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Discussion:

Nightclub ejects disabled customer.

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Message 1 - posted by U3312314, Sep 21, 2007

Hush Enigma, in Newton Abbott refuses access to a disbled girl because she had to use crutches.

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/...

The manager claimed she had been told that she had the right to disregard the law banning this practice.

Should the club, Hush Enigma, be allowed to stay open, or should it be closed down and the manager arrested?

What do you think should happen?
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Message 2 - posted by CanveyCove, Sep 22, 2007

This is but the tip of the iceberg of ignorance and abuse of the rights of the disabled. The Disability Rights Act I'm afraid, despit all the fanfair and puff is yet another of New Labours badly (dare I think, deliberatly) drafted laws with more holes in it than a Swiss cheese. Is there a local disabled Access Group, tell them, they may have the right contacts to ensure the Night Club owner learns the error of his ways.
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Message 3 - posted by TheLocalYokel, Sep 22, 2007

Hey D_D, you sound like Jack Warner (later Dixon of Dock Green) in his WW II wireless programme, who would always finish, "What do you think, chums?" ;)

On the face of things, this seems appalling treatment of a young woman who already suffers major disadvantages in her life through no fault of her own.

Playing the devil's advocate, if a fight ensued and someone grabbed the woman's crutches and used them as weapon to seriously injure, or even kill, someone there would then be people criticising the night club for that.

It does seem unbelievable though that the club could not have arranged circumstances whereby the woman could have been admitted with her crutches to enjoy a night out.

If she still wants to go there let's hope 'both sides' can get together and a sensible solution worked out.

Good will and common sense are far better than instant fleeing to threats of litigation.
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Message 4 - posted by HipScarf, Sep 24, 2007



Playing the devil's advocate, if a fight ensued and someone grabbed the woman's crutches and used them as weapon to seriously injure, or even kill, someone there would then be people criticising the night club for that.


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Why? Clubs aren't criticised for selling drinks in glass containers that are frequently used as weapons in fights, are they?

This is ridiculous discrimination which has nothing to do with weapons and everything to do with only 'beautiful' people being allowed in. The crutches were a godsend of an excuse not to let a fat girl into the club.
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Message 5 - posted by witchymummy, Sep 24, 2007

That reminds me of the time that I was asked in front of a pool full of swimmers to leave because the staff thought I was contagious and even if not my appearance would offend other swimmers because my psoriasis (a form of eczema) had flared up!
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Message 6 - posted by HipScarf, Sep 24, 2007

That's disgraceful. I'd have complained all the way to the top on that one. How dare anyone comment on someone's personal appearance? Especially in public like that.
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Message 7 - posted by witchymummy, Sep 24, 2007

I did - but to no avail - Has to be said I didn't go swimming again for 12 years! The only people who ever make nasty comments about it are dim witted adults. I have never had horrid comments by children most of whom know what it is anyway.

The other people at the pool on that occassion also complained to the management but it had no effect.
That's disgraceful. I'd have complained all the way to the top on that one. How dare anyone comment on someone's personal appearance? Especially in public like that.

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Message 8 - posted by Bazza, Sep 24, 2007

You should speak to your GP, local councillor, and MP on this negative situation you have experienced.

You have every right to particpate in life as you wish, and ignorance should be challenged.
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Message 9 - posted by witchymummy, Sep 24, 2007

I would but it happens too often to worry about. I don't really think about what others think of me - I know that the people who are important to me accept me for who I am - anyone else can suffer in their ignorance.
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Message 10 - posted by Bazza, Sep 24, 2007

Great attitude, treat igorance with disdain.
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Message 11 - posted by witchymummy, Sep 24, 2007

I think you have to - I know I have brought Witchy boy up to accept everybody and not judge on what people look like, just a shame many adults still do.

Having had this condition since age 4 you do get used to it and it is not harming to the health it is just cosmetic so it would be mad to worry about something so minor when others have much worse to deal with.

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Message 12 - posted by Bazza, Sep 24, 2007

We are all one and when we start to label or reject anyone,we are isolating ourselves.
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Message 13 - posted by Tettie-Hat, Sep 24, 2007

Hush Enigma, in Newton Abbott refuses access to a disbled girl because she had to use crutches.

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/...

The manager claimed she had been told that she had the right to disregard the law banning this practice.

Quoted from this message

The club does not have a leg to stand on [no pun intended] as they are in breach of the Disability Discrimination Act 2005.
Since October 1999, service providers [**]have had to consider making reasonable adjustments to the way they deliver their services so that disabled people can use them. Making 'reasonable adjustments' means:

changing any practice, policy or procedure which makes it impossible or unreasonably difficult for disabled people to use a service (eg waiving a no dogs policy for blind customers accompanied by their guide dog)...


[**] Service providers include:
doctors' surgeries, shops, hotels, banks, pubs, clubs, theatres, hairdressers, places of worship, courts, and voluntary groups such as play groups. Non-educational activities provided by schools would also be included.

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Lets hope Jennifer Bartle is able to teach them a lesson or two about the law! ;)
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Message 14 - posted by Bazza, Sep 24, 2007

Where I live all public places, buildings and venues must have disabled access.

Access and attendence must be available to all patrons.

To do otherwise a penalty will be applied.
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Message 15 - posted by merak, Sep 24, 2007

She wasn't refused because was disabled. It wasn't even her being refused, it was her crutches. Had I gone down to the same club on crutches cause i'd broken a foot - which doesn't classify me as disabled - I'd have been refused as well.
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Message 16 - posted by HipScarf, Sep 24, 2007

That's still no defence. If someone needs crutches to be able to walk, they cannot be refused entry.
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Message 17 - posted by Tettie-Hat, Sep 24, 2007

She wasn't refused because was disabled. It wasn't even her being refused, it was her crutches. Had I gone down to the same club on crutches cause i'd broken a foot - which doesn't classify me as disabled - I'd have been refused as well.

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But why?

Jennifer Bartle was refused simply because she requires a walking aid for mobility. She is disabled - suffering from a bone disease.

The argument given may have been because the crutches might be used as a weapon. But would you honestly be able to fight anyone whilst you've got a broken leg? Similarly with Jennifer!

If argued someone else could use them as a weapon without your consent, the same could be said for any number of 'would-be weapon-like' objects; handbags, stiletto's, glasses, stools, tables, a wheelchair etc etc etc or ..... even the humble fist!

Had the girl got a reputation for being a troublemaker that is different but she hasn't, or that would have been the reason given for not letting her in the club.

To make matters worse, she had been allowed admittance in to this particular club on two previous occasions without any problems. So why penalise her this time, just because some nutter they MIGHT have already let in MIGHT start some trouble which MIGHT result in her crutches being used as a weapon!

Seems a shame to penalise her for anothers actions don't you think?


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Message 18 - posted by Two_man_bandit, Sep 24, 2007

Why the hell would a disabled person on crutches want to go to a nightclub anyway?

If I had a broken arm I might think twice about a round of golf or a tennis match??

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Message 19 - posted by patsy, Sep 24, 2007

Two_man_bandit,

Why not?
Shouldn't a person on crutches be able to go out in the evening like anyone else does. <erm>


Why the hell would a disabled person on crutches want to go to a nightclub anyway?

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Message 20 - posted by Tettie-Hat, Sep 24, 2007

Haven't you heard, Patsy? Disabled people aren't allowed to have a social life ;)

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This discussion is tagged with:
- Devon
- disability
- disability rights

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