebe now you're going a good way to abandoning the two kiddies in SA. You get very little say in anything - now bu**er off until you've learnt how those with responsibilities should behave". >

    Wouldn't that be great, VF? Can't see it happening though...

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Kate has not abandoned her SA kids, she has gone abroad for a time, to work or study, as many parents do.

    And what could be more natural than a child getting a treat from a grandparent?

    Kate is the only B&J child NOT living off the family estate full time.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Scarlett the Harlot (U14540168) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Rollocks Icon

    Kate has abandoned her two SA children for almost a WHOLE YEAR

    A "treat" from a grandparent equates to a day out or a nice outfit for Christmas. It does not equate to £300 plus for Christmas and a return trip to South Africa for £550!

    Debbie and Adam may work for Brian but they EARN their money by working bloody hard.

    Alice got a cottage (as did Kate) and as far as we know they BOTH get or in Alice's case got as she and Chris now live in the cottage the income from letting the cottages out.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Dragonfly (U2223700) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Adam and Debbie aren't exactly lazing around peeling grapes! They work full-time. Debbie is in any case not mainly employed by Home Farm, she works for the consortium in which Brian is an investor.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by backsliding Pastrychef (U14565994) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    All the others work. Even Alice who is a student has held down a job, and given her grades seems to be a good student.
    Kate is a parasite. By giving Feebs ridiculously expensive presents for no obvious reason she is being trained up as a parasite too.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Scarlett - try not to let your fury get the better of the facts about darling Kate! The University year runs from October to May, so is only 8 months to start with. And she is returning for two month long breaks during it. So the absence is half a year, split into three chunks.

    And the children have not been abandoned. They are with their loving father and family. And in regular contact with Kate.

    Many people seem not to realise that Kate has arranged for the income from "her" cottage to be paid over to Roy to help with Feebee's upkeep.

    In SA, Kate's husband thinks it inappropriate for his wife to work, as he is a traditional African head of the family.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Now Locking for a house (U3261819) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    I'm wondering why Kate is the only spoiled brat of Brian's children.Of course Brian is the other one in the family o I assume Kate is the one that most takes after him.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by granny-em (U14672671) on Friday, 11th February 2011

    Oh, for goodness sake, school isn't the be all and end all of education. Travelling to S.A could be a valuable experience for Feebs, a child bought up in a small rural community. An enlightened teacher could even set her a holiday project, Feebs could use her lap top to research it.


    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by anna kist (U2314477) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Kate was the baby of the family and Brian's only child for 11 years that is why she is a spoiled brat.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by flamey nell (U14740877) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    You can take a child out of school for the odd trip, (like they arrange french exchanges etc as the children benefit from them), whereas ski trips are held in school holidays, because they are holidays; it's a skill but it's a fun trip. That makes logical sense to me.

    Yes, I'm sure it would be a nice trip for feebs, but the hint is in the name "school holidays" . . . she's got 6 or so weeks in the summer, and could make it a proper well organised trip with things arranged for her in SA instead of rushing to buy a flight to squeeze into the easter holidays. Everything for pheobe always done on a whim.

    As a teacher I get annoyed when asked to set extra work in advance for kids who are being taken on trips during school time, tho i'm quite happy to set it for children who are sick and at home; children GET school holidays; it's easy as you get the dates a year or two in advance and can plan around it. I've got more respect for a family that officially withdrew their children for 8 months, armed themselves with the curriculum, home-schooled whilst travelling and kids came back at same level as classmates, plus had the added experience of having camped their way round northern europe. No extra work for teachers, and great experience for all.

    There is just this expectation that it's your "right" to take kids out of school during term time. Are these the kind of people that turn into employees that call in sick when hungover? turn up hours late without calling in?

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Ruralrambler (U11117592) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    My nieces used to regularly fly unaccompanied to and fro from Hong Kong for school, from age 11 onwards. We used to meet them at Victoria Station in London, have them overnight and then put them on the train to school in Suffolk - all very Hogwarts, looking back! The airline (then British Caledonian, in the 80's) provided escort to Victoria and provided chaperoning at airport and on flight for the younger ones.

    No reason why Phoebe shouldn't do it safely, though as she has not travelled beyond Felpersham she might find it a bit daunting (although I suspect children are less nervous than the adults in these situations). But the point is that Kate has never properly consulted Roy or Hayley or taken their views into account - no surprise there of course.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    More children than I care to think have taken time of either side of my current Feb holiday (ohhh teachers do get lots of holidays)

    They are off skiing etc... one told me they were off to the Dominican republic because this time of year is not hurricane season (oh I am jealous). The school seems to be reasonable and let them go.

    I would say visiting half siblings with her mother is probably more justifiable than that and phoebe is not in a certificate year.

    I don't know time off school should be encouraged but equally I am not sure that schools should be completely inflexible around it

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    An interesting post Nell, especially your story about the family who went off for eight months. I know people who did that and the children missed out on nothing and gained hugely from the experience.

    There is one bit in your post that I'd like you to clarify -

    'whereas ski trips are held in school holidays, because they are holidays; it's a skill but it's a fun trip. '

    Is this a school trip? If so, then I'm gobsmacked. You mean you can actually get teachers to work in their holidays? And are they compensated financially?

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Ruralrambler (U11117592) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Agree, ruralsnowflake - nice to hear a bit of balance on this after all the shock horror of missing a few days of school!

    Not that I support Kate.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by flamey nell (U14740877) on Saturday, 12th February 2011


    I'm surprised at your surprise PollyGlot. . . I thought all schools did it that way? But then i'm only thinking about the 3 i know, and the schools around here, so realise that's quite limited.

    The kids go off to their ski schools for half days, teachers get to ski themselves, sometimes teachers took partners, and when kids were older, were allowed to bring their own children once they were old enough to ski at same ski school. They weren't paid to go on the holiday, but it didn't cost them anything, and partners/family got discounted places. I think they always took one extra teacher/adult too, to make sure they got the odd evening / afternoon session off. I imagine it was the parents paying for that extra teacher within the price of the holiday.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    I think teachers taking children skiing are very brave. As anyone who has skied will know, once you are off the nursery slopes it is inevitable that people will get lost; finish up in the wrong valley, etc.

    But not all parents will understand this!

    And I presume the teachers involved may be only moderately good skiers themselves!

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Well Nell, I haven't lived in England for many a long year and schools have changed and are changing.

    What you say is stiil surprising. The point is that although it might be fun taking a bunch of children on a hoilday is still work!! That's why it should be done during term time.

    A friend of mine was teaching for a couple of years in England and was asked to take a group of students on a trip abroad for a week. She was quite keen, until she discovered that it would be during the holidays and she would be expected to contribute towards the cost. She declined. As she pointed out, 'I worked as a tour guide for five years and it was bluddy hard work. But people seem to think it's all fun and frolicking.'

    If she'd gone she wouldn't have been able to afford a holiday of her own. And to spend your own holiday working and paying for the prilvilege because others don't appreciate what you do seems a bit off.

    .

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Polly - Rather ask why teachers should have such vast paid holidays. No-one else does. I think they should be willing to spend a week or two of them doing some work. Training days for example.

    As to contributing towards the cost - depends how much free time they will have. And, perhaps, on the ability of the parents to pay for them.

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by PollyGlot (U4652497) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Icon - It might be a better question to ask why there are fewer holidays in the UK than in Europe.

    As for teaching - from what I've heard it seems to me that UK teachers don't really have a great deal of free time - marking , planning and useless paperwork taking up evenings, weekends and some parts of their holidays. And the holidays of course have to be taken during the most expensive season.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Dragonfly (U2223700) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    When teachers take school parties abroad I think they usually travel free. The price charged to pupils is set to allow for that, either by the travel company or the school. It is work but when it's related to the subject they teach, e.g. Classics, Geography, I think teachers regard it one of the most rewarding things they do.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by acebass (U3133653) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    It is indeed rewarding, but also one of the most mind-numbingly exhausting things I have ever done. You are on the job, non-stop, no let up. I frequently get home from these "jaunts" & weep with tiredness.
    And still I do it. And pay my way. We always use the fr ee place provided by the travel company to subsidise the less fortunate kids

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by ruralsnowflakebliss (U8131914) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Taking children away is indeed exhausting. We have an expedition week at the beginning of June and four trips all for S3 go out on that week. Some abroad some not. I enjoy it but oh you get tired. If your are a half way reliable teacher you barely sleep: just an uneasy doze. Yes we take turns to prowl around and are constantly monitoring. Take one bunch of hyper excited teens and have the misfortune to mix them with another school and you can see why. That said I know from experience that trips are often one of the most memorable things about school.

    The skiing trip goes out across this Feb break and yes the teachers are skiing but also working.

    The cost of my meals and accommodation are built into the trip. I am not sure about an expensive one like skiing. Generally the companies used offer one free adult place for every two children going. They do the costings.

    Our school also has a trust fund to help those who need it with the cost of a trip for their child. We also subsidise gradual payment schemes

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Organoleptic Icon (U11219171) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Good for you acebass - you are the sort of teacher we need. Might I ask what age/type of school?

    Ditto snowflake - though if 1 for 2 priced in the trip MUST be 50% overpriced?

    What do you do about skiing if you lose someone?

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Now Locking for a house (U3261819) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Oh yes rural, my daughter had problems at school but she was the happiest she has ever been I think on a school trip on a barge when she was 10 years old... It gave her such confidence and she came back to be the goal shooter in the netball team. She did not shine at academic work and it was great she could excell at sport. It was all downhill a couple of years after that..... It's rather sad to think that's the happiest time she ever had.... I do hope she has others as good. I am eternally grateful that she had that perfect time..... Unfortunately school meant and did nothing to and for her but that trip did....

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by AP (U14268795) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Secondly teachers are so brave, it must be gruelling, but my children got a great deal out of all their school , and loved the ski trips.

    As a primary teacher I loved taking groups away. You got to see another side of your class, some pupils, who usually sank to the back, shone. The physical challenges enabled some to excel, some showed an unexpected compassionate side, others a vulnerability. With this age you could keep a very close eye on them, although sleep was always a problem!

    As a cub leader, camping near the cubs' home village, my fear was always that one would be overcome with homesicknesses and go home in the middle of the night. No one ever did, although there were some close calls.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by flamey nell (U14740877) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    Locki, sorry your daughter isn't in a good place now - i do think that schools can make or break kids, and it's actually quite a fine line.

    Trips really do give you memories that stick in your mind forever. i was allowed on music tours cos they were subsidised as we normally incorporated part of trip going to our twin town (in the days when councils had money to promote such things!). Same kind of excitement as school trips though. I have a head full of memories just from the bus journey, as well as breathtaking scenery of switzerland / germany / paris / berlin (before the wall came down!). Of course the bus trip didn't include watching dvds, playing nintendos or anything other than chatting and playing cards. It's incredible considering my mum had no money. I know i'm going off point, but honestly, my mum had no extra money for anything, but we had free instrument tuition for years, subsidised music tours (concerts in various locations throughout the trip) and had the times of our lives (3 siblings too). i can't imagine any family in the same position these days getting such opportunities.

    My trips as a teacher have always been single sex (boys school), usually hotel to ourselves, kids taken skiing only by experienced insured ski school, afternoon for other organised activities which teachers supervised (swimming in hotel pool, mini golf, sledging etc.). Letting kids go by themselves on to the slopes . . .i have no idea these days about insurance, but there was a fatality in a neighbouring school the same week as our trip when teachers were supervising some activity. As a result oru school had to go through health-and-safety checks with fine toothcomb and realised it was already so tight no changes needed to be made. But that comes from the same team going year after year. they know the issues, know the locations, know the procedures, same teachers go, yes it's exhausting, but as they're all friends, it's almost a perk of the job. If only that trip on the bus wasn't part of it . . . just that alone put me off once i turned 30.

    Also, the other deal is taking younger children. Taking kids old enough to drink is a big no no. One year there were two (i guess over 16 to drink in austria?), and they were the most sensible of kids and were only allowed to drink in the hotel and were allowed to stay up a little later than the youngsters (12 - 14 most of them). and they were all enjoying pillow fights, rather than anything saucy in the local night clubs - so much easier to deal with.

    I did one trip with 6th formers - mixed group to barcelona on some psuedo business studies trip (i was doing a colleague a favour in going) - i honestly thought i'd come home without a job or without a pupil or two. it's all down to the teacher/teachers in charge. all the teachers on that trip vowed never to go with mr x again.

    Apologies for waffling to long . . . i got carrried away with the memories.

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Now Locking for a house (U3261819) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    I was also carried away with memories flamey nell! Funnily enough my daughter rang me just after I made that post. I told her about it and her joy if recollection was immediate and spontaneous... We go to remembering then..... We can't let ourselves remember a great deal......

    However, she is in now a better place than she has been over the years. I think we ll need more happiness in life.....

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Now Locking for a house (U3261819) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    oh my, my typos mean my posts get more and more like an 'allo allo' script. having another cup of tea, needed one after memories, so no capitals here.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by joe (U13868420) on Saturday, 12th February 2011

    marking, planning and useless paperwork taking up evenings, weekends and some parts of their holidays  Don't get me started…

    I find those who whine the most about the amount of time off (they think) teachers get are invariably in comfortable 9-5 jobs they can just switch off when they leave.

    Report message50

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