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You are here > 606 message boards > International > Klinsmann plays down USA claims

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Klinsmann plays down USA claims

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Message 1 - posted by stuart_host (U4533466) , Jul 7, 2006

Germany coach Jurgen Klinsmann pleaded not to be put under pressure to decide his future - as he played down claims he is a target for the United States.

news.bbc.co.uk/sport...

Would Klinsmann make a good US coach seeing as he lives there already? Could he turn the super-power of a nation into a super-power of football?
       

Message 2 - posted by moorcat17 (U2495368) , Jul 7, 2006

There are many people on the American side who acknowledge that Bruce Arena took us from the footballing wilderness of 10 years past to at least respectability today, and that in order to move to the next level, we simply don't have the expertise stateside to do it.

It is rumored that the USSF is finally ready to open their checkbooks to get a proper manager in, and Klinsmann is the obvious choice since he lives 20 minutes from the US training facilities in California and is very familiar with the US program (he's been with Arena on the sidelines in training several times).

There are many US fans who would definitely not be upset if we managed to pry him away from Germany.

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Message 3 - posted by FA (U4675579) , Jul 7, 2006

It would be wonderful if they could get Klinsman or any highly regarded coach from abroad. Arena did well for the US side. But american football/soccer needs a change of direction. I think the biggest problem with US as a footballing nation is that we leave the development of our youth talent to the amateurs. Collegiate soccer is actually a huge detriment to the development of American footballers. We need a system where the players are playing for club teams as schoolboys on up just like they do in europe or south america.

I personally would prefer it if the US took hiddink, but if not hiddink I think Klinsman would be a great fit.

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Message 4 - posted by Xavier (U3752331) , Jul 7, 2006

Dive dive dive! biggrin


Klinsmann would bring something extra to the US set-up with all his experience and knowledge. We don't really know how good he is as a coach yet. I believe many German fans weren't so happy with him in the run-up to the World Cup. I doubt he could turn the US into a football superpower as it's not ingrained in their sports culture as it is in Europe but he may do a good job in the short to medium term.

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Message 5 - posted by releesethehounds (U3931664) , Jul 7, 2006

Klinsmann is too inexperienced, yes he has all these fancy qualifications and US coaching methods but I think his PERSONAL effect on the German team was not that important. They're playing well because German sides are always self-motivated and play with discipline, whoever coaches them. Plus the team is playing on home soil.

To be fair to Klinsi he did not have a great squad to pick from (apart from a few class players) so from that perspective he's done well.

The Yanks shouldve gone for an experienced coach like Hiddink who seems to play to the national strengths of the sides he coaches. It's all well and good thrashing the likes of Costa Rica and Honduras in qualifying but they need a coach who can prepare them for tougher matches at WC level.

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Message 6 - posted by Scott (U3346753) , Jul 7, 2006

I'd love to see anybody with the courage to start 2 attacking forwards...Arena was waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too conservative in this world cup.

Arena was also too enamored with the players from 2002 world cup team...In the end, his reliance on Claudio Reyna, Eddie Pope, Pablo Mastroeni, DaMarcus Beasley, Eddie Lewis and Brian McBride cost him...He had other options in Convey, Eddie Johnson, Clint Dempsey, Brian Ching, Chris Albright and Jimmie Conrad.

Arena's biggest crime might be losing Freddie Adu to Ghana who should Have been included on the squad. After watching Ghana qualify for the 2nd round, Adu is said to be considering joining them now.

Time to move on for the US...They'll probably never be a football power, but they should be able to qualify for the 2nd round and make the quarterfinals or semifinals once in awhile.

In my opinion, the best thing that could happen for the US team is if CONCACAF were to merge with the South American teams. Playing in Copa America wouldn't hurt either.

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Message 7 - posted by moorcat17 (U2495368) , Jul 7, 2006

I sure as hell am not going to defend Arena here as he is candidate for biggest moron of the cup, but I will nitpick.

-Convey, Beasley, and Lewis all started on the left wing and all 3 sucked, period.

-Mastroeni was the best player on the field for either team in the Italy match till he lost his head.

-Albright had no business being on the squad.

-Conrad played 1.5 games out of 3.

-Ching is uselss as well, but probably should have played against Ghana.

-Reyna was the only reason we didn't lose the first match 10-0, even though it's his fault we conceded the 2nd. Reyna was useless against Ghana though.

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Message 8 - posted by Butterfly Effect (U4718622) , Jul 7, 2006

Message posted by releesethehounds
Klinsmann is too inexperienced, yes he has all these fancy qualifications and US coaching methods but I think his PERSONAL effect on the German team was not that important.

Quoted from this message




Klinsmann criticised German football for being too slow and not attacking enough. He selected players from clubs with a reputation for quite positive football, and gave all his squad extra training drills. He created an environment for the national team in which the squad would feel they were an elite, and told the players it was up to them to earn the chance of being part of that elite (or not).

Have you seen what the German team was like in the last European Championship? Those performances will smash your arguments to smithereens and show you what a difference Klinsmann has made.

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Message 9 - posted by furiousbigfoot (U3882598) , Jul 7, 2006

My sense of the US team is that it has been a little bit of a closed club for some while now and while Arena was a new broom when he came in he now has his own posse of guys and it may be time for some house cleaning. I also know from living in the US that the concept of a National team is still a little odd for Americans. They remain confused at the concept on a visceral level and often have to have it explained in terms of an "All Star" team. Few other sports have a permament national coach; guys get picked to run a team for a tournament like the Olympics and then they are done. Certainly there is nothn glike the "interest" in the NAtional Coach that is seen in England. Accordingly I see no tears shed when the US loses at anything (unlike in the rest of the world) that comes with having some kind of emotional investment in a National team.

A change is needed in the way the team is run and as we have seen Klinsmann is more than capable of being a change agent; fancy, making the team of Lothar Matthaus and Rudi Voller fun to watch! If the Germans let him go though I'll be very surprised. His short reign to date has seemed like nothing less than a revolution of sorts, affecting not only the football team but German Society as a whole; and for the better. If the Germans are smart they'll buy and old Concorde and make it his personal transport to let him jet to and fro. He earns less than Erickson did so there has to be room in the budget.

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Message 10, Jul 7, 2006

This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

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Message 11 - posted by sabian713 (U4628103) , Jul 7, 2006

klinsmann would be perfect for the US if he was interested. i personally would prefer a domestic coach but im yet to find one with klinsmanns level of expertise. bob bradley is in my opinion the best american coach around but i dont see him leading our team to new levels on the world stage. klinsmanns offensive background may be a help to us as well seeing as we only scored one goal in this world cup.i think its safe to blame arena for blowing it this year so i would be more than happy to hire klinsmann.

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Message 12 - posted by izzo_milan (U4372674) , Jul 7, 2006

Wish I could co-sign post number 10. What I can say, though, is that this fan who lives and dies with the US National team would be thrilled to have a coach who's always been a winner at the highest level, for both club and country. Arena has done wonders for the team, but 8 years is a long time to work with the same group of players and after a while small flaws become aggravated. Even before his tenure as coach of Germany Klinsmann showed an affinity for and interest in US soccer--a belief in our side, coupled with the experience and attitude of a winner, is what we need to reach the next level.

On a technical level, a committment to playing offensive-minded soccer would present a welcome change from the timid and ultimately ineffective lineups we had recently in Germany.

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Message 13 - posted by FA (U4675579) , Jul 7, 2006

I tend to agree with the brit in Delaware, if Arena had been the coach of a national team for a nation that cared about football there would be a media crisis right now after the disappointing US performance. Yes many americans like soccer and support the national team, but most of them prior to the world cup would have been hard pressed to name two players on the team. But im optimistic, in this world cup I felt more passion and interest for the game then even 94 when the USA hosted the cup. This passion is important, it is what creates gifted footballers, at a park near my house I saw two boys kicking a ball around and one was saying "Im ronaldo". This may sound like a small thing but it isn't, until american school kids decide to pick up a ball and emulate Zidane or whoever their favorite great is, we will never have a team with sufficient technical ability. You need to play football on the street to develop technical ability it can rarely be taught.

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Message 14 - posted by miamiheatchamp (U4624918) , Jul 7, 2006

I'd like Klinnsmann as coach, but am kind of leery to having a non-American as head coach of the national team. After viewing all the protest to Sven's tenure in England, I'd think it would be a distraction and too easy of an alibi if things went wrong.I could only hear it now..... " oh, we didn't win the World Cup by 7 goals, LET'S LYNCH THE HESSIAN!!"
I like his style of play though, and his training methods are mainly derived from American coaches and American football. The U.S. coaching style is much more tough and stringent than thier European counterparts, with an emphasis on endurance and mental toughness. An American coach will not think twice to letting any player 'have it', and drive them hard. Though technical coaching in Europe and elsewhere is by far superior to anything we have in the States, the smart European sides will see the benefit of such strenous and tough training, an include it to thier training regiment.

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Message 15 - posted by izzo_milan (U4372674) , Jul 7, 2006

I'm sorry, socalfootiefan, but you simply don't know what you're talking about. You may live in the US, but you still buy into the ignorant stereotype that Americans neither care about nor understand soccer. I understand how easy and convenient it is for Europeans to drink that kool-aid. But open your mind a bit.

We're a gigantic country, and it's true that soccer is a minority sport, but that doesn't mean that we don't have many, many thousands of fans who not only know the rules, zealously follow the national team, but who also--gasp!--know player names and debate roster selections and lineups.

Interestingly, it was the European media who made dozens of glaring errors when reporting on our national team players for the world cup. They simply couldn't be bothered to learn who was on our team.

"most [american soccer fans] would have been hard pressed to name two players on the team."
-------
Again, give it a rest. You don't know what you're talking about, you're not a real fan, and that's ok. But you can keep your ignorant and, quite frankly, offensive comments to yourself. Some of us actually want to discuss this question, not dabble in tired and hackneyed "americans don't know soccer" debates.

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Message 16 - posted by roakey (U3990235) , Jul 7, 2006

klingsman will be a good asset to u amercans


but the problem lies in your grass roots-

a good coach is only half the issue

as england know though you do need a good coach

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Message 17 - posted by Aarfy_Aardvark - bring back 606 (U2172035) , Jul 8, 2006

This is basically one step further for him getting his American citizenship I would imagine.



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Message 18 - posted by dave (U4324202) , Jul 8, 2006

Klinsmann would be ideal but would the Kaiser allow it?

also i'm perplexed why Freddy Adu was never selected for the USA?

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Message 19 - posted by MentosThePlaymaker (U4474746) , Jul 8, 2006

I think he would be able to improve the team performances but what the US needs is more players at youth level so they have more talent to tap on.

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Message 20 - posted by izzo_milan (U4372674) , Jul 8, 2006

To dave,

The question is, would the German public allow it?! Folks over there seem pretty intent on keeping Klinsi around at least for Euro 2008.

As for Freddy, keep in mind that he's still very, very young. Not even 17 years old yet, I don't think. He's getting regular playing time for one of our teams in MLS, and he's all but assured of a move to La Liga or the Premiership (Chelsea?) when he's 18. Further, he only has 1 cap for the national team--he came on in like the 80th minute for a friendly against Canada. In short, he still has a little bit of physical and mental growing up to do before he's a regular for the US. But expect him to feature in more and more matches for us in the coming 18 months, before he moves on to a high profile club.

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