Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml en-gb 30 Thu 10 Jul 2014 16:36:44 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml russell of hertfordshire http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=98#comment54 Excellent. In the 1980's I discovered an album called White Noise, which I think is by Delia and the Radiophonic Workshop. It is utterly different from anything else you are likely to hear by any other artists, and would have to be placed in its own category; it is utterly unique and for anybody interested in experimentation with sound and musical ideas will find it something of a treasure-store. Recently rediscovered it again, and it is still equally intriguing, or maybe even more so. Delia's styles and techniques were of a lost time when new sounds needed new techniques to be developed to create them. In an age when being inventive requires little more than pressing a different button, I hope that Delia makes an untimely revival; roll on the cds; shame it's all too late for her to receive any recognition. Delia rules and I agree that Dr. Who [I grew up with the early 70's version] is not only the best sci-fi theme, but the best tv theme in toto. Mon 20 Apr 2009 13:53:53 GMT+1 resistanceisuseless http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=96#comment53 i think creating derbyshire archive a tad spurious considering bbc have axed their experimental music prog. what kind of schizo mentality must bbc they? think!it's time to realise these people say they care but in truth are anti art and anti anything even slightly esoteric.don't encourage them! Sat 02 Aug 2008 10:21:11 GMT+1 dottavi http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=94#comment52 Great, but I'm not really interested so much in Dr Who's soundtrack, while I'm really impressed by the "experimental dance track". Should we rename this beautiful track "Don't forget about this", honouring her words in the beginning?But so sorry that the player on BBC's News page does not allow to embed that on my blog...Anyway, everything always very interesting, thnx Thu 31 Jul 2008 09:57:34 GMT+1 dottavi http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=92#comment51 This post has been Removed Thu 31 Jul 2008 09:44:24 GMT+1 jenniferohso http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=90#comment50 After having a secret lust for BBC sound effects recordings for years, listening to them under the sheets and yearning for more, I started to save up for a high quality digital sound recorder. At university these highly prized gadgets were rarely placed in the hands of art students. I've hankered after a friendly loan from a bank manager to buy a quality sound recorder but never quite made it. My favourite bbc sound effect (if I'm so stressed I could scream) is the noise of a computer printer followed by the kindest noise of loveliness made by synthesisers I presume. I like to think it was one of Delia's recordings. So, is it safe to come out of the closet (or Tardis) about this kind of thing now? To be truthful I do prefer this interest to have cult status. I'd rather it stay inside the Tardis. Fri 25 Jul 2008 15:45:33 GMT+1 thedarkblonde http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=89#comment49 As an old fan of White Noise it's great to see Delia getting some recognition at last! Fri 25 Jul 2008 15:32:40 GMT+1 Bear in the Bull http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=87#comment48 In post 45. At 2:27pm on 21 Jul 2008, BritishSubject wrote:... Seeing how they created the Tardis sound with a rusty key and the insides of an old piano. That sound was made by Delia's colleague Brian Hodgson, more or less in the manner described. Not sure that the key was rusty, though - it was the key to the front door of his house! [Do not try this at home unless you have the funds to partially re-string your piano afterwards. This technique WILL NOT WORK with a door key and the insides of an electronic piano!]Bear Thu 24 Jul 2008 15:36:42 GMT+1 jpff http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=85#comment47 I was just been pointed at these sounds from a computer music maling list. I always enjoyed the sounds of the Radiophonic Workshop as child listening to the wireless. We tried to create similar sounds with a tape recorder in the early 60s with considerable lack of success. Now I cheat and use the computer to create the sounds, but Derbyshire was a first rate sound designer, and love listening to it here. But.....I did maths at Cambridge. Tue 22 Jul 2008 17:08:06 GMT+1 StarsOnESP http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=83#comment46 Dear god, I demand a box set, preferably on Basta. They did wonders with Raymond Scott and the Phillips Labs and Dick Raaijmakers... Mon 21 Jul 2008 18:42:40 GMT+1 David_Cain http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=81#comment45 I'm glad that all this stuff of Delia's has come to light. Maybe there is someone like David Butler out there who would like to do the same for me! I know there is a lot of stuff of mine in the workshop archives that could bear a listening again. I was much more into combining sound, speech and music into some kind of aural tapestry, for example "Rus" a history of Russian culture written by Michael Mason and created by me with Dick Mills. And I really would like to hear "The Shagbut, the Minikin and the Flemish Clacket" again! Mon 21 Jul 2008 14:09:19 GMT+1 BritishSubject http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=80#comment44 I remember seeing an item about the RW back in the late 70's or early 80's. Seeing how they created the Tardis sound with a rusty key and the insides of an old piano. It might have been Elizabeth Parker they inteviewed. Mon 21 Jul 2008 13:27:53 GMT+1 Ginger http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=78#comment43 I am thrilled to the marrow ! Delia has been a great inspiration to me. I would love to have met her and discussed her techniques, although she would probably be horrified that I do all my composing on a computer ! I just find it sad that despite her incredible talent, she is still never credited for the Doctor Who theme - surely it could be jointly credited with Ron Grainer ? Delia is an icon to so many of us, it seems only right that she should be recognised. Mon 21 Jul 2008 11:43:19 GMT+1 Bear in the Bull http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=76#comment42 In Post 36. At 10:58am on 19 Jul 2008, clovisguy wrote:Electronic music cannot be talked about in the same way as that created by orthodox instruments. To Dribbles I would say that there is no comparison between that type and the music of the great composers such as Mozart, Strauss, Wagner etc. ~~~Isn't it a little ironic, then, that Delia reached Grade 8 in classical piano before she matriculated from Barrs Hill [Coventry Girls' Grammar] School, and that she then went on to win a scholarship to read Mathematics at Girton College, Cambridge University, in 1956, switching to Music in 1957 [She graduated with combined honours in Maths and Music in 1959]. Ironic, too, that musicians such as J S Bach and Wolfgang Mozart [to name but two] show clear evidence of the application of mathematics in some of their compositions. In addition, some of the earliest forms of musical scale were discovered or invented by ancient Greek mathematician Pythagoras. It might also be worth noting that, for much of her time working for the BBC, Delia lived in a flat in Maida Vale, where she kept a spinet, on which she would play "Bach and Bach and Bach" during her lunch hours and other periods of free time. She even noted with joy that the sound of her spinet could fill her room without passing through the floor or walls to disturb her neighbours!Certainly, the ready availability of PCs and sound-editing software means that anyone can now join noises together; but to compose as Delia did, to know how to apply the rules of music, and when and how to break those rules to best effect; that requires as great an understanding of music as was ever required to compose in the styles of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Elgar, Stravinsky, Boulez, Cage or Stockhausen. Bear Sun 20 Jul 2008 00:17:40 GMT+1 Bear in the Bull http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=74#comment41 In Post 40 40. At 10:09pm on 19 Jul 2008, pmLeader wrote:...The Workshop may be seen by it's aficionados as 'out there' in electronic music history, but looked at with that history as starting point it doesn't seem to merit a mention. ~~~The Radiophonic Workshop [RW] [Founded 1958] was a very significant player in the development of electroacoustic music [or musique concrète to be more specific of its work in the 1960s] in the UK. Musique Concrète had its origins a decade earlier, in 1948, in the works of Pierre Henri and Pierre Schaeffer, using some of the earliest tape recorders in a studio in Paris which was to become the birthplace of the Groupe de Recherches Musicales [GRM] in Paris. Naturally, links may be drawn with earlier uses of abstract sound in music, and still earlier with Beethoven's first use of trombone, choir or piano in a symphony. One has to draw the line somewhere. Every development in music was new at some time.The facts remain that the use of tape recorders in creating music was first thoroughly explored by Henri and Schaeffer in the Groupe de Recerches de la Musique Concrète [as the GRM was first known]; and that the work of the Radiophonic Workshop [and especially Delia] in the mid-1960s had a profound effect on the development of Pop. Delia's work was much of the inspiration behind The Beatles' Sgt Pepper and Magical Mystery Tour, a wealth of the late-1960s and early 1970s legacy of Pink Floyd, and the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds albums. The Beatles, Pink Floyd, and some of the Wilson brother [Beach Boys] were just a few of the musicians who visited Delia at Maida Vale.As Well as 'An Electric Storm' - the first offering from The White Noise, readers might like to explore 'The Tomorrow People: Original Television Music' - accredited to Li De La Russe [spot the anagram of DELIA in there?] and Nikki St George [her Radiophonic Workshop colleague, Brian Hodgson, also working incognito] along with David Vorhaus. I could go on - but a little judicious Web trawling will unearth much golden treasure amongst a modicum of [usually fairly obvious] poppycock. Bear Sat 19 Jul 2008 23:19:02 GMT+1 Bear in the Bull http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=72#comment40 In post 26. At 11:56am on 18 Jul 2008, gilesjuk wrote:The article says lost tapes from Dr Who composer. The theme tune was composed by Ron Grainer, Deila arranged it.Of course Grainer wanted her to get joint royalty as he was so impressed with her arrangement (and rightly so).~~~The whole point is that Grainer freely acknowledged that he did not write all of it. Grainer left Delia with some sketchy notes on a sheet of manuscript paper , torn from something else he was working on, and went away to work on another project. The clearest notation was several staves of bass line, and some notes about "wind bubble" and "wind cloud" in amongst the melody. He left Delia to create those abstract sounds, fully expecting to come back a few weeks later and finish the thing with a band or orchestra of some sort. When he returned and heard the composition which she had completed from his notes, he asked if he had really written the piece, to which Delia famously replied with characteristic modesty "well, most of it". So, truth to tell, the piece was truly a joint composition, and Grainer was entirely reasonable and fair in wishing to divide the royalties.BBC bureaucracy [or, dare I suggest, a jealous manager at Maida Vale who rather lacked Delia's imagination and talent] perverted the course of justice on this occasion!Bear Sat 19 Jul 2008 22:35:53 GMT+1 U11204129 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=70#comment39 24Yes, if you think futuristic sounds of themselves interesting.Most of Radiophonic Workshop's output was uninteresting. The Who theme was interesting 'cos it was a great tune.The appealing wail is from the family of sounds I mentioned.Futuristic was OK for the prog, but as tune it was judged good because it was a good.. . tune.The Workshop may be seen by it's aficionados as 'out there' in electronic music history, but looked at with that history as starting point it doesn't seem to merit a mention. Remember the Theremin (?) used in sci fi films as early as '51.Electronic workshops in France, RTF's, and Germany (Stockhausen's turf) pre-date the dear old Beeb's efforts by half a decade.I agree with you about Elton John ,someone else trading on musical ideas strictly from the second hand shops.Does Telstar help you with the point about guitars? 1962, Number 1 in the US Bilboard charts.Could Ron Granger and the clever people Nigel rediscovered in Workshop history have heard it before their creative juices flowed? Perish the thought.Dr. Who, 1963 Sat 19 Jul 2008 21:09:49 GMT+1 Big Sister http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=69#comment38 maccy69 - Thanks for all that! How ignorant I am, and how pleased to get that additional information.Can I revisit my childhood now and imagine these clever women as I listen, entranced, to the intro to Dr. Who? Tardis! Tardis! [with arm raised in taxi-hailing manner] :o) Sat 19 Jul 2008 18:32:21 GMT+1 Taggingalong http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=67#comment37 I worked at Laing Pipelines during 1976 on the radio communications.What has this to do with Delia? Well she had been the previous incumbent of the job and I have to tell you she was mightily respected by all the engineers and crew from Scotland to Cumbria, both French and English. Everyone knew her as the woman who had been in the Radiophonic Workshop and most said she had written the Dr Who theme. I was told she took the job with Laings because she wanted a little space in her life. I can't vouch for her reasons, but I can vouch for how much her workmates thought of her. I'm sorry I never met her, but apparently she was pretty formidable. Sat 19 Jul 2008 17:30:10 GMT+1 wyse99 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=65#comment36 "Electronic music cannot be talked about in the same way as that created by orthodox instruments." is an incredibly stupid comment and an attitude that would have stopped creative composers through the ages from progressing music. Thank goodness we're not just stuck with a choice of the Proms and Sting with a Lute.Clovisguy is right to say that there's no comparison between 'that type' and the 'great composers' but you have to give them a chance; I'm sure if Mozart had access to Delia's technology he might have come up with something nearly as interesting. Sat 19 Jul 2008 16:45:37 GMT+1 clovisguy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=63#comment35 Electronic music cannot be talked about in the same way as that created by orthodox instruments. To Dribbles I would say that there is no comparison between that type and the music of the great composers such as Mozart, Strauss, Wagner etc. I am usually loathe to criticize anyone's taste in music, but in this case I make an exception. The dance track was nothing but a painful noise to my ears. But then most modern music is a pain Sat 19 Jul 2008 09:58:15 GMT+1 grumpy_gill http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=61#comment34 Enjoyable story and thank you BBC for playing the full version of the Dr Who theme.But will someone please tell David Butler the definition of "archive"? *grump* Sat 19 Jul 2008 09:33:45 GMT+1 maccy69 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=59#comment33 At 3:05pm on 17 Jul 2008, Big Sister wrote:Yet another woman whose work behind the scenes was little know. The credits always gave the Radiophonic Workshop, which (as a child watching Dr. Who) I always thought must be some scientists in white coat, or bluecollar workers, but always in my mind they were men. So it was delightful to find out a while back thata the genius behind the sounds was, in fact, a woman.-------------------------------------------14. At 3:48pm on 17 Jul 2008, Frances_O wrote:Wasn't there another composer at the Electronic Workshop called Elizabeth [can't remember her last name]?--------------------------------------------20. At 10:19pm on 17 Jul 2008, maliceinsunderland wrote:Frances-O: you're probably thinking of Elizabeth Parker ?-------------------------------------------As well as Elizabeth Parker, Maddalena Fagandini and Glynis Jones also worked for the Radiophonic Workshop. But arguably the most important female member was Daphne Oram who campaigned for and co-founded the Radiophonic Workshop, along with Desmond Briscoe. Oram and Derbyshire's work is undoubtedly the most pioneering (not that the other members were slouches, especially in the pre-synthesiser days - but they tended to use more conventional musical structures) and Oram even invented a compositional technique called "Oramics" which involved drawing a sound pattern on 35mm film.Oram died in 2003 and her work is also archived, by Goldsmiths, University of London. A selection is available on CD. Fri 18 Jul 2008 22:43:23 GMT+1 paulobograt http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=58#comment32 Genius, pure genius. I thought the Dr Who theme was just the best, and Blue Sands and Golden Veils was so atmospheric, but now I see Delia Derbyshire was also ahead of her time in so many other ways.I think the Dr Who theme was the one thing that stuck in my mind as a youngster, leading to my love of all sorts of electronica, and now this... Fri 18 Jul 2008 21:49:21 GMT+1 Jomac_uk http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=56#comment31 I have just seen this info, does anyone know how to get copies of these tracks and where from? [Personal details removed by Moderator] Fri 18 Jul 2008 21:23:23 GMT+1 JaneBasingstoke http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=54#comment30 Hi ManxomAssuming that you aren't taking the mickey.Your memories of "war surplus sets" and "radar and jets technology" sound more like Quatermass. Both the BBC Quatermass serials and the title character Professor Bernard Quatermass had a big influence on Doctor Who. Also the BBC Radiophonic Workshop people were involved in Quatermass as well. Quatermass dates back to 1953. Fri 18 Jul 2008 19:09:29 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=52#comment29 Interesting...Wikipedia seems to agree with the Beeb: "Doctor Who first appeared on BBC television at 5:15 pm(GMT) on 23 November 1963"Has Manxom had a close encounter with the Cardiff Rift, or does anyone else remember watching Who before 23/11/63? Fri 18 Jul 2008 16:15:52 GMT+1 Manxom http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=50#comment28 I don't know why BBC keeps reporting that Dr. Who was first broadcast in 1963. I recall very distinctly watching Dr. Who on Sunday mornings in Chester in 1956. The music was distinctive. When I heard the theme on Cable in the U.S. in the 1980's, I recognised it immediately. The show was primitive, the sets were war surplus, the technology was all radar and jets, but very definitely was ... The Doctor.Unless I have been caught in a time warp, and the events of the past have been changed by someone meddling in the time line. I do wish those Daleks would get a grip!! Fri 18 Jul 2008 16:09:12 GMT+1 superflyingnimbus http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=49#comment27 Fantastic to hear about the recently digitised tapes, and heart-warming that Delia is becoming a household name at last.Autechre, mentioned in the programme, aren't a dance-orientated hard-core techno act as suggested, but a much more experimental electronic outfit, and have shown real ingenuity over the past decade in pushing their technology to make original-sounding music - in much the same way that Derbyshire did decades ago.However, listening to a track like "Surripere" by Autechre, a track released 40 years after the Doctor Who theme, you really get a sense that Derbyshire was so far ahead of her time as to still sound fresh alongside today's cutting-edge electronic music - which is a unique and phenomenal achievement.It's amazing that she has been so profoundly influential to a whole generation of contemporary electronic musicians that you can still hear her sound underpinning the whole scene today. Fri 18 Jul 2008 13:15:45 GMT+1 JaneBasingstoke http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=47#comment26 From William Shakespeare's Hamlet, Act 1 Scene 5:Ghost I find thee apt; And duller shouldst thou be than the fat weed That roots itself in ease on Lethe wharf, Wouldst thou not stir in this. Now, Hamlet, hear: 'Tis given out that, sleeping in my orchard, A serpent stung me; so the whole ear of Denmark Is by a forged process of my death Rankly abused: but know, thou noble youth, The serpent that did sting thy father's life Now wears his crown. Hamlet O my prophetic soul! My uncle! Ghost Ay, that incestuous, that adulterate beast, With witchcraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts,-- O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power So to seduce!--won to his shameful lust The will of my most seeming-virtuous queen: Fri 18 Jul 2008 12:31:35 GMT+1 Giles Jones http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=45#comment25 The article says lost tapes from Dr Who composer. The theme tune was composed by Ron Grainer, Deila arranged it.Of course Grainer wanted her to get joint royalty as he was so impressed with her arrangement (and rightly so). Fri 18 Jul 2008 10:56:04 GMT+1 ladyloveselectro http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=43#comment24 I have to say, listening to the early dance track created by Delia Derbyshire left me absolutely astounded. What a pioneer! I can't believe this has been hidden away for so many years. Fri 18 Jul 2008 10:26:33 GMT+1 dribbles_ http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=41#comment23 pmleader'The Workshop was an also-ran and late to the fray - except for the Dr. theme. And even that could have been better done on guitars'Erm no that is just a really really stupid thing to say. The whole point was that it sounded futuristic and in an audio sense incredibly innovative. How in a million years would using guitars have made it better? Yeah maybe if they got Elton John in to bang some piano and vocals on top it would have been an improvement. Sigh. Fri 18 Jul 2008 10:14:02 GMT+1 dribbles_ http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=40#comment22 clovisguy I am glad none of delia's work will end up being degraded by ending up in your house! What difference does having 2000 cd's make anyway? Seriously who gives a toss? Possibly the most meaningless boast I have ever heard. Do you realise the sort of thread you are on? Like anyone is gonna be impressed with that. They are prob Micheal Bolton and Mariah Carey albums anyway! Fri 18 Jul 2008 09:51:39 GMT+1 clovisguy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=38#comment21 No more music than fly in the air. The dance track is just a racket, nothing more or less. And before anyone accuses me of not liking music, I have a collection of mor e than 2,000 CD's, LP's, Tapes etc. I would not give her stuff house-room in my collection. Fri 18 Jul 2008 09:42:10 GMT+1 DI_Wyman http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=36#comment20 gossipmistress 11,Your mention of "she used valves from old radios" brought back a memory from my childhood!My father was a keen "electronics hobbyist". He hand built our first stereo amplifier utilising valves (Mullard EL84's etc I think), this gave many years of faithful service and is still occasionally 'fired up' just to prove it still glows.However one side effect of valves is as they age the anode, cathode and grids may be come loose. Now this has a very interesting side effect, they become micro phonic!Simply this means one tune to another....no, no....wrong thread!Simply this means that loud sounds will cause the valve to act like a microphone and the subsequent amplification stages will cause the sound to be heard.So as a boy it was good fun to turn the amp on, up the volume and shout at it!The micro phonic valve would pick up the sound and hey presto one small boy could be heard!The down side to this was 'feedback', if the volume was too high the sound coming out of the loudspeakers would be picked up by said valve, then amplified, then broadcast and then picked up etc.The resultant howling could be heard from quite a distance! Fri 18 Jul 2008 07:45:16 GMT+1 maliceinsunderland http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=34#comment19 Frances-O: you're probably thinking of Elizabeth Parker ?Delia Derbyshire was also involved in THE WHITE NOISE, a late '60s...well, not so much a band as a project, I guess. They released an album, "An Electronic Storm" on Island, Delia co-wrote two of the pieces. You can find still find CD copies, usually fairly cheap. Worth a listen.More recently, a band called IDDODD [? spelling] released a song called "Delia Derbyshire" on a self-produced CD. They've got a page on MySpace if you want to follow it up. Thu 17 Jul 2008 21:19:38 GMT+1 U11204129 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=32#comment18 Hey,The Dr. Who theme was the exception to the Radiophonic rule.Most of it was very dull fare.Meanwhile main stream rock 'n' roll had captured electronic wailing in guitar composing and playing.Of course, you can find it in the forties in America with 'Chillun Boogie' and forty years before that, in pre electronic days. Wailing guitar I mean. And Radiophonic music (like electric guitars before it) was copying, not creating, that sort of sound.But English rock 'n' roll was making a very good fist of it in the years before the Dr Who theme. There was Apache, and Endless Sleep (and before that, years and years of US blues (Howlin' Wolf etc etc) and mainstream rock 'n' roll, there, in which guitars cried out in that electronic way).As a young man, I saw the Workshop as helping the BBC catch up.Jerry Lordan wrote Apache and it was in the hit parade in 1960 (!!!! cf the Doctor theme!!!). I didn't like the Shadows but you have to give them that guitar electronic wail and the most audacious drum line in music.As for Endless Sleep, the guitar on it was something the Workshop would have plucked hairs out to try to emulate. 1958. It's the Marty Wilde recording I'm on about.The Workshop was an also-ran and late to the fray - except for the Dr. theme. And even that could have been better done on guitars.An early Shads Apache is on You Tube. By the style, I'd say it was post their zoot**** suits. About '63 or '64 - trying to look like the Beatles in the guards van in Hard Days.****Actually it was gents natty suiting that they wore. But zootsuit is worth a look at in Wikipedia so I thought I'd drag it in. Thu 17 Jul 2008 20:54:56 GMT+1 jamestwofive http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=30#comment17 can anyone tell me the name of the track played with the drum beat? it sounded like something that could be released on warp records as the guy from orbital pointed out.thanks. Thu 17 Jul 2008 19:11:00 GMT+1 David_McNickle http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=29#comment16 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 16:39:34 GMT+1 David_McNickle http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=27#comment15 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 16:37:53 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=25#comment14 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 15:23:01 GMT+1 needsanewnickname http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=23#comment13 Wasn't there another composer at the Electronic Workshop called Elizabeth [can't remember her last name]?Gossymrs: that razor blade composing sounds v v laborious. Takes me back though. Splice splice stickkkkk. Thu 17 Jul 2008 14:48:23 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=21#comment12 And as for the programmes you remember about her:"In 2002, a play entitled Blue Veils and Golden Sands about her work at the Radiophonic Workshop and subsequent life was broadcast as part of BBC Radio 4's Afternoon Play slot. In September 2006 this was released as part of the 2-CD set, Doctor Who at the BBC: The Plays."Again, also from Wikipedia's article on her. I could spend all day surfing Wikipedia...it's a great way to reduce productivity (Productivity? What's that?) Thu 17 Jul 2008 14:41:09 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=20#comment11 From Wikipedia's article on Delia:"Ron Grainer was so amazed by her rendition of his original theme that he attempted to get her a co-composer credit, but this was prevented by BBC bureaucracy."Shame on you Auntie Beeb!"As synthesizers and multi-track recorders did not exist in those days, much of the Doctor Who theme was constructed by recording the individual notes from electronic sources one by one onto magnetic tape, cutting the tape with a razor blade to get individual notes on little pieces of tape a few centimetres long and sticking all the pieces of tape back together one by one to make up the tune. This was a laborious process which took weeks.">OUCH!< Thu 17 Jul 2008 14:30:23 GMT+1 gossipmistress http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=18#comment10 Big Sis (9) yes I remember that programme about Delia D. I think it was a whole programme about the radiophonic workshop. The name did always sound so exotic on the credits didn't it?I remember hearing how she used valves from old radios to record weird sounds from and the description of the yards and yards of tape she recorded onto laid out down the corridoor. I still think the original Dr Who version is the scariest and the best! Thu 17 Jul 2008 14:14:55 GMT+1 Big Sister http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=16#comment9 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 14:06:53 GMT+1 Big Sister http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=14#comment8 Wasn't there a Radio 4 programme about Delia, about a year ago from memory? Or it may have been an item on Woman's Hour. It was, I remember, very interesting.Yet another woman whose work behind the scenes was little know. The credits always gave the Radiophonic Workshop, which (as a child watching Dr. Who) I always thought must be some scientists in white coat, or bluecollar workers, but always in my mind they were men. So it was delightful to find out a while back thata the genius behind the sounds was, in fact, a woman.Hurrah! Thu 17 Jul 2008 14:05:45 GMT+1 The Stainless Steel Cat http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=12#comment7 Eddie (1):"Into the Bloooooo!"The catchphrase of Captain Invincible in the Alan Arkin film "Return of Captain Invincible" which stars Christopher Lee as a singing super-villain."...if you don't name your poison,I'll have to get the boys in..." Thu 17 Jul 2008 13:11:58 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=10#comment6 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 12:25:24 GMT+1 Stewart_M http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=9#comment5 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 12:24:21 GMT+1 Stewart_M http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=7#comment4 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 12:20:40 GMT+1 Fearless Fred http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=5#comment3 It's not big, and it's not clever, Eddie!Unfortunately, I'm stuch using IE on my parent's computer while I dog-sit. Roll on this evening when I cen get online at home with Safari and Firefox...I'm looking forward to the Delia Derbyshire piece. She's been very influential in electronic music for decades, yet she's not well known... Thu 17 Jul 2008 12:04:47 GMT+1 needsanewnickname http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=3#comment2 Looks OK with Firefox.Delia looks about 14, or am I showing my age? Anyway, hugely looking forward to this piece.btw, mittfh, it probably looks fine inside the tardis, which is, of course, bigger on the inside than on the outside... Thu 17 Jul 2008 11:47:58 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=1#comment1 Wahey! Eddie's found a way to foul up the latest blog format! :DThe extra oo's have killed the margin on the leader and pushed the content of the blue stripe down nearly 4 screens...Someone, call the Doctor! Thu 17 Jul 2008 11:42:19 GMT+1 eddiemair http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2008/07/wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.shtml?page=0#comment0 This post has been Removed Thu 17 Jul 2008 11:23:27 GMT+1