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Discussion:

Dangerous Cargo off World Heritage Coast

Messages  41 - 54 of 54

 
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Message 41 - posted by U7209542 - alt id 7 (all banned), Jan 30, 2007

Local fishermen seem determined to make matters worse by not keeping a proper look out for salvage vessels removing the containers.
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Message 42 - posted by John of Paddington, Feb 1, 2007

It seems this ship could be there for a year, despite what the Government say, Falmouth is a deepwater port and containers could have been unloaded. They have 'lost' 43 containers and what the full cost of the damage will be we will never be told, Over 300 birds oiled, how many dead?
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Message 43 - posted by John of Paddington, Feb 1, 2007

It seems this ship could be there for a year, despite what the Government say, Falmouth is a deepwater port and containers could have been unloaded. They have 'lost' 43 containers and what the full cost of the damage will be we will never be told, Over 1600 birds oiled, how many dead?
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Message 44 - posted by Devon_Dumpling, Feb 1, 2007

John, the weather precluded access to Falmouth and if it went under while en route there then the oil slick would have wiped out the jurassic coast and a lot more than the piddling 1,600 birds would have suffered oil pollution.

Oh yes I forgot, the oil slick would have caused mayhem in the Exe estuary.
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Message 45 - posted by John of Paddington, Feb 2, 2007

DD, It was only a short distance from Falmouth when it ran into trouble. The tow out into the Chanel on route to France made matters worse and the diversion to Portland was an emergency action. The damage caused by the tow made this impossible and the ship was beached to try to save the cargo. The drinking water of Exeter may now be poluted by deisel, co- incidence maybe. This whole event has been botch after botch, the only sustaned link has been making money.
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Message 46 - posted by U7334133, Feb 2, 2007

Two things are infinite; the universe & human stupidity - but there is some doubt about the universe.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has not tried anything new. (Einstein).
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Message 47 - posted by Devon_Dumpling, Feb 2, 2007

John, you are still missing the point. Once it became apparent that the Napoli was not going to make Portland, it became essential to run it aground to avoid it sinking in mid-channel.
If it had sunk it would have been both a major navigation hazard and a pollution time bomb with thousands of tonnes of fuel oil and diesel waiting to leak into the channel.
If you want to know how serious that would be, look up the Torrey Canyon disaster!
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Message 48 - posted by John of Paddington, Feb 4, 2007

DD, no its you thats missing the point, the ship should have been taken inti the shelter of Falmouth for examination before being towed out to an open an hostile sea. Did you seen the TV images of the mess on the sea bed? The Tug, as is their normal buisiness, snatched the chance of Salvage and headed for its home port. It was known that the ship had broken its back and the Tug Master should have volunteered, or been told to bring it into shelterted wateres before the damage worstened.
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Message 49 - posted by Devon_Dumpling, Feb 4, 2007

Well John, it seems we must agree to disagree.

The weather was storm 10 to violent storm 11 and I believe that that the only option for the tugs was to turn and run from the wind.

It seems most unlikely that if they had tried they would have got Napoli into Falmouth. More likely, after it had sunk and released thousands of continers and thousands of tonnes of fuel oil into the channel, we would be discussing why they had towed the ship towards Falmouth - which could have ended up being closed for a year with the wreck in its approach channel.

A lot of the images of damage to the seabed that I have seen were as a result of scallop dredging lthough I'm sure some damage must have occurred when Napoli was beached.
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Message 50 - posted by John of Paddington, Feb 9, 2007

More goods are being washed up on the beaches of South Devon from the wreck of the Napoli. The papers are playing down the amout of birds oiled and killed. We seem to be be getting a 'dumbed down' version of just what is going on. Why?
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Message 51 - posted by formerly-warning, Feb 9, 2007

So that you can trot out some trite conspiracy theory, blaming the entire accident on the current government?
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Message 52 - posted by John of Paddington, Mar 17, 2007

Things are getting worse. It is a scandle that this ship ended up of the heritage coast. The Government refuse an enquiry in case the truth comes out. Their Minister is to blame. He gave permission for the detour to Portland and the beaching off Branscombe. The tugmaster should have been told to have brought the ship inti the shelter of Falmouth Bay for examination before towing it across the channel to France.
www.bbc.co.uk/ devon/content/articles/2007/02/28/napoli_bird_toll_rises_feature.shtml

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Message 53 - posted by Devon_Dumpling, Mar 17, 2007

John, the skipper of the tug, when at sea towing a damaged ship, cannot, and must not be told where to tow the ship to by some administrator on the land.

Imagine, for a moment, that you had been the administrator who had ordered the ship towed to Falmouth. Now imagine, as would probably happened, the ship has gone down spreading thousands of tons of fuel oil along the south coast. Who would be to blame?

What if people had died when it went down? Who would be to blame for that?
Would it be the administrator?

Well I know you worked for the Police and so would somehow managed to weasel your way out of taking the blame - and the pollution problem would have been horrendous!#

John please accept that things are not getting worse, they are constantly getting better.

Until that is a certain county coucil decided to hold a public enquiry.

A short while ago it was said the coucil were overstaffed. It seems that the sole purpose of the ublic enquiry is to ensure continuity in the employment of its senior staff.

Reducing the operating costs of DCC is irrelevant. In short it is to help justify their excessive increase in rate charge.
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Message 54 - posted by John of Paddington, Mar 17, 2007

DD where di you get those 'Rose tinted glasses', the Napoli is a disaster that need not have happened. The Devon and Cornwall Police are still scrapping the egg off their faces and the Government refuses to refund the cost of clearup bourne by the Council. It is more than possible that, to save the cost, the hull will not be removed, someone will point out the it is making a good breakwater and preventing cliff erosion.
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This discussion is tagged with:
- Devon
- pollution
- environment
- animals
- birds
- wildlife
- jurassic coast
- cargo ship"
- Lyme Bay"
- MSC Napoli"
- World Heritage Site"
- sea bird santuary"

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Messages  41 - 54 of 54

 


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