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Discussion:

FAT KIDS!!!

Messages  1 - 20 of 53

 
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Message 1 - posted by View from the Armchair, Feb 26, 2007

Have you seen this kid in the papers today? ...8 years old and 14 stone!!!

www.thesun.co.uk/art...

Some are saying this is child abuse ...what d'ya think?
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Message 2 - posted by U7487816, Feb 26, 2007

From the Sun
He is THREE TIMES the weight of a healthy child his age and has broken four beds, five bikes and six toilet seats due to his bulk.

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I'm about 19 stones and I've managed to never break one toilet seat, let alone six.. <laugh>
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Message 3 - posted by Junk2Rubbish, Feb 26, 2007

He's shed 20lb in six weeks.

So let's just say
"well done lad, keep up the good work"

and hope the socials leave a loving mum and son alone.

Education is what's required, not threats.
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Message 4 - posted by asianboyleeds, Feb 26, 2007

death by chocolate

at least it'd be the best way to go :D
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Message 5 - posted by bigfatprodigalson, Feb 26, 2007

fatter the better in my book - means that I am always first to the sweet trolley - so long as the route is not too narrow - otherwise cannot squeeze past
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Message 6 - posted by asianboyleeds, Feb 26, 2007

and just think of the money ya save on heating bills in the winter, all that natural insulation :P
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Message 7 - posted by bigfatprodigalson, Feb 26, 2007

Once went to a works barbeque that cost 25 per head and was 10 mins late - by the time got served all the fat boys had been up for seconds and all I got was a baked potato - I mean 25 for a potato.

I will bear a grudge until my last breath
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Message 8 - posted by Danmouth, Feb 26, 2007

LOL fatty broke the toilet seat! <laugh>
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Message 9 - posted by thedukeofhunslet, Feb 26, 2007

Q. What do you get with a happy meal?
A. Cancer.

Can someone tell me is five feet tall normal for an eight year old? Or perhaps the poor mite's problem is glandular.
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Message 10 - posted by Danmouth, Feb 26, 2007

Jesus man, you're about as funny as cancer.
Q. What do you get with a happy meal?
A. Cancer.

Can someone tell me is five feet tall normal for an eight year old? Or perhaps the poor mite's problem is glandular.

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Message 11 - posted by FatPeace - A Promise to Heather, Feb 26, 2007

As usual Social Services poke their noses in where they're not wanted. Instead of threatening this lad and his mum they should get the basics right - babies and children on the 'at-risk' register are still being KILLED on a weekly basis by fathers / mother's boyfriends etc, and yet they're more fussed about a fat kid.

Social Services should not be there to act as fat police and tell people how much salad their kids should be eating. It's bad enough that those with a BMI of over 25 are automatically barred from adopting children in most jurisdictions.

I'm sure there are deeper issues here that have been conveniently glossed over by our black-and-white, simplify everything and make it a moral issue media. His mum isn't exactly skinny, so there's a genetic predisposition before you even start, and we haven't even seen the father.

By the way I'm about 15 stone (so heavier than this lad, although a good foot taller) and I've never broken a bicycle, bed or loo seat - I'm sure the Sun are telling porkies here, and if that's the case, shame on them.

I was actually quite impressed with the BBC's sensitive approach to this story this morning - interviewed the mum, quick input from a dietician, none of the usual daily sky-is-falling hystrionics we've come to associate with Auntie where this subject is concerned.

What needs to be remembered is that how ever they may massage the statistics, telling us that four aout of five kids are overweight etc, cases such as this lad are incredibly rare, and are almost never as simple as overeating and insufficient excercise.

My main concern over this (apart from the immense psychological damage probably being done to both child and mother - who already seem pretty vulnerable - by this media circus and the often highly unpleasant tone of the press coverage) is the dangerous precedent set. It already happened in the case of another teenager who suffered from Prader-Willi syndrome (inability to stop eating) with little account taken of the condition.

If heavy-handed social workers can wade in all guns blazing and snatch this lad from his parents whats to stop them doing the same for children who are only a couple of stone over the 'approved' weight limits?
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Message 12 - posted by asianboyleeds, Feb 26, 2007

so ruch_edwards79 what you're trying to tell us is that fat is the new thin ? :O)
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Message 13 - posted by Alexander Rednaxela, Feb 26, 2007

Q. What do you get with a happy meal?
A. Cancer.

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? Bowel cancer ? Or just from meat in general ?


Can someone tell me is five feet tall normal for an eight year old? Or perhaps the poor mite's problem is glandular.

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Yes there is this gland that makes you eat too much lol.

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Message 14 - posted by FatPeace - A Promise to Heather, Feb 26, 2007

so rich_edwards79 what you're trying to tell us is that fat is the new thin ? :O)

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I wouldn't go that far, however some equality of treatment and a bit of consistency in reporting would be nice. Over a million British people suffer from anorexia, bulimia and other eating as a result of our obsessively weight-conscious society, a large proportion of them teenage girls. I can't say I recall the last time one of them made headlines in a national newspaper, or when the parents of such a teenager were prosecuted for not forcing cake into their child's mouth. But then, being fat has become a deeply moral issue in the UK, and deeply linked with notions of personal worth and social responsibility.
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Message 15 - posted by charmOffensive, Feb 26, 2007

15 stone Rich? lightweight!! :-)

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Message 16 - posted by thedukeofhunslet, Feb 26, 2007

I shall be tuning into TV to watch this. I've got a tenner that says his mums a bit of a ten-ton-tessie as well.

These people have a gene that makes them eat - its natures way of weeding out the weak ensuring mankind is repopulated only by the strongest and blondest specimans. <laugh>

My local Morrisons is tragically bursting with them (no pun intended as anyone who's been to moggies will know that the isles are quite narrow) stuffing their trollies with crisps and pop and pizzas.
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Message 17, Feb 26, 2007

This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.
      

Message 18 - posted by FarkaryTwarx, Feb 27, 2007

I normally agree with you Rich, but on this issue I am in complete disagreement.
We're not talking about an adult here, we're talking about an 8 year old child who is 4 times their normal weight. His mother is evidently totally inept at raising a child if she has allowed him to get to this state.
When I was a kid I ate what I was told, i.e the same meat, veg and fruit that my parents ate. If I was hungry between meals I was told to wait.
That is called being a good parent. Don't you see that a child is not able to make an informed choice about their diet? They don't know what is good for them, hence they have to be told. It's called discipline.

This woman evidently just lets her son eat whatever he choses (i.e junk food) and then complains because she isn't being helped by the state. The sort of attitude I find appalling frankly.
People like this aren't fit to bring up children if they can't even feed them properly, even most animals seem to be able to do that perfectly well without imput from a team of social workers.

As usual Social Services poke their noses in where they're not wanted. Instead of threatening this lad and his mum they should get the basics right - babies and children on the 'at-risk' register are still being KILLED on a weekly basis by fathers / mother's boyfriends etc, and yet they're more fussed about a fat kid.

Social Services should not be there to act as fat police and tell people how much salad their kids should be eating. It's bad enough that those with a BMI of over 25 are automatically barred from adopting children in most jurisdictions.

I'm sure there are deeper issues here that have been conveniently glossed over by our black-and-white, simplify everything and make it a moral issue media. His mum isn't exactly skinny, so there's a genetic predisposition before you even start, and we haven't even seen the father.

By the way I'm about 15 stone (so heavier than this lad, although a good foot taller) and I've never broken a bicycle, bed or loo seat - I'm sure the Sun are telling porkies here, and if that's the case, shame on them.

I was actually quite impressed with the BBC's sensitive approach to this story this morning - interviewed the mum, quick input from a dietician, none of the usual daily sky-is-falling hystrionics we've come to associate with Auntie where this subject is concerned.

What needs to be remembered is that how ever they may massage the statistics, telling us that four aout of five kids are overweight etc, cases such as this lad are incredibly rare, and are almost never as simple as overeating and insufficient excercise.

My main concern over this (apart from the immense psychological damage probably being done to both child and mother - who already seem pretty vulnerable - by this media circus and the often highly unpleasant tone of the press coverage) is the dangerous precedent set. It already happened in the case of another teenager who suffered from Prader-Willi syndrome (inability to stop eating) with little account taken of the condition.

If heavy-handed social workers can wade in all guns blazing and snatch this lad from his parents whats to stop them doing the same for children who are only a couple of stone over the 'approved' weight limits?

Quoted from this message

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Message 19 - posted by FatPeace - A Promise to Heather, Feb 27, 2007

Farkary Twarx, I can see why this story gets the reaction it does but I stand by my assertion that far nmore damage will be caused to this lad's mental health and overall development by taking him into care (whether that be with foster parents or, more likely, an institutional setting) than keeping him at home with a loving (if rather depressed and dysfunctional) mum and providing the necesary assistance.

Having seen the show I'm even more convinced that there are underlying medical issues behind Connor's weight and appetite. The kids is over a foot taller than any of his peers for goodness sake! The programme hinted that he was due to be examined by doctors to ascertain if this was the case (although obviously they didn't place too much emphasis on this, as they no doubt didn't want to distract from the 'overeating=obesity' message being sent out).

I think that this kid has been singled out as an example and held up as the empbodiment of the 'obesity epidemic' which they claim is sweeping the Western World. However theyneglect to mention that cases such as this are still unbelievably rare. Most of the obesity 'problem' results from kids who are just a few pounds outside the notoriously narrow BMI bands.

I do strongly believe that this underlying judgemental climate of moral condemnation and blame directed towards fat people in the UK is driving the method of official intervention which would be significantly more sympathetic were an anorexic child or any other form of self-harmer involved. People faced with such a situation are generally offered medical and psychological assistance rather than the threat of State intervention.

Whilst the child will undoubtedly suffer health issues in the future, he's in no immediate danger (unlike genuine 'abuse' cases) and in any case I'd dispute whether these ill-effects would be significantly worse than those suffered by a thin child who gorged on fast food, the aforementioned anorexic or even someone whose parents smoked constantly around their offspring. What about these ASBO kids whose social development and life chances are being destroyed by the bad example set by parents? I don't see any demands to have these kids taken into care.

Fat is physically very obvious, hence an easy target both for the personal morality police and the State.


I normally agree with you Rich, but on this issue I am in complete disagreement.
We're not talking about an adult here, we're talking about an 8 year old child who is 4 times their normal weight. His mother is evidently totally inept at raising a child if she has allowed him to get to this state.
When I was a kid I ate what I was told, i.e the same meat, veg and fruit that my parents ate. If I was hungry between meals I was told to wait.
That is called being a good parent. Don't you see that a child is not able to make an informed choice about their diet? They don't know what is good for them, hence they have to be told. It's called discipline.

This woman evidently just lets her son eat whatever he choses (i.e junk food) and then complains because she isn't being helped by the state. The sort of attitude I find appalling frankly.
People like this aren't fit to bring up children if they can't even feed them properly, even most animals seem to be able to do that perfectly well without imput from a team of social workers.

As usual Social Services poke their noses in where they're not wanted. Instead of threatening this lad and his mum they should get the basics right - babies and children on the 'at-risk' register are still being KILLED on a weekly basis by fathers / mother's boyfriends etc, and yet they're more fussed about a fat kid.

Social Services should not be there to act as fat police and tell people how much salad their kids should be eating. It's bad enough that those with a BMI of over 25 are automatically barred from adopting children in most jurisdictions.

I'm sure there are deeper issues here that have been conveniently glossed over by our black-and-white, simplify everything and make it a moral issue media. His mum isn't exactly skinny, so there's a genetic predisposition before you even start, and we haven't even seen the father.

By the way I'm about 15 stone (so heavier than this lad, although a good foot taller) and I've never broken a bicycle, bed or loo seat - I'm sure the Sun are telling porkies here, and if that's the case, shame on them.

I was actually quite impressed with the BBC's sensitive approach to this story this morning - interviewed the mum, quick input from a dietician, none of the usual daily sky-is-falling hystrionics we've come to associate with Auntie where this subject is concerned.

What needs to be remembered is that how ever they may massage the statistics, telling us that four aout of five kids are overweight etc, cases such as this lad are incredibly rare, and are almost never as simple as overeating and insufficient excercise.

My main concern over this (apart from the immense psychological damage probably being done to both child and mother - who already seem pretty vulnerable - by this media circus and the often highly unpleasant tone of the press coverage) is the dangerous precedent set. It already happened in the case of another teenager who suffered from Prader-Willi syndrome (inability to stop eating) with little account taken of the condition.

If heavy-handed social workers can wade in all guns blazing and snatch this lad from his parents whats to stop them doing the same for children who are only a couple of stone over the 'approved' weight limits?

Quoted from this message

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Message 20 - posted by Danmouth, Feb 27, 2007

<laugh> Fatty broke the toilet seat <laugh>
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