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Discussion:

Does Prison Work?

Messages  1 - 3 of 3

 
 
 

Message 1 - posted by Jonathan Vernon-Smith, Jan 27, 2006

The number of people recalled to jails in England and Wales for breaching release conditions has risen 250% since 2000, says HM Inspectorate of Prisons.
Some 11,081 inmates were recalled in 2004/05, compared with 3,182 in 00/01.
Chief Inspector of Prisons Anne Owers said the rise was "staggering" and jails needed to be more aware of the support recalled prisoners might need.
The government said a range of measures were already in place to improve the recall process.

So if prisoners are coming out of prison and going straight back in again, something is wrong!

Do you think that prison is working?

If not, then why not? Why are prisoners coming out and re-offending or breaking the rules of their release?

Do you think that prisons are failing to put enough effort into rehabilitation?

Do you think that tagging works? Or does this rise in the recall rate just prove that tagging doesn’t work?

Do you think that tagging does work, but it should only be used for prisoners who have committed a minor crime - such as Rev Alfred Ridley who refused to pay his council tax?

Do you think that prisoners need more support when they are released?

Or do you think that prison is too soft which is why prisoners are seemingly happy to go straight back in there?

If you think prison should be tougher, how so? Would you like to see a return to the old days of the ball and chain?

Do you think that more prisons need to be built in order to keep prisoners locked up for longer?

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This is the subject of today's Phone in on BBC Radio Northampton between 1pm and 2pm on 104.2 and 103.6FM. Tune in and have your say!
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Message 2 - posted by Norant, Jan 27, 2006

hello griff,


prisons do work,but only for the few?

the prison enviroment these days is a very boring insular place where you are put as a punishment,the prison ethos is that yoor punishment is being there you are not there to be punished which is totally wrong.

prisoners are afforded to much in the way of luxury these days,playstations,televisions,and the all inspiring ability to be able to mix with there peers and compare there crimes,


there are a majority of prisoners who end up in there through relitivley minor crimes and that will be there last ever experience of prison,and there is the other end of the spectrum where you have the repeat offenders in there who will always end up in them institutions because its the way that they live.they view prison as a minor hiccupp in thier oh so filled lives and they are getting out even earlier these days because of tagging.


some prisons have a good programme of education and skills that you can learn whilst you are there,and if you tried you really could come out a better person,but this hardcore of persistent criminals only use this valuable resource so that there time in there is less boring it gets them out of there cells and into a classroom where they can chat with there mates.

drugs are absolute rife in prison and so is the home made grog,the prison officers do a very good job and are kind and considerate and will try there very best to help you if you need that help,but a lot of the prisoners they see,they have seen on more than one occasion during there service as a prison officer.


prisoners are given a lot of freedom in prison,if you put a prisoner in a cell with a book and a radio and keep him locked up for the majority of his time he would think twice before committing another offence,let them do what they wish and give them the playstations and tvs and videos in there cell,then they see it as a minor hiccup,and a little break before they hit the streets again and probably the first granny they see?

the all knowing norant is off again,well i do speak from experience because i was inprisoned in 1995 for quite a while,i never had a playstation or television or video recorder in my cell,i ahd a radio a book and i was in my cell nearly all the time apart from excercise.i never hit a granny and i have never stole in my life,and i have never ever been back to prison or committed another offence.

i met a lot of decent people in prison that includes people doing life sentences,and altough i have never seen any of them ever again whilst i was there they were good friends,just goes to show that a small mistake can lead to a life changing experience.

just my veiw.


norant.



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Message 3 - posted by Yodell, Jan 27, 2006

The definition of prison is a place of confinement but thanks to the PC court of human rights etc, so much exercise, relaxation, mixing time etc has to be given as well as a 'goal' even for lifers to aim for and so 'achieve' whilst in captivity.

For the undoubted most guilty of all crimes - murder - there should only be one sentence and it doesn't include any of the above.

For anything heavy that didn't result in an actual death but the intent and potential was there - that should be life to include 23 hours a day locked inside the cell and if the poor buggers start talking to themselves or whistling funny tunes then so be it.

That reverend's crime doesn't even hardly count in my book - he failed to pay what was the rise in his council tax over and above the inflation rate of what his pension went up- so what - it's the government who squander our money and the law who enforce this type of easy target instead of ridding our streets of true crime that got this wrong.
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This discussion is tagged with:
- Northamptonshire
- tagging
- prisons

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