Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html en-gb 30 Tue 28 Jul 2015 11:12:23 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html ImranT http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html?page=80#comment4 I personally think based on what I have read and have heard, the assasination of Benazir Bhutto and free aftermath election was all part of the game. Now whose game was it or who planned it no one can surely tell. Mr.Musharrafs Resigning after a short period and Mr.Asif Zardari elected as Prime minister in such unbalanced conditions of a country makes a citizen into a mysterious doubt. The internal affairs of Pakistan are demolished, bombings , terroism has become common now. Blamming America or being against or with them does not really effect citizens of Pakistan. All they care is that the country should be stable now and there should be absolute calm environment all over. Government has always been corrupt and will remain corrupt, now its all on citizens of Pakistan to build themselves on to a stage where they can start changing the country. If I was given a chance to become a Prime minister of President of Pakistan I would exactly do the same as our current leaders are doing, because its so unfair to leave all the country's burden and handling over such unbalanced country to a newbie. Its citizens who are responsible for the country.PEACE Mon 06 Oct 2008 16:45:45 GMT+1 FirmBenevolence http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html?page=60#comment3 Xie_Ming 'Contrary to the usual media refrains, Musharref has always seemed to me to be one of Pakistan's most personally honorable people- and remains so.'A comment i believe most whole heartedly agree with even among the media, the dichotomy To speak plainly arises out of the west’s need to give the Taliban a voice in ordered politics, I do not consider this to be something that Musarref was unaware of when the Judges were removed from office regardless the current situation can only be seen as an effective stride towards democracy.John from Hendon Wrote: "Washington man" 'No country with at least some from of democracy likes to feel that it has elected the agent of a foreign power as its leader and despite all of it democratic shortcomings Pakistan is reasonably democratic'True Pakistan is democratic one can only hope Pakistan can balance the feudal rules on its borders with those of its western allies in these times when Georgia could fall it is apparent that democracy from the perspective of any country is about both the balance of internal powers but also external influence. Mon 18 Aug 2008 21:18:01 GMT+1 John_from_Hendon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html?page=40#comment2 Robin, you write that - Musharraf was "Washington's man""Washington's man" must be the most dreaded sobriquet for any leader - It is (unfortunately) associated with the Judas kiss (of death, or of at least premature retirement.) In this World of one super power it really shows the limitation of the 'super-ness'. No country with at least some from of democracy likes to feel that it has elected the agent of a foreign power as its leader and despite all of it democratic shortcomings Pakistan is reasonably democratic by the standards of the World. (Even the periods of military rule have ended quietly.) (Ex) President Musharraf, to his credit, allowed himself to be voted out of power. The gigantic problem of the talibanisation of the northwest territories that resulted from CIA inspired promotion of insurgents against Russian dominance of Afghanistan remains. I can only see development and spreading of education as a solution to this problem as the physical geography prevents any form of successful military solution. Above all what we must not see is another of Pakistan's leaders being called "Washington's man" - they must be Pakistan's man or woman.Even calling someone "Washington's man" in the USA is just as problematic! Mon 18 Aug 2008 14:09:08 GMT+1 oldnat http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html?page=20#comment1 Xie-Ming "In Pakistani history, one sees frequent military administrations. What conditions provoked this? Do those conditions persist? Is another military administration therefore likely?"You might like to take a look at Boris Wilke : "State-Formation and the Military in Pakistan".It's on the web as a pdf document, so I can't post the link. Mon 18 Aug 2008 13:47:43 GMT+1 Xie_Ming http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/worldtonight/2008/08/musharraf_the_end.html?page=0#comment0 Contrary to the usual media refrains, Musharref has always seemed to me to be one of Pakistan's most personally honorable people- and remains so.Washington has, as usual, fouled things up, and little good can be expected for Pakistan, at least under the presently expiring administration in the USA.In Pakistani history, one sees frequent military administrations. What conditions provoked this? Do those conditions persist? Is another military administration therefore likely? Mon 18 Aug 2008 11:57:47 GMT+1