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Discussion:

Should Hunt Monitors be arrested?

Messages  1 - 15 of 15

 
 
 

Message 1 - posted by Crusader, Mar 29, 2008

With the laws on 'stalking' people, shouldn't the so-called Hunt Monitors be arrested? They are now hiding in bushes and spying on people engaged in legal activities such as trail hunting. This seems remarkably unfair and likely to cause trouble. Shouldnt the 'monitors' be arrested and, if they are unable to prove a case against the particular hunt they are spying on, then they themselves should go to jail.
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Message 2 - posted by U4357578, Mar 29, 2008

I believe that the number of hunt monitors jailed for their activities should exactly mirror the number of huntsmen jailed for their activities...
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Message 3 - posted by VeryTrue, Mar 29, 2008


This seems remarkably unfair

Quoted from this message


What is unfair about it?

Incidentally, one of the exceptions to the 1997 Protection from Harassment Act is that "stalking" is not illegal for the purposes of attempting to detect criminal activity. Even if no such activity were going on, the monitors could claim that they were simply looking out for it, so your case would fall flat on its face.
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Message 4 - posted by Crusader, Mar 30, 2008


This seems remarkably unfair

What is unfair about it?

Incidentally, one of the exceptions to the 1997 Protection from Harassment Act is that "stalking" is not illegal for the purposes of attempting to detect criminal activity. Even if no such activity were going on, the monitors could claim that they were simply looking out for it, so your case would fall flat on its face.

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OK, so it is fine for me to sit outside a hunt monitors house and follow him eachtime he drives his car. I may just catch him out breaking a traffic law one day?
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Message 5 - posted by VeryTrue, Mar 30, 2008

You could try it as a defence. However, I would imagine that the court would weigh up the credibility of your claim.

Hunt monitors are spending their time out in the woods spying on hunts, claiming to be checking on whether they are complying with the specific law against hunting. As such, they are not spying on an individual, and the group they are spying on are rather more likely to break this particular law than anyone else. Since no reasonable person would confuse this activity with stalking in the conventional sense of the word, I suspect that the court would accept that they were doing so for the purpose of attempting to detect criminal activity.

Watching an individual 24 hours a day, on the other hand, does sound a lot like stalking, and personally I think you would simply look ridiculous if you claimed to be doing so on the off chance that your victim might break traffic law, even though he is no more likely to do so than any other individual.
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Message 6 - posted by littleAdgeCutler, Mar 30, 2008

You could try it as a defence. However, I would imagine that the court would weigh up the credibility of your claim.

Hunt monitors are spending their time out in the woods spying on hunts, claiming to be checking on whether they are complying with the specific law against hunting. As such, they are not spying on an individual, and the group they are spying on are rather more likely to break this particular law than anyone else. Since no reasonable person would confuse this activity with stalking in the conventional sense of the word, I suspect that the court would accept that they were doing so for the purpose of attempting to detect criminal activity.

Watching an individual 24 hours a day, on the other hand, does sound a lot like stalking, and personally I think you would simply look ridiculous if you claimed to be doing so on the off chance that your victim might break traffic law, even though he is no more likely to do so than any other individual.

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What you say is generally true.

They seem to be increasing their activities to filming hunting people on non-hunting days.

They seem to be trying intimidate people.
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Message 7 - posted by on_a_pc_near_you, Mar 30, 2008

How could you possible intimidate someone who can cold-heartedly kill a fox..??



They seem to be increasing their activities to filming hunting people on non-hunting days.

They seem to be trying intimidate people.

Quoted from this message

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Message 8 - posted by littleAdgeCutler, Mar 30, 2008

How could you possible intimidate someone who can cold-heartedly kill a fox..??



They seem to be increasing their activities to filming hunting people on non-hunting days.

They seem to be trying intimidate people.

Quoted from this message



Someone who kills a fox is no different from someone who kills a chicken.

Both lawful activities.

They are filming people who go trail hunting when they are going about their normal working lives.

This is, i presume, an attempt at intimidation.

I didn't say it is going to work.

In fact, I think it is counter productive.

One spent a day filming my daughter last year. It nearly ended up counter productive for him.
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Message 9 - posted by U4357578, Mar 30, 2008

One spent a day filming my daughter last year. It nearly ended up counter productive for him.

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How so?
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Message 10 - posted by Slimtone, Mar 30, 2008


How so?

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Her image almost cracked the camera lens ! <laugh>
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Message 11 - posted by littleAdgeCutler, Mar 30, 2008

One spent a day filming my daughter last year. It nearly ended up counter productive for him.
How so?

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Her image cracked the camera lens.

Or something like that :-)
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Message 12 - posted by VeryTrue, Mar 30, 2008


They seem to be increasing their activities to filming hunting people on non-hunting days.

They seem to be trying intimidate people.

Quoted from this message


Well, that would certainly get them into the territory covered by the Protection from Harassment Act. However, that wasn't the original question raised in Message 1, which seemed a completely different and quite reasonable order of activity by "hunt monitors."
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Message 13 - posted by littleAdgeCutler, Mar 30, 2008


They seem to be increasing their activities to filming hunting people on non-hunting days.

They seem to be trying intimidate people.

Well, that would certainly get them into the territory covered by the Protection from Harassment Act. However, that wasn't the original question raised in Message 1, which seemed a completely different and quite reasonable order of activity by "hunt monitors."

Quoted from this message



You are right.

But I do not think it is reasonable.

I think vigilante groups are frowned upon in general.

Why not film black people in Edmonton? They MAY commit a crime.

If a member of the public started filming you because you were driving at 75 on a motorway, I bet you would be slightly annoyed.

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Message 14 - posted by VeryTrue, Mar 30, 2008

Possibly, but none of those activities would constitute stalking either, which was what the original question was about.
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Message 15 - posted by Bazza, Mar 31, 2008

Antisocial behavior should always be observed, and reported.
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