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Discussion:

Do G.P's need to consult a G.P.?

Messages  1 - 14 of 14

 
 
 

Message 1 - posted by Lizziedripping, Oct 22, 2006

Does a lawyer need to get a lawyer?
Does a politician need to appeal to another politition?
Does an estate agent need to get an estate agent?
Does a medical specialist consultant need to consult another medical specialist consultant?

Is the common denominator? They are not hands on?
Let's think of a few more.
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Message 2 - posted by stevetaal, Oct 22, 2006

Does a lawyer need to get a lawyer?
Does a politician need to appeal to another politition?
Does an estate agent need to get an estate agent?
Does a medical specialist consultant need to consult another medical specialist consultant?

Is the common denominator? They are not hands on?
Let's think of a few more.

Quoted from this message



Lawyers can represent themselves.

Politicians collaborate but that doesn't make them any less hands on.

Esate agents can act for themselves.

Medical specialists can treat themselves but usually consult others because it is difficult to be objective about your own health.


Some more?

OK, does a plumber ever work with other plumbers?
Do bricklayers work in gangs?

How about those for starters?

Being professional doesn't necessarily make you less hands on.
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Message 3 - posted by Lizziedripping, Oct 22, 2006

A surgeon couldn't go it alone for sure but then he /she is "hands on". The non hands on professional sure can make a secure, comfortable living but should they be so indespensible if there was equality in our education system?
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Message 4 - posted by stevetaal, Oct 22, 2006

A surgeon couldn't go it alone for sure but then he /she is "hands on". The non hands on professional sure can make a secure, comfortable living but should they be so indespensible if there was equality in our education system?

Quoted from this message



Not sure what you mean when you refer to an inequality in the education system - please expand.
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Message 5 - posted by Lizziedripping, Oct 22, 2006

A while back Astro angel delared that there may be difficulty getting G.P's to do the operations that the governmant have suggested that they should do. I'm inclined to agree but whild a G.P's patient has not had the opportunity to learn all about the human body (digesting Gray's Anatomy) they will continue to be idle s--'s.
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Message 6, Oct 22, 2006

This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.
      

Message 7 - posted by Lizziedripping, Oct 22, 2006

The G.P not being hands on.

A lot of the patients don't have the opportunity to go on to higher education and their lower education is often class controlled. ie determined by the wealth and/or influence of their parents.
Just a thought.
Fear not. I'm accustomed to being ignored and the ignorers are probably right. I'm mad!
Thanks.
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Message 8 - posted by stevetaal, Oct 22, 2006

That isn't true Pom. The Open University gives everyone the opportunity to go on to higher education.

OU fees are paid for you if your income is lower than 15545 per annum.

As for GPs not being hands on - not sure I agree with you there. GPs do all sorts of things on a hands on basis. They administer injections, take blood samples, measure BP (I know nurses do these things too)as well as some of the more unpleasant jobs like rectal examination and genital examination.

In some GPs surgeries the more routine 'hands on' jobs are done by the nurse in order to free the GP to spend time on diagnosis.

I wouldn't say my GP is lazy or not hands on.

GPs are expected to have a very broad knowledge of medicine, which is an enormously difficult job. They refer patients to specialists because their job is to identify the problem and ensure that the patient get the treatment they need. It isn't their job to perform surgery or pysiotherapy.
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Message 9 - posted by Lizziedripping, Oct 22, 2006

But it is true about the patient's formative years of education? Do you know I used to be a staunch Tory but as the years go by I'm sounding more and more like a socialist! Glad that you have a good G.P experience I expect there will be loads of postings backing your theory that the majority in this Country are as good.My G P? Wouldn't know me if he wanted to!
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Message 10 - posted by stevetaal, Oct 22, 2006

We all have access to education as a right. Up to the age of 16 education is compulsory and although a few people spend their early years trying to avoid going to school, the vast majority will attain some educational qualification.

The opportunity is there for all and aside from the fact that some schools are better than others (which would be the subject of a different thread)everyone has equal opportunities at the most basic level.

Post 16, education is not mandatory but is available either through colleges or post 18 through the Open University.

There are people who have personal circumstances that make it difficult to take advantage of the opportunities available, but they do exist and if a person really wants to access them they will find a way.

I suspect that you were unlucky enough to have been given bad advice by your careers tutor.

If you would like to take advantage of the opportunities available, why not go and have a look at the OU website and see what you think. Dont forget that financial support is available if yiou need it.
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Message 11 - posted by Lizziedripping, Oct 22, 2006

"If you would like to take advantage of the opportunities available, why not go and have a look at the OU website and see what you think. Dont forget that financial support is available if yiou need it."

Oo! Do you think I could get to be a G.P. who sits on her backside doing sweet fanny all and being paid for it. That's made me think of another thread. Steve. You are encourable!
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Message 12 - posted by pompomwhiting, Dec 13, 2007

Well, there we are. Menapaused, disillusioned with the N.H.S Pom is not the only one who would prefer to consult a Pharmacist than a G.P.

G.P's were still decent, get to know you sorts when Pom's girls were teenagers. I don't know if they were like their Mum and asked our G.P. for the contraceptive pill. No prospect of grandchildren so I can't say. "when we were young....." Those were the days when G.P's were worth the expense of employment.
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Message 13 - posted by Mr_Secretary230, Dec 13, 2007

Pom, my problem with people having consultations weith the pharmacist is the possible delays.
while in consulting cubicle etc, the pharmacist is not there to dispence prescriptions, so longer waits could be expected. :(

Sec230
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Message 14 - posted by lysis, Dec 14, 2007

Does a lawyer need to get a lawyer?.

Quoted from this message



The lawyer who acts for himself has fool for a client.

Two heads are better than one.
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