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Discussion:

Practicing Catholics now outnumber Anglicans in the UK.

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Message 1 - posted by U6532874, Feb 16, 2007

Maybe they should have the parish churches back?

A huge increase in numbers and enthusiasm has apparently been brought about by the influx of temporary workers from central european countries.Locals enjoy the numbers the dynamism and the practical spirituality. The indolent and sleepy priests are struggling to keep up.
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Message 2 - posted by minnie3, Feb 16, 2007

I am glad of it. Although i am not a catholic, it is good to see christian revival in Britain.
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Message 3 - posted by 800lbGorilla, Feb 16, 2007

Probably won't suit you very well, Cove - all those good Catholics producing lots of church-going children - Church power increasing, religious influence growing - rescission of lots of PC legislation!!
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Message 4 - posted by U6532874, Feb 16, 2007

I shall look forward to a catholic monarch.
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Message 5 - posted by 800lbGorilla, Feb 16, 2007

But I thought you didn't want any monarch, Cove? Suddenly become a Royalist?
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Message 6 - posted by U6532874, Feb 16, 2007

I am not a monarchist but while royalists fail to see the light it seems only right that the incumbent should follow the one true faith.A bit of Roman influence behind the scenes would add a little spice.
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Message 7 - posted by Slimtone, Feb 17, 2007

Be a bit awkward for our Royals, with all the divorcing that goes on!!
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Message 8 - posted by annalore, Mar 6, 2007

I shall look forward to a catholic monarch.

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I wonder what is the policy of all the political parties in the UK on this question? <erm>
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Message 9 - posted by TaylorJ2000, Mar 28, 2007

Reading about religion of Christainity slowly coming back, I am pleased. But what I'm not happy about is those rebal Cathlics! Henry VIII got rid of them hundreds of years ago to bring out the true Christainity, Protesent (or Angilain as we not call it).
If these Cathlics get more approval, then sometime in the future there will be a second, but modern civil war, between Cathlics and Protesents. And also a divided country, just like whats being happening to Ireland. I'm a Protesent Christain and like any other Christain would ever do go to church every Sunday. I'm against these Cathlics and I wish that they had never returned to Protesent Britain ever.
Besides I like the royals (execpt the Prince of Wales) they helped us in both world wars. Her Majesty is our Protesent Queen, which means that Britain IS a Protesent country and WILL always be Protesent and no other religion will rise above the Protesent Christains and Country.
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Message 10 - posted by minnie3, Mar 28, 2007

I think christianity is different now and people don't think in the same ways as they did in Tudor times about it.Alot of it was to do with power and using religion to control people.

There are so many different christian groups in Britain and isn't there legislation against ever having a catholic monarch again.
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Message 11 - posted by U6532874, Mar 28, 2007

She may be a protestant Queen but the next bod in the random game of hereditory succession has made it plain that he will not accept the same deal and wants simply to be defender of faiths.no contemporary british parliament would baulk at disestablishment of the anglican church and when scotland breaks free and the Act of Union is removed there is no reason why religion should have anything to do whatever with the English state or constitution (whatever that might be).
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Message 12 - posted by Slimtone, Mar 28, 2007

It's probably time the Scots were off. Watching PM's Question Time today, and listening to the impertinent Scottish Nationalists made my blood boil! What are they doing here when they have their own Parliament? Talk about wanting your cake and eating it!!
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Message 13 - posted by U1688149, Mar 29, 2007

The Act making the Church of England the established church was enacted by the old English Parliament. The Act barring Catholics from the throne is likewise an Act of the old English Parliament. I fail to see why you could possibly have taken the view that the 1707 Act of Union or Scotland for that matter had anything to do with these hangovers from the pre-union English Parliament?

As for the SNP MPs. The Scottish Parliament only deals with certain issues, other issues still remain with Westminster. There should be an English Parliament. However we have a flawed constitution that only seems prepared to deliver change to those that ask for it the loudest. You only need to consider how the franchise was slowly given to different groups before becomming truly universal in 1928.

What makes my blood boil more is the way in which devolution for Northern Ireland is positively applauded. The government has spent more in funding and maintaining the six counties of Northern Ireland than it has spent on a comparable base of the population in the rest of the UK.

In contrast devolution for Scotland and Wales is loathed. There has been no campaign of violence for a Scottish Parliament. It has been achieved by purely peaceful means. The issue has been debated on an off for the best part of a century in Scotland. Over the same period there has been no consideration of the issue (until now) in England. If anything the whole issue was seen as an irrelevance. It is not the fault of Scots if the English have not seen fit to mount a campaign for a similar Parliament.

The UK is a country that only changes the constitution to appease those who shout loudest.
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Message 14 - posted by U1688149, Mar 29, 2007

Returning to the subject matter of the thread. I think the survey is misleading. It is probably only counting those that go to church on ordinary sundays outwith the Easter and Christmas period. I do know that in some cities Church of England parishes are getting by on congregations of less than 70 people on an ordinary Sunday. In contrast the Catholic Church parishes seem to worry if a city parish attendance drops below 200 on an ordinary sunday.

However, if the survey were to look at Easter and Christmas I think you would find the numbers of Anglicans at Church somewhat higher than those in the Catholic church.

The survey should possibly be reworded as being "The number of practicising Catholics outnumbers the number of practising Anglicans who go to church in the UK on an ordinary Sunday."
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Message 15 - posted by Jem, Mar 31, 2007

I went to church recently after many years and found that they no longer have hymns but 'songs' and no sermon but people telling 'stories'. There was also a band. The Vicars 'help' acted out a story of sin. Tins of baked beans where poured over peoples heads depicting 'sin'. I didn't know any of the 'songs' and there were many black people there swaying backwards and forwards singing gospel. Not that I had anything against them. I felt let down and didn't really enjoy it. My daughter on the other hand thought it was great.

Do they do the same in Catholic churches nowadays or do they still have the traditional services?
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Message 16 - posted by U7334133, Mar 31, 2007

Yes - the Catholics have moved on just a bit. You would stiil recognise most of the hymns & we still have a collection!

This 'baked beans' idea struck me - I just cannot wait to have a word with our priest tomorrow. Do you think he'll go for it?- his sermons need uplifting on occasions.
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Message 17 - posted by U7410096 - alt id 2, Mar 31, 2007

Why did you go?

What type of church was it?

What were you hoping to experience? What is the virtue of the Book of Common Prayer today except as a work of literary merit and historical curiosity?

The Vatican removed the tridentine mass three or more decades ago. Catholic services are pretty relaxed as well.
I went to church recently after many years and found that they no longer have hymns but 'songs' and no sermon but people telling 'stories'. There was also a band. The Vicars 'help' acted out a story of sin. Tins of baked beans where poured over peoples heads depicting 'sin'. I didn't know any of the 'songs' and there were many black people there swaying backwards and forwards singing gospel. Not that I had anything against them. I felt let down and didn't really enjoy it. My daughter on the other hand thought it was great.

Do they do the same in Catholic churches nowadays or do they still have the traditional services?

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Message 18 - posted by U6532874, Mar 31, 2007

How were they impertinent?
It's probably time the Scots were off. Watching PM's Question Time today, and listening to the impertinent Scottish Nationalists made my blood boil! What are they doing here when they have their own Parliament? Talk about wanting your cake and eating it!!

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Message 19 - posted by Jem, Mar 31, 2007

Why did you go?

What type of church was it?

What were you hoping to experience? What is the virtue of the Book of Common Prayer today except as a work of literary merit and historical curiosity?

My daughter and I were visiting the country and as she is Orthodox wanted to see what it was all about.

It was a Church of England parish church.

I wanted to experience some of the magic that I had years ago. Unfortunately it didn't happen for me.

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Message 20 - posted by Slimtone, Mar 31, 2007

Alex Salmond's questions to Blair were personal and offensive and unacceptable, in my view..I am not apologising for Blair, but as always there is a right way to do things and Salmond appears to have little idea about common courtesy.
How were they impertinent?
It's probably time the Scots were off. Watching PM's Question Time today, and listening to the impertinent Scottish Nationalists made my blood boil! What are they doing here when they have their own Parliament? Talk about wanting your cake and eating it!!

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